planemannyc
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NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 12:49 am

Cool article in the New York Times. Checked and did not see it being posted.

Some of us at a.net probably live this every day at work. Others like me often wonder how it all comes together.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...elow&WT.nav=top-stories-below&_r=0
 
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777Jet
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 1:05 am

Thank you for sharing that.
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lesfalls
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 1:16 am

Nice article! Thanks for posting it.
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FLIHGH
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 2:39 am

An hour 15 to fuel...that's nuts. Thanks for sharing!
 
copter808
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 2:58 am

Quoting FLIHGH (Reply 3):
An hour 15 to fuel...that's nuts. Thanks for sharing!

Isn't that something like 400 gpm? I don't remember flow rate from my refueling days, but that doesn't sound unreasonable.
 
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hufftheweevil
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 6:13 am

Nicely written piece. They really seem to have done their homework.

I never thought of myself as an "artist", but it kinda makes sense. I work in the PHL ramp tower, and I must say it is a beautiful thing watching a couple hundred aircraft turn around in one shift.

Quoting copter808 (Reply 4):
Quoting FLIHGH (Reply 3):
An hour 15 to fuel...that's nuts. Thanks for sharing!

Isn't that something like 400 gpm? I don't remember flow rate from my refueling days, but that doesn't sound unreasonable.

They quote 236000 lbs, which is about 35000 gallons, which makes it about 470 gpm.

Although, most 777s will accept flow rates much higher than that if the trucks/carts can pump it. 500-600 gpm is about standard for 777s. And contrary to popular belief, connecting to both wings does not make it much faster, if at all.

MD-11s are the fastest I've ever seen. I've clocked one at 770 gpm.
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rushed
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 8:20 am

Is it just me that thinks there was no where near enough alcohol loaded onto that aircraft?
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Rafabozzolla
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 12:23 pm

Quoting rushed (Reply 6):
Is it just me that thinks there was no where near enough alcohol loaded onto that aircraft?

Alcohol and drinks in general IMHO
 
global2
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 4:20 pm

I'm fascinated by the precise numbers of cans and bottles of different beverages, like 39 cans of Suntory beer, as if these they've been scientifically derived by computer modelling over years of study. Yet 500 plastic wings for children??? How many kids are on this flight to Tokyo anyway? I didn't even think they gave these out anymore.
 
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lugie
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 4:22 pm

Quoting Rafabozzolla (Reply 7):
Alcohol and drinks in general IMHO

Exactly, I was a bit surprised about the number of water bottles, especially since they were described as "small" (I assume those Dasani bottles that are regularly handed out 1 per person). 381 bottles for 257 passengers doesn't even allow for a second water run... (?)

Nice article altogether though, thank you for sharing!
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Yakflyer
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 4:37 pm

Quoting lugie (Reply 9):
381 bottles for 257 passengers doesn't even allow for a second water run... (?)

You assume everybody will want a bottle....or two. All airlines are pretty good at knowing statistically what their customers want during the course of the flight and make sure they have enough and a little more for the average flight. I'm sure there are many who would not want a bottle of water at all and would prefer alternative beverages.
 
DiscoverCSG
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 4:46 pm

Quoting lugie (Reply 9):
381 bottles for 257 passengers

Is it possible that this exclusive of the larger bottles the FA's use to fill cups?

After all, the list doesn't mention (for example) red wine, yet I've never been on a longhaul flight that didn't have plenty of that.
 
ec99
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 6:16 pm

Quoting rushed (Reply 6):
Is it just me that thinks there was no where near enough alcohol loaded onto that aircraft?

My guess would be that this is not the total onboard but the total added to the existing stock.

The flight coming in was an overnight from TLV. Perhaps they went through less then expected on that leg so already had a good stock onboard.
 
timpdx
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 7:31 pm

Well they are giving us a select list, obviously there is an alternate to the beef in Y and the halibut in F. No mention of what the breakfast service, is either.

Thx for posting, interesting info-graphic story.
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phileet92
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 7:44 pm

Some nice sponsored content from DL. Interesting partnerships evolving in this space, much like CX's partnerships with The Telegraph, The Atlantic, and Entrepreneur for their beautiful "Life Well Traveled" campaign.

https://lifewelltravelled.cathaypacific.com/en/our-partners/#telegraph

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AABB777
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 9:26 pm

Quoting timpdx (Reply 13):

Well they are giving us a select list, obviously there is an alternate to the beef in Y and the halibut in F. No mention of what the breakfast service, is either.

Thx for posting, interesting info-graphic story.


To be completely accurate, the halibut is for DL Business Class (Delta One), as DL does not have international First Class.
 
747megatop
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 11:05 pm

Quoting ec99 (Reply 12):

The flight coming in was an overnight from TLV. Perhaps they went through less then expected on that leg so already had a good stock onboard.

Well, thar's unlikely/not possible. If you read the article, it clearly states - "After removing leftover food and drinks from the previous flight, workers loaded ..."
 
surfpunk
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 11:08 pm

Quoting hufftheweevil (Reply 5):
Nicely written piece. They really seem to have done their homework.

I never thought of myself as an "artist", but it kinda makes sense. I work in the PHL ramp tower, and I must say it is a beautiful thing watching a couple hundred aircraft turn around in one shift.

Quoting copter808 (Reply 4):
Quoting FLIHGH (Reply 3):
An hour 15 to fuel...that's nuts. Thanks for sharing!

Isn't that something like 400 gpm? I don't remember flow rate from my refueling days, but that doesn't sound unreasonable.

They quote 236000 lbs, which is about 35000 gallons, which makes it about 470 gpm.

Although, most 777s will accept flow rates much higher than that if the trucks/carts can pump it. 500-600 gpm is about standard for 777s. And contrary to popular belief, connecting to both wings does not make it much faster, if at all.

MD-11s are the fastest I've ever seen. I've clocked one at 770 gpm.

Not sure how things have changed in the past 20 years, but at 40 psi of fuel pressure, I could put 750 gpm into a DC-10 or 747, sometimes higher (I've had it over 800). 1:15 to load 230,000 pounds of fuel seems slow by those standards. With one truck, I remember taking about the same time (maybe 5-10 minutes longer) to upload 400,000 pounds to a 744. One thing nice about the 742/744, with two trucks, you could get about 1100-1200 gpm flow rate into the tanks.
 
MCOflyer
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sat Dec 19, 2015 11:36 pm

Sorry to ask, but do they have underground fuel tanks and trucks are there for pumping reasons???

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ro1960
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sun Dec 20, 2015 12:22 am

The article says:
Three workers with illuminated wands, known as marshallers, one positioned in front of the plane and two “wingwalkers” underneath the wings

I don't think we have 3 per aircraft here in Europe. Just the one in front. Am I wrong ?
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skyhawkmatthew
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sun Dec 20, 2015 1:03 am

Quoting ro1960 (Reply 19):
I don't think we have 3 per aircraft here in Europe. Just the one in front. Am I wrong ?

Most of the world doesn't use wing walkers. At some airports there are usually no marshallers at all nowadays, just an electronic guidance system (e.g. HKG) .
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B737900ER
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sun Dec 20, 2015 1:23 am

Quoting skyhawkmatthew (Reply 20):

Most of the world doesn't use wing walkers. At some airports there are usually no marshallers at all nowadays, just an electronic guidance system (e.g. HKG)

It's thought at some major US airlines, that the wing walkers give an extra perception of safety, although not required for safe operation. It's part of the safety culture.
 
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hufftheweevil
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RE: NYT: The Art Of Turning Around An Airplane

Sun Dec 20, 2015 6:13 am

Quoting mcoflyer (Reply 18):
Sorry to ask, but do they have underground fuel tanks and trucks are there for pumping reasons???

Are you talking about ATL, specifically? I believe they do have underground tanks. In that case the "trucks" are called "hydrant carts" or "hydrant trucks", are they are basically just the pump part of a tanker truck. But when it comes to pumping, the principle is the same.
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