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TWA772LR
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 6:18 pm

They dont do it in flight (im guilty of that thought too until a couple years ago). They actually do it on the ground and have everything self-contained on the plane in the hold or cabin (depending on what it is).

It seems very practical actually. Theyve performed thousands of surgeries around the world and all ran by volunteers. Theres a Mighty Planes episode on it.
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OA940
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Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 6:18 pm

Idk if this is in the right forum but whatever.

Before I ask my question, this is a genuine question and not any doubt about what these guys do, but I don't understand how practical Orbis is. I'll be the first to say that I'm not very familiar with what they do, except eye surgeries and stuff in flight (btw that sounds way beyond awesome). Do they do something else that makes the existence of a flying OR practical? Probably. If someone could help me that would be great.

P.S. Am I the only one who thinks this concept would work really well with traumas in the military in place of helicopter transport from bases to cities with military hospitals?
A350/CSeries = bae
 
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Polot
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 6:27 pm

Orbis doesn’t do the surgeries and medical care/training in flight. Don’t really want to be in the middle of a surgical procedure when turbulence hits.

The point of Orbis is to bring world class facilities and personnel to areas lacking in both to provide a mobile center (the aircraft) that can provide training and equipment in needy areas (and surgeries and whatnot while the aircraft is there to lucky needy patients).
 
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kjeld0d
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 6:41 pm

TWA772LR wrote:
They dont do it in flight

Polot wrote:
Orbis doesn’t do the surgeries and medical care/training in flight.


They're missing out on valuable hours, in my opinion!
 
pbody
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 6:56 pm

kjeld0d wrote:
TWA772LR wrote:
They dont do it in flight

Polot wrote:
Orbis doesn’t do the surgeries and medical care/training in flight.


They're missing out on valuable hours, in my opinion!


As far as I understand it most of the equipment can't be used in flight, it also serves absolutely no point because then the patient has been flown away from home and would somehow need to be returned. Also who wants to be having eye surgery when there is even mild turbulence?
 
Flighty
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 7:11 pm

The point is to transport a controlled, (Western?) eye surgery facility to where tons of people need basic procedures done. It is a flying building. A surgery center that is overseen by qualified medical staff. They land the airplane, unpack the supplies and doctors parachute in to perform surgeries right there at the airport.

Eye surgeries can be done fast, depending on procedure. The freight volume of eye surgery supplies is likely quite small. They can probably serve many people during a visit of several weeks. Then, they pack up and take off to be resupplied, or to a new destination. So flights are infrequent (likely under 1 hour per day flight time).

The infrequent flights mean that fuel burn is not a major concern. So the durable DC-10 platform satisfies the need. I really like the use case.
 
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airportugal310
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 7:22 pm

pbody wrote:
kjeld0d wrote:
TWA772LR wrote:
They dont do it in flight

Polot wrote:
Orbis doesn’t do the surgeries and medical care/training in flight.


They're missing out on valuable hours, in my opinion!


As far as I understand it most of the equipment can't be used in flight, it also serves absolutely no point because then the patient has been flown away from home and would somehow need to be returned. Also who wants to be having eye surgery when there is even mild turbulence?


Definitely not this guy!!
“They bought their tickets, they knew what they were getting into. I say, let 'em crash.”
 
DayFreighter
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 7:30 pm

Their current aircraft is an MD-10, donated to them by FedEx. So while not huge given the amount of hours they fly, not needing a flight engineer in the cockpit would add to the "practicality".
 
Yflyer
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 7:39 pm

Flighty wrote:
doctors parachute in to perform surgeries right there at the airport.


I assume the doctors don't literally parachute in... but how cool would that be if they did!
 
Sancho99504
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 7:39 pm

They have an Instagram account that I follow. They're pretty active on it and you'll get to see some behind the scenes stuff on how they prepare for a mission, where they go, how they do it.
The plane was donated from FedEx, the pilots are either retired from FX or volunteer their time when not on roster at FX.
kill 'em all and let God sort 'em out-USMC
 
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OA940
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 9:02 pm

Thanks guys! Also I guess doing any kind of surgery in flight may not be ideal. Also also I guess I had the wrong idea as to what they were doing over there. My bad.
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flyingclrs727
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 9:10 pm

DayFreighter wrote:
Their current aircraft is an MD-10, donated to them by FedEx. So while not huge given the amount of hours they fly, not needing a flight engineer in the cockpit would add to the "practicality".


It's FedEx pilots who fly the plane. I'm not sure if all the DC-10's without the MD-10 upgrade have been retired, but eventually there will only be MD-11's and MD-10's. The FedEx pilots who are rated for the MD-11 can fly it.
 
nmdrdh787
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 9:11 pm

OA940 wrote:
Thanks guys! Also I guess doing any kind of surgery in flight may not be ideal. Also also I guess I had the wrong idea as to what they were doing over there. My bad.


No problem with asking questions!

I'm a HUGE Orbis fan, to the point where I am trying to create something similar myself on a wider scale and with more aircraft.

As far as I believe, the aircraft was donated to them by Fedex (with $5 million), they had to raise more funds for refurbishment.

As far as I know also, Fedex gives them pilots (helps FE with hours), and maybe mx staff? Not sure who pays for fuel, parts, etc.

Back when they had the DC-10-10 I believe UA supplied crews. Maybe with the DC-8 also as that was a former UA plane. Not 100% sure.
 
asuflyer
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Fri Jun 22, 2018 11:06 pm

My ophthalmologist volunteered with Orbis in the past, he really thought it was an impactful experience to give back, as in many countries the patients have severe eye conditions and have never even seen an eye doctor before. Originally UA was the main supporter of the program, they donated a DC-8 and DC-10 to Orbis. FX now supports the program and the FX pilots also are volunteering their time. The majority of the supplies come from donations from hospitals, medical industry and private donors.
 
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DocLightning
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Sat Jun 23, 2018 12:58 am

kjeld0d wrote:
TWA772LR wrote:
They dont do it in flight

Polot wrote:
Orbis doesn’t do the surgeries and medical care/training in flight.


They're missing out on valuable hours, in my opinion!


Ophthalmologic surgery is extremely delicate and single-millimeter errors can lead to devastating outcomes. One does not attempt such a thing when the floor is liable to move.

Also, in the finest of A.net tradition, I am going to nitpick:

Surgery is a medical discipline in which surgeons a) decide which patients are good candidates for surgical procedures and b) perform those procedures when medically indicated.

When you perform such a procedure on a patient, it is not "a surgery;" it is an operation. It is also acceptable to call it a "procedure." When surgeons are at work, they usually call them "cases."

In the UK and other Commonwealth nations in which English is spoken poorly ;) :duck: , a "surgery" may also refer to a doctor's office.
-Doc Lightning-

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DarkSnowyNight
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Sat Jun 23, 2018 1:30 am

DocLightning wrote:


Surgery is a medical discipline in which surgeons a) decide which patients are good candidates for surgical procedures and b) perform those procedures when medically indicated.

When you perform such a procedure on a patient, it is not "a surgery;" it is an operation. It is also acceptable to call it a "procedure." When surgeons are at work, they usually call them "cases."

In the UK and other Commonwealth nations in which English is spoken poorly ;) :duck: , a "surgery" may also refer to a doctor's office.


Interesting. I did not know that.

For what it's worth, if such things things were to supply you with an emotion somewhat between mild frustration and amusement (which I am sure the Germans would have a word for), I would certainly find that relatable. It seems folks have such misconceptions about almost every modern industry. You'd be amazed how many people, even here on the a.net, think Port and Starboard are real aviation terms...

It does make me wonder what I must not know about all kinds of other gigs. ..
"Ya Can't Win, Rocky! There's no Oxygen on Mars!"
"Yeah? That means there's no Oxygen for him Neither..."
 
Max Q
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Sat Jun 23, 2018 2:14 am

Not sure as to the ongoing extent of support for Orbis from FDX but their pilots all volunteer their time, using vacation and days off to fly for this operation
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.


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USAirKid
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Sat Jun 23, 2018 9:42 am

DarkSnowyNight wrote:
You'd be amazed how many people, even here on the a.net, think Port and Starboard are real aviation terms...



Well, isn't port a beverage served by FAs on Qantas?
 
txjim
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Sat Jun 23, 2018 5:19 pm

DarkSnowyNight wrote:


For what it's worth, if such things things were to supply you with an emotion somewhat between mild frustration and amusement (which I am sure the Germans would have a word for), I would certainly find that relatable. It seems folks have such misconceptions about almost every modern industry. You'd be amazed how many people, even here on the a.net, think Port and Starboard are real aviation terms...

It does make me wonder what I must not know about all kinds of other gigs. ..


My company designs a great deal of equipment for aircraft and uses port and starboard constantly in describing equipment locations. I'm not sure what aspects of the industry you are claiming don't use the terms.
 
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XAM2175
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Sat Jun 23, 2018 10:08 pm

txjim wrote:
DarkSnowyNight wrote:
You'd be amazed how many people, even here on the a.net, think Port and Starboard are real aviation terms...

My company designs a great deal of equipment for aircraft and uses port and starboard constantly in describing equipment locations. I'm not sure what aspects of the industry you are claiming don't use the terms.


I understand the phrasing is used to some extent in aviation engineering to avoid ambiguity when describing positions within assemblies verses positions on the aircraft - for example, it used to be RAF practice to describe engines as "port outer" and so on) - but it is not used in traffic control and navigation.

There is a suggestion that this itself has its roots in naval aviation - aircraft are directed using L/R to differentiate from the carrier using P/S terminology.
 
FlyingElvii
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Sun Jun 24, 2018 5:25 am

flyingclrs727 wrote:
DayFreighter wrote:
Their current aircraft is an MD-10, donated to them by FedEx. So while not huge given the amount of hours they fly, not needing a flight engineer in the cockpit would add to the "practicality".


It's FedEx pilots who fly the plane. I'm not sure if all the DC-10's without the MD-10 upgrade have been retired, but eventually there will only be MD-11's and MD-10's. The FedEx pilots who are rated for the MD-11 can fly it.

It is still on the Fx certificate and dispatching??
 
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flyingclrs727
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:32 am

FlyingElvii wrote:
flyingclrs727 wrote:
DayFreighter wrote:
Their current aircraft is an MD-10, donated to them by FedEx. So while not huge given the amount of hours they fly, not needing a flight engineer in the cockpit would add to the "practicality".


It's FedEx pilots who fly the plane. I'm not sure if all the DC-10's without the MD-10 upgrade have been retired, but eventually there will only be MD-11's and MD-10's. The FedEx pilots who are rated for the MD-11 can fly it.

It is still on the Fx certificate and dispa6tching??


It probably is. FedEx maintains it and supplies the pilots.
 
Max Q
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Re: Practicality of Orbis?

Mon Jun 25, 2018 4:18 am

Using port and starboard in aviation
makes no sense, those terms belong at sea otherwise you’re just being pretentious
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.


Guns are a malignant cancer that are destroying our society

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