akb88
Topic Author
Posts: 153
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:44 am

Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 4:37 am

I do have anxiety disorders and in the last 5 years or so I've been having flight anxiety which I never had before. I always attributed it to my dad getting diagnosed with Alzheimers and the added responsibility on me to take care of him. He passed in August but the fear remains and is as bad as ever. I'm doing a trip just before Easter to visit my girlfriend in Greece. Flying from Keflavík to Oslo with Icelandair and then onwards to Athens with Norwegian (providing they'll be in business by then) and then back home from Heraklio to Munchen with Condor and Munchen to Keflavík with Icelandair. I'm already having anticipatory anxiety over turbulence. In particular turbulence that jolts the plane up and down and throws any loose object around the plan or drops several hundred or thousand feet. I've spent entire flights lately waiting for that jolt, but it hasn't happened, it must be very rare but it's one of the fears I have. I also have lingering fear of an old and badly maintained aircraft leading to an accident.
I know these fears are largely irrational and they surprise me cause I used to be a huge fan of aviation and still am really. I'm trying various methods to change my way of thinking and I wonder if I should take a short domestic flight to see if I have made any progress.
It must be rare to encounter turbulence like I described, but I can't help getting anxious over possibly being in a situation like that. Are therer any bad trouble spots you know of on the flight pats to and from Greece to central Europe?
 
747Whale
Posts: 725
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:41 pm

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 5:09 am

There's really. no turbulence that drops the airplane hundreds or thousands of feet. What you're feeling in turbulence is mostly a foot or two, if that, and in most cases, what you're actually feeling is wing flex shaking the airplane. Turbulence that moves things in the cabin is severe, and very rare.

Turbulence. you're likely to encounter enroute will be when operating near the jet stream, and when flying during winds of 30 knots or more around mountains. Greece and Iceland, of course, are both mountainous. Most of your transatlantic flying should be fairly calm. I seldom get significant turbulence in Europe.

You may benefit from taking some anti-anxiety medication before flying, or try something like St. Johns's Wort.
 
User avatar
PatrickZ80
Posts: 3916
Joined: Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:33 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:33 am

In all of my flights in Europe and outside it (and there have been a lot) I've never experienced turbulence anywhere like you described. That doesn't mean it's impossible, but it's highly unlikely. Most times I had "turbulence" it was like a car driving on a bumpy road. A bit shaky, but not too bad. Nothing serious. The fasten seat belt signs came on, but the crew just kept walking through the cabin.

You've been waiting for that jolt that throws the plane up and down? You can wait forever and you might never experience it. Like i said, it's very rare. But even if it does happen, so what? The plane is built to take it, it won't make you crash. And as long as you got your seat belt fastened you won't get thrown out of your seat, what's the worst that can happen? You spill hot coffee over your pants? You'll live through it.

Old and badly maintained aircraft leading to an accident? Impossible! All aircraft in Europe must meat certain safety conditions and they're pretty severe, so all aircraft in Europe are well maintained. Some may be a bit older, but that doesn't make them less safe.
 
akb88
Topic Author
Posts: 153
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:44 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 4:09 pm

Thanks for your responses, I honestly wasn't expecting to get any since what I'm describing is kinda lame and pathetic. I KNOW that flying is the most safe way to travel and I never had issues until in the last 5 years like I mentioned in my OP. I'm like a worst case scenario kinda guy and having seen videos of those "rollercoaster" turbulances I just get fearful that it might happen to me and I don't think I'd be able to handle that.
I have no qualms about driving a car down a bumpy and icy road but having something bad happen in the air worries me.
 
PSAatSAN4Ever
Posts: 845
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2018 5:38 pm

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:39 pm

akb88 wrote:
Thanks for your responses, I honestly wasn't expecting to get any since what I'm describing is kinda lame and pathetic. I KNOW that flying is the most safe way to travel and I never had issues until in the last 5 years like I mentioned in my OP. I'm like a worst case scenario kinda guy and having seen videos of those "rollercoaster" turbulances I just get fearful that it might happen to me and I don't think I'd be able to handle that.
I have no qualms about driving a car down a bumpy and icy road but having something bad happen in the air worries me.


It is most certainly NOT lame or pathetic. In my experience, when one tries to talk themselves out of their fear for that reason, it ends up becoming worse.

Oddly enough, I have no fear of flying or being on a roller coaster. But put me on a ladder? BING!! Vertigo, and a fear that I am already falling. I can look out from a tall building, but looking down? HELL no!!

My husband has always had a fear of flying. Since being married to me, though, he has had to listen to some of the programs on TV about the science of aviation accidents, and although it freaked him out at first, he has been able to lower his stress level on board an airplane. I don't know if a de-sensitization program might work for you, but it did for him.

I hope this works out for you!
 
akb88
Topic Author
Posts: 153
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:44 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 8:02 pm

PSAatSAN4Ever wrote:
akb88 wrote:
Thanks for your responses, I honestly wasn't expecting to get any since what I'm describing is kinda lame and pathetic. I KNOW that flying is the most safe way to travel and I never had issues until in the last 5 years like I mentioned in my OP. I'm like a worst case scenario kinda guy and having seen videos of those "rollercoaster" turbulances I just get fearful that it might happen to me and I don't think I'd be able to handle that.
I have no qualms about driving a car down a bumpy and icy road but having something bad happen in the air worries me.


It is most certainly NOT lame or pathetic. In my experience, when one tries to talk themselves out of their fear for that reason, it ends up becoming worse.

Oddly enough, I have no fear of flying or being on a roller coaster. But put me on a ladder? BING!! Vertigo, and a fear that I am already falling. I can look out from a tall building, but looking down? HELL no!!

My husband has always had a fear of flying. Since being married to me, though, he has had to listen to some of the programs on TV about the science of aviation accidents, and although it freaked him out at first, he has been able to lower his stress level on board an airplane. I don't know if a de-sensitization program might work for you, but it did for him.

I hope this works out for you!


I don't mind being on an actual rollercoaster, I've stood on top of the Empire State Building and Rockefeller Center. No issue at all. But if my plane starts to shake, I get nervous about it crashing.
Those accident programs is one of the reasons I'm being like this now. The entire flights I'm expecting the pilot to come on and saying something about it being bumpy and it ending up being like a rollercoaster instead of a plane ride. With every loose object being thrown about and the weather bringing the plane down.
 
User avatar
PatrickZ80
Posts: 3916
Joined: Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:33 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 8:30 pm

akb88 wrote:
having seen videos of those "rollercoaster" turbulances


Videos are always different from reality. Even if it's an unedited video of real heavy turbulence, on video it always seems even worse than it is in reality. The reason for this is that the camera is shaking too, so you get a "double shake" effect. Every movement of the plane is intensified by the movement of the camera.

And then of course there's video's of "Hollywood style" turbulence. All acted, nothing real about it. I don't know if you've seen the first episode of Manifest, the series that currently run on NBC. They were experiencing turbulence as well. You know, that scene was shot in a loose aircraft cabin that was just standing on the ground and they were pretending turbulence. They shook the camera to make it look real, but it was all fake.

Of course it's okay to get nervous when the plane starts shaking, lots of people get nervous from that. Just know in the back of your head that this is nothing to be afraid of, it won't make the plane crash. At least, no plane ever crashed just because of turbulence. If it crashes, there's always more involved. Planes are built to endure turbulence. It's uncomfortable, but not unsafe.
 
User avatar
PatrickZ80
Posts: 3916
Joined: Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:33 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 8:36 pm

akb88 wrote:
With every loose object being thrown about and the weather bringing the plane down.


Loose objects being thrown about could happen if the turbulence is very severe, but the weather won't bring the plane down. That's for sure. It might fall a few hundred feet, then hitting a more solid layer of air that stops it from falling further. Sometimes this solid layer of air even acts like a trampoline, bouncing the aircraft back up. At an altitude of 40.000 feet, what do those few hundred feet matter? The pilots see their altitude meter go up and down, but overall the aircraft stays at more or less the same altitude.
 
coolian2
Posts: 2483
Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2006 3:34 pm

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 8:47 pm

A rollercoaster is being operated by a bored minimum wage teen. An airliner is not.

I used to fly gliders without a second thought whereas I'm still scared of rollercoasters, I put it down to knowing I had a pretty big stake in not messing up.

That's how I rationalise it.
Q300/ATR72-600/737-200/-300/-400/-700/-800/A320/767-200/-300/757-200/777-300ER/
747-200/-300/-400/ER/A340-300/A380-800/MD-83/-88/CRJ-700/-900
 
User avatar
bluestreak
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 8:17 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:00 pm

Anxiety can ruin the flying experience, and prevent you from taking more flights, and perhaps missing out on some great adventures. I know this because, like you, out of nowhere, I developed this same anxiety. I would fear having panic attacks on planes, and passed up on a few opportunities because I was too fearful to fly.

I had booked a trip to Australia, and about a month before the flight, I started stressing out. I would have nightmares, and my heart would race when I thought about the 14 hour flight. Finally, I went to my doctor, explained the situation, and he prescribed a low dose of Xanax for me. That really helped me to relax. The key is to take it about half an hour before boarding. I was finally able to take some of the trips I had been wanting to.

But I didn't want to become dependent, or addicted to such a drug. So I started looking at alternatives. I tried over the counter sleeping pills, and a Tylenol PM, both helped. But eventually, I over came the fear. It wasn't easy, and sometimes the fear will start to come back, but so far I have been able to stop the panic by having Xanax, or sleeping pills with me in case I need them, and trying to concentrate on the destination, and the events I have planned there. Also, deep breathing exercises help, along with distractions, such as a good book, music, or a game on your phone.

I know how bad this can be. I wish you luck, and encourage you to at least talk to a physician about it if you need to. Think about the time you will spend with your girlfriend, and the things you will be doing in Greece. The flight is part of the adventure, don't let the fear ruin it for you.

Best of luck, maybe let us know how it goes when you return?
"Well, we barely made the airport, for the last plane out, as we taxied down the runway, I could hear the people shout"
 
akb88
Topic Author
Posts: 153
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:44 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:48 pm

bluestreak wrote:
Anxiety can ruin the flying experience, and prevent you from taking more flights, and perhaps missing out on some great adventures. I know this because, like you, out of nowhere, I developed this same anxiety. I would fear having panic attacks on planes, and passed up on a few opportunities because I was too fearful to fly.

I had booked a trip to Australia, and about a month before the flight, I started stressing out. I would have nightmares, and my heart would race when I thought about the 14 hour flight. Finally, I went to my doctor, explained the situation, and he prescribed a low dose of Xanax for me. That really helped me to relax. The key is to take it about half an hour before boarding. I was finally able to take some of the trips I had been wanting to.

But I didn't want to become dependent, or addicted to such a drug. So I started looking at alternatives. I tried over the counter sleeping pills, and a Tylenol PM, both helped. But eventually, I over came the fear. It wasn't easy, and sometimes the fear will start to come back, but so far I have been able to stop the panic by having Xanax, or sleeping pills with me in case I need them, and trying to concentrate on the destination, and the events I have planned there. Also, deep breathing exercises help, along with distractions, such as a good book, music, or a game on your phone.

I know how bad this can be. I wish you luck, and encourage you to at least talk to a physician about it if you need to. Think about the time you will spend with your girlfriend, and the things you will be doing in Greece. The flight is part of the adventure, don't let the fear ruin it for you.

Best of luck, maybe let us know how it goes when you return?


Oh wow, how did you manage to get over it? And thinking about her and all the fun we'll have in Greece is all I can do to not go completely crazy. Most of my aniety is just anticipatory, I'm anticipating something bad to happen. It hasn't happened yet though. I'm also flying brand new routes and flying over the Alps for the first time which I expect to be bumpy.
 
User avatar
CarlosSi
Posts: 579
Joined: Sat Jul 08, 2017 8:29 pm

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sun Feb 10, 2019 12:16 am

Thousands of flights operate through turbulence every blank period of time; no need to worry ;) . I admit even I was a bit anxious once flying through turbulence for quite a while, but deep down I knew this was fine.
 
747Whale
Posts: 725
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:41 pm

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:01 am

akb88 wrote:
Thanks for your responses, I honestly wasn't expecting to get any since what I'm describing is kinda lame and pathetic.


No, it's not. It's not lame, nor pathetic. It's realistic, and valid.

There is NOTHING natural about hurdling through space with -54 degree temperatures outside at nearly the speed of sound, blind, for long distances over mountains and sea, in nothing but a glorified beer can. There's every reason to be frightened or uncomfortable, and a lot of people are. It's a perfectly reasonable fear.

I do this for a living, and have for a long time. I have a long standing fear of heights. A lot of pilots do. I've been a parachutist and skydiver since I was in high school as a teenager, but I'm deathly afraid of heights. I don't like ladders. Irrational? No. We're not made like mountain goats or geckos. We break of we fall, even short distances. Reasonable fears are protective in nature

Your concerns are valid. Sometimes it helps to understand what's happening more to deal with the fear. I always recommend that people sit close to a window, look at the horizon, instead of inside the airplane. Get some air blowing on your face. Take something to calm you before the flight. Some fly better on a full stomach, some empty. Get comfortable; the more comfortable you are in general, the better you'll handle the flight.

When my mother took her first flight, she saw the flaps lowered and in a panic called for a flight attendant (stewardess in those days); she thought the wings were falling apart. Not knowing can make things worse. The imagination does all kinds of mean things. If the airplane feels as though it drops, one can imagine it falling thousands of feet and then picture wings breaking off and a hollywood-style disasterous ending. The truth is that the airplane is only displaced a foot or so, and the airframe doesn't know the difference; as people in the aircraft we feel it in the pit of our stomach and then our imagination does the rest.

I once departed a European airport with a new First Officer. He was flying. As we departed, we experienced quite a bit of turbulence. Nothing too exciting, just shaking, more annoying than anything. The F/O commented that it was turbulent, and I suggested he let go of the controls. The turbulence quit. He held the controls again and the turbulence started. The problem? He was moving the ailerons too much and int he 747 it caused a flex of the wing that was a bit like flicking a towel, a ripple and pop effect that felt like turbulence. In reality it was nothing, but he had no idea he was doing it. That's all it takes; a little movement of the wing, and as you're suspended between them like a mellon on a stretched towel, you feel the bounces each time the wings flex or move. They're designed to do that, but most of what you feel is just the airplane bouncing a very small amount that way.

Armed with that knowledge, you may be able to relax a bit and focus on the inflight movie, instead.

I recommend Deadpool.
 
akb88
Topic Author
Posts: 153
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:44 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sun Feb 10, 2019 2:59 am

747Whale wrote:
akb88 wrote:
Thanks for your responses, I honestly wasn't expecting to get any since what I'm describing is kinda lame and pathetic.


No, it's not. It's not lame, nor pathetic. It's realistic, and valid.

There is NOTHING natural about hurdling through space with -54 degree temperatures outside at nearly the speed of sound, blind, for long distances over mountains and sea, in nothing but a glorified beer can. There's every reason to be frightened or uncomfortable, and a lot of people are. It's a perfectly reasonable fear.

I do this for a living, and have for a long time. I have a long standing fear of heights. A lot of pilots do. I've been a parachutist and skydiver since I was in high school as a teenager, but I'm deathly afraid of heights. I don't like ladders. Irrational? No. We're not made like mountain goats or geckos. We break of we fall, even short distances. Reasonable fears are protective in nature

Your concerns are valid. Sometimes it helps to understand what's happening more to deal with the fear. I always recommend that people sit close to a window, look at the horizon, instead of inside the airplane. Get some air blowing on your face. Take something to calm you before the flight. Some fly better on a full stomach, some empty. Get comfortable; the more comfortable you are in general, the better you'll handle the flight.

When my mother took her first flight, she saw the flaps lowered and in a panic called for a flight attendant (stewardess in those days); she thought the wings were falling apart. Not knowing can make things worse. The imagination does all kinds of mean things. If the airplane feels as though it drops, one can imagine it falling thousands of feet and then picture wings breaking off and a hollywood-style disasterous ending. The truth is that the airplane is only displaced a foot or so, and the airframe doesn't know the difference; as people in the aircraft we feel it in the pit of our stomach and then our imagination does the rest.

I once departed a European airport with a new First Officer. He was flying. As we departed, we experienced quite a bit of turbulence. Nothing too exciting, just shaking, more annoying than anything. The F/O commented that it was turbulent, and I suggested he let go of the controls. The turbulence quit. He held the controls again and the turbulence started. The problem? He was moving the ailerons too much and int he 747 it caused a flex of the wing that was a bit like flicking a towel, a ripple and pop effect that felt like turbulence. In reality it was nothing, but he had no idea he was doing it. That's all it takes; a little movement of the wing, and as you're suspended between them like a mellon on a stretched towel, you feel the bounces each time the wings flex or move. They're designed to do that, but most of what you feel is just the airplane bouncing a very small amount that way.

Armed with that knowledge, you may be able to relax a bit and focus on the inflight movie, instead.

I recommend Deadpool.


Wow that's quite the info and will prove useful. The thing is that I am really into aviation and planes! I know more about planes than the average person out there but still the fear managed to manifest itself.
It's good to know that the "drop" in the bad turbulances are just few feet (if that) and hopefully my flights over Europe will be smooth. The short flight over the Austrian alps on my way to Munchen might be quite bumpy though I'm guessing.
 
spacecadet
Posts: 3462
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2001 3:36 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:43 am

I'm in flight training right now and I don't like turbulence as a passenger - a lot of actual pilots I've talked to don't. (Pilots are people too.) So it's not stupid or lame. It's a little different when you're up front because you're in control and you always know what's going on, but in the back it's at best annoying to me, and if there's a sudden jolt I wasn't expecting, even I can get startled. If turbulence is particularly bad, I do start to wonder if there's anything more the pilots could be trying to do about it. (Usually they will change altitude, but there could be a number of reasons why they don't.) I think in those cases, an announcement of some kind from the flight deck is appreciated, but this has become a lot rarer over the years. I think a lot of pilots might just be afraid of saying something that inadvertently makes people even more fearful when the turbulence itself is not dangerous to begin with.

But the couple things you can remind yourself are that first, the pilots in almost all cases are expecting the turbulence and know at least approximately what its intensity is going to be and how long it's going to last. And second, that they just wouldn't fly through turbulence that was dangerous.

In addition to all the weather data collection going on from the ground all over a continent like Europe, you've also got tons of other pilots flying through the same areas you will be. So if there's turbulence strong enough to be even uncomfortable, let alone dangerous, your pilots are going to know about it. There are a lot of data collection sources for turbulence, and turbulence reports are part of the standard dispatch package your pilots will have gotten prior to the flight. Any new turbulence that pops up during the flight will also be reported to your pilots by either ATC or even other planes in the area (via their own reports to ATC).

So if you hit a little turbulence that *you* weren't expecting, just know that it's almost certainly not a surprise to your pilots, and they know how to handle it. (Which in most cases is going to be to do nothing at all, unless it's going to last a particularly long time or be a bit stronger than passengers are usually comfortable with. In which case they may just try to change altitudes for comfort reasons... not because of safety.)
I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
 
akb88
Topic Author
Posts: 153
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:44 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:43 pm

Thanks for your responses, they do help. I did just happen upon a segment from some news outlet though which was talking about mechanics with American being pressured to cut corners. I wonder if that is happening in Europe as well.
 
User avatar
bluestreak
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 8:17 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:33 am

akb88 wrote:
Oh wow, how did you manage to get over it? And thinking about her and all the fun we'll have in Greece is all I can do to not go completely crazy. Most of my aniety is just anticipatory, I'm anticipating something bad to happen. It hasn't happened yet though. I'm also flying brand new routes and flying over the Alps for the first time which I expect to be bumpy.



What helped me the most was the visit to the Dr. He explained what to do in that situation. In case I panicked, he asked me to think of the worst thing that could happen. I thought I was going to throw up a couple of times. He asked "So what? That isn't the end of the world. People get sick on airplanes all the time." So even if I did feel panic setting in, I just tried to deal with it, telling myself everything was ok, and knowing I had nothing to worry about. Also, the Xanax helped a lot. I didn't always take it, but knowing I had it relaxed me a little.

Something bad could happen at any time. A car accident, or a slip and fall. Most people don't stress about that, so that's what I tried to replace with fear in my mind. It wasn't the easiest thing I have ever done, and occasionally, it does come back. Besides, there is nothing you can do to change the weather, so if there is turbulence, let the professionals in the cockpit handle that.

If you feel overwhelmed, and can't stop stressing about it, please talk to a physician. They are the professionals, and can give you better advise. Again, I wish you good luck, let us know how it turns out.
"Well, we barely made the airport, for the last plane out, as we taxied down the runway, I could hear the people shout"
 
timh4000
Posts: 194
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:14 pm

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:32 pm

847whale made a valid point about the rationality. As humans, for 10 s of thousands of years we have been a civilized species. we've remained on the ground traveling at most by the speed of a horse. Then, suddenly at the turn of the 20th century powered flight was accomplished. But it still took decades before the "average" person took to the air. So, don't feel bad about your anxiety.
I think one of the reasons why I have never had much was living a few miles from the SJC airport. Its busy enough or was even back in the late 80's so that on any given day I saw several dozen coming in on final. Then thinking that SFO among dozens of others in the u.s. alone were busier than what I would see. Day after day after day without major incidents. Just a half a dozen times a year would we hear of an airliner going down and a high majority of those were in 3rd world countries.

One thing I did use to experience was discomfort during the initial climg out. Going down the runway I wished we were going faster. And I perceived the angle to be steeper than it actually is. Where at the steepest part of climb out they rarely get steeper than say 20%, if they even hit that, and they have capabilities to go steeper. But to me it felt close to stalling. Add in some low level turbulence and maybe a quick turn once airborne it was a jittery couple of minutes for me. I felt better once we had a few thousand feet below us, the flaps were retracted, I could here more wind noise. Now, thinking about the thousands upon thousands of pax airliners in the air every day now even the initial take off and climb out doesn't bother me as much. I think most pilots and FA's are no big fans of turbulence. They have more experience with it as it is their job and spend 40+hrs a week in the air typically. So, the rough stuff I'm no fan of either. The stuff that gives you that zero g feeling in your seat which only lasts a half a second if that. I'd agree too, maybe a dr. Prescribed anti anxiety med. Ativan works well for me, but there are many out there that will help. Good luck, and pleasant travels.
 
Tenaja85
Posts: 59
Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:42 pm

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Mon Feb 11, 2019 5:15 pm

akb88 wrote:
Thanks for your responses, they do help. I did just happen upon a segment from some news outlet though which was talking about mechanics with American being pressured to cut corners. I wonder if that is happening in Europe as well.


American mechanics are also in contract negotiations, and these claims are an effort to negotiate better contracts for the Mechanic's Union. It does not mean that corners are being cut-- there is a lot of oversight in both the US and Europe to ensure that every plane flying is in airworthy condition!
 
akb88
Topic Author
Posts: 153
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:44 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:25 pm

Tenaja85 wrote:
akb88 wrote:
Thanks for your responses, they do help. I did just happen upon a segment from some news outlet though which was talking about mechanics with American being pressured to cut corners. I wonder if that is happening in Europe as well.


American mechanics are also in contract negotiations, and these claims are an effort to negotiate better contracts for the Mechanic's Union. It does not mean that corners are being cut-- there is a lot of oversight in both the US and Europe to ensure that every plane flying is in airworthy condition!


Oh that's interesting.
 
spacecadet
Posts: 3462
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2001 3:36 am

Re: Developed fear of flying. Turbulence and faults.

Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:42 am

akb88 wrote:
Thanks for your responses, they do help. I did just happen upon a segment from some news outlet though which was talking about mechanics with American being pressured to cut corners. I wonder if that is happening in Europe as well.


I don't know what you saw but if there was any truth to that report, the FAA would already be investigating and it would be all over the news. I follow aviation news and I haven't seen anything about this. Airlines can't just unilaterally cut corners - they have to follow FAA (and European) regulations, and one of those regulations is to have maintenance programs in place that conform to their operations manual - which has to be on file and approved by the FAA.

Now, there can occasionally be different ways of accomplishing the same maintenance task. And very rarely in the past, that has led to trouble. The good news is those cases have led to even stricter regulations and oversight and generally even such "alternate" procedures are no longer acceptable to the FAA. So I can't imagine any of this cutting corners would be looked upon kindly by the FAA if it is occurring. It would stop pretty quickly if it were really happening.
I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: vuelti24 and 29 guests

Popular Searches On Airliners.net

Top Photos of Last:   24 Hours  •  48 Hours  •  7 Days  •  30 Days  •  180 Days  •  365 Days  •  All Time

Military Aircraft Every type from fighters to helicopters from air forces around the globe

Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos