filipinoavgeek
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Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 5:26 am

What are good examples of airline types that were specifically developed for a single airline?

An example would be the A350-900ULR, which from what I've read was developed specifically for an SQ requirement and thus far has not received any orders from any other airline, and the chances of another airline ordering it in the future are currently very slim (I'm not even sure if Airbus is actively seeking more customers for it at all).

Honorable mention to the 767-400ER which was developed due to Continental and Delta requirements and is currently only operated by DL and UA (though to be fair, Boeing did try to sell the type to other airlines without much success; in any case it doesn't count as developed for one airline, but it could be said that it was made for two). Another honorable mention would be the 747-400ER, which currently is only operated by Qantas, although IIRC the plane wasn't developed specifically for Qantas (and that other airlines were interested but didn't order it in the end) and it has multiple freight operators.
I'm not sure if the Dassault Mercure counts: it was only operated by one airline in the end (Air Inter), but Dassault had more plans for the type and didn't intend for things to go that way.
I'm also not sure if the Convair 880 counts either: it was developed with TWA in mind, but it ended up being operated by other airlines as well.
 
CRJ900
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 5:42 am

Caravelle 12 was developed for Sterling Airways, which was a big Caravelle 10B operator and wanted more seating capacity. Sterling ordered 12 but took only 7, the other five went to Air Inter. Sterling flew them 12 years and then they went to Air Inter and/or Air Mediterranee.
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Crackshot
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 5:43 am

The 747-400ER was designed on request by Qantas IIRC. I'm not sure if the 747-400M was a KLM request, I know Air Canada also operated some.

One particularly interesting one is the short range variants designed for Japan Airlines and All Nippon. The 747SR and 747-400D were specifically designed for short haul, high-density routes, with max capacity and some design changes to allow them to handle the stress from constant takeoffs/landings. One of them was lost in one of the worst disasters in aviation history, the infamous JAL123.
 
B777LRF
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 5:46 am

DC-9-21. A short body with the large wings and engines from the -41. Developed specifically for SAS to be used on shorter airfields, especially in Norway. Was known locally as the Porsche of Santa Monica.
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Prost
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 5:52 am

Boeing developed the 707-138 specifically for Qantas,
 
cschleic
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 5:58 am

Wasn't the DC-10-40 developed for Northwest which specified P&W engines vs. the standard GE? Although at least one other airline ordered it after that.
 
sparky35805
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 6:20 am

Go way back.Boeing 247 for United,DC-2 for TWA,and DC-3/DST for American.Later on ,the DC-7 for American.
 
slcguy
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 6:31 am

The Lockheed Constellation for TWA. Howard Hughes who ran TWA at the time dictated a lot of the specs the plane had to meet.
Last edited by slcguy on Tue May 21, 2019 6:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
 
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vhqpa
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 6:35 am

Does the HS 121 Trident count? It was initially supposed to be larger but it was shrunken with less powerful engines at the request of BEA. Many potential export customers were put off the changes and ordered the 727 instead.
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Gemuser
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 6:38 am

Prost wrote:
Boeing developed the 707-138 specifically for Qantas,

Not really, its more complicated than that. QF ordered the orginal length B707-120, Boeing then, in consulations with various airlines developed a longer version, every airline except QF switched their orders to the longer version. The longer version had a shorter range, I forget how much but it was enough to render it usless on the QF Pacific routes, so Boeing produced the short body version for QF, no other airline ordered it so it became a QF one off.

Gemuser
 
Arion640
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 6:46 am

If the 767-400ER gets an honourable mention, then so does Concorde probably.
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Riorei
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 6:53 am

The Dassault Mercure for Air Inter
 
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Phosphorus
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 6:56 am

In Britain, VC-10 specs were tweaked around BOAC demands, AFAIK. To the point where many other airlines were no longer interested, as BOAC wanted performance from hot and high airfields, to the detriment of operational economics.

All Soviet types, predictably, were developed to Aeroflot requirements.
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filipinoavgeek
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 7:01 am

Arion640 wrote:
If the 767-400ER gets an honourable mention, then so does Concorde probably.


Concorde didn't really count: when it was initially produced it was not intended solely for BOAC/AF and in fact numerous airlines had orders for it, only for the others to drop out due to economic and political pressures.

Riorei wrote:
The Dassault Mercure for Air Inter

Like I mentioned in the OP post, Air Inter became the sole operator of the Mercure, but it wasn't intended to be that way: Dassault designed it with hopes of having numerous customers and shopped it around, but was crippled with design flaws such as its low range (to the point that it was joked that it would never be successful as it didn't have the range to leave France), which prevented it from gaining traction.
 
adammsvk1
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 7:15 am

That Cessna developed specifically for FedEx https://about.van.fedex.com/newsroom/fe ... -aircraft/
 
Arniepie
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 7:23 am

AFAIK, the B737MAX-200 is a subtype specifically created for RYANAIR .
[edit post]
 
rbavfan
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 7:28 am

Arion640 wrote:
If the 767-400ER gets an honourable mention, then so does Concorde probably.


Concorde was never developed for 2 airlines. The noise levels & oil crisis caused airlines to drop orders.
 
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Veigar
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 7:34 am

747SP for PA?
 
filipinoavgeek
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 7:40 am

Veigar wrote:
747SP for PA?

IIRC it was also made at least partly due to Iran Air (they needed a plane that could fly Tehran - New York non-stop)
 
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Spiderguy252
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 7:51 am

The A330-300R for Saudia.
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Arion640
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 7:53 am

rbavfan wrote:
Arion640 wrote:
If the 767-400ER gets an honourable mention, then so does Concorde probably.


Concorde was never developed for 2 airlines. The noise levels & oil crisis caused airlines to drop orders.


I know - but they tried hard to sell it to others, same with the 764.
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aviationaware
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 7:54 am

The initial 737 was quasi spec-made for Lufthansa. Surprised nobody has mentioned that yet. As was the initial 747 for Pan Am.
 
ChristianL1011
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 8:11 am

cschleic wrote:
Wasn't the DC-10-40 developed for Northwest which specified P&W engines vs. the standard GE? Although at least one other airline ordered it after that.


I think that other carrier was Japan Air Lines.
 
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RWA380
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 10:26 am

filipinoavgeek wrote:
Veigar wrote:
747SP for PA?

IIRC it was also made at least partly due to Iran Air (they needed a plane that could fly Tehran - New York non-stop)


I agree with you in fact, that several carriers including IR wanted a couple SP's for (at that time) ULH routes, once the plane had been given the nod from Boeing Execs & it was being made, like the original 747, but lesser so, it seemed multiple carriers wanted 2-5 of them.

But indeed it was upon the insistance of PA that Boeing was pressured into finding a 747 varient that could regularly fly JFK-NRT & LAX-SYD non-stop with no more unscheduled & scheduled, middle of the night fueling stops, of course QF also bought a few for LAX as well, plus JNB as well, TW had a couple, BN had a few, SA used them for their marathon diverts around the horn of Africa.
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 10:26 am

Veigar wrote:
747SP for PA?


There was a number of airlines at the time which had similar demands, so they 747SP can't really be seen as developped for one airline. Qantas suddenly managed to fly across the Pacific without stopping in New Zealand and/or Hawaii and with all the political pressure, South African Airways required the SP type to be able to fly all around Africa instead of straight across.

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RWA380
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 10:38 am

rbavfan wrote:
Arion640 wrote:
If the 767-400ER gets an honourable mention, then so does Concorde probably.


Concorde was never developed for 2 airlines. The noise levels & oil crisis caused airlines to drop orders.


We see the SQ concorde which was just BA's & the BN concorde that wasn't ever painted that was, but only had subtitles & a US reg number stuck on at IAD. Other than the Pepsi concorde, did any other SST fly with any corporate image or special livery?

Secondly, how many carriers planned on buying the concorde? Just like the 747sp, I would expect each carrier to have a very small sub-fleet of SST aircraft. During the time SST was being developed I know Boeing had their own program. I saw a CO d from the 50's-60's depicting, multiple golden bird tails on multiple Boeing SST aircraft, both at the gates & taking off, it was quite the SST fantasy.

Gemuser wrote:
Prost wrote:
Boeing developed the 707-138 specifically for Qantas,

Not really, its more complicated than that. QF ordered the orginal length B707-120, Boeing then, in consulations with various airlines developed a longer version, every airline except QF switched their orders to the longer version. The longer version had a shorter range, I forget how much but it was enough to render it usless on the QF Pacific routes, so Boeing produced the short body version for QF, no other airline ordered it so it became a QF one off.

Gemuser


Thanks for the history, it fully explains the shorter QF 707's, which IMHO was a sexier bird. Totsally appreciate your years of history that you nicely share with us here, it's appreciated by this guy.

cschleic wrote:
Wasn't the DC-10-40 developed for Northwest which specified P&W engines vs. the standard GE? Although at least one other airline ordered it after that.


Must have been, weren't they the only carrier to fly it?

B777LRF wrote:
DC-9-21. A short body with the large wings and engines from the -41. Developed specifically for SAS to be used on shorter airfields, especially in Norway. Was known locally as the Porsche of Santa Monica.


Freaking awesome, I always wondered why it seemed the 20 series was skipped, never understood why. Thanks for the cool contribution. Would have gone out of my way to find a flight, had I been aware. I am chasing my 737-600 in Canada with WS very soon.
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Philippine747
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 10:44 am

The Boeing 757-200M was designed at the request of Royal Nepal Airlines.
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 10:57 am

RWA380 wrote:
B777LRF wrote:
DC-9-21. A short body with the large wings and engines from the -41. Developed specifically for SAS to be used on shorter airfields, especially in Norway. Was known locally as the Porsche of Santa Monica.


Freaking awesome, I always wondered why it seemed the 20 series was skipped, never understood why. Thanks for the cool contribution. Would have gone out of my way to find a flight, had I been aware. I am chasing my 737-600 in Canada with WS very soon.


It was also called the DC-9 Sport or Raketen (The Rocket). Here is a video of it from an airshow: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pj51bfKPckg
 
Guillaume787
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 11:06 am

Bostrom wrote:
RWA380 wrote:
B777LRF wrote:
DC-9-21. A short body with the large wings and engines from the -41. Developed specifically for SAS to be used on shorter airfields, especially in Norway. Was known locally as the Porsche of Santa Monica.


Freaking awesome, I always wondered why it seemed the 20 series was skipped, never understood why. Thanks for the cool contribution. Would have gone out of my way to find a flight, had I been aware. I am chasing my 737-600 in Canada with WS very soon.


It was also called the DC-9 Sport or Raketen (The Rocket). Here is a video of it from an airshow: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pj51bfKPckg


Pretty neat video! That take off - quite a rocket indeed!
 
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flyingphil
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 11:13 am

Boeing produced the 747-100SR (Short Range) for the Japanese domestic market. Strengthened structure and undercarriage. This was followed later by the 747-400D (Domestic) for Japan Airlines.

The VC10 was produced for BOAC and had a thicker high lift wing so it could operate out of hot and high airports like Joburg and Nairobi.. unfortunately it meant it was not as efficient as the B707 for normal operations.
 
clipperlondon
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 11:20 am

CRJ900 wrote:
Caravelle 12 was developed for Sterling Airways, which was a big Caravelle 10B operator and wanted more seating capacity. Sterling ordered 12 but took only 7, the other five went to Air Inter. Sterling flew them 12 years and then they went to Air Inter and/or Air Mediterranee.


I was lucky enough to travel on both types on a trip from Manchester to Marseilles. Mercure from Paris and Caravelle 12 on the way back, both Air Inter. Can't remember the Manchester- CDG Air France but possibly a 727. Still, quite exciting to go on Air Inter though. The Mercure looked odd inside. It had 'bare' looking seating, I nearly expected parachutes to be handed out :smile:
 
nikeherc
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 12:11 pm

As far as I know, the Martin, Sikorsky and Boeing clippers were built for Pan Am. I know that’s going back a ways, but an earlier poster mentioned the DC-2 and the DST or DC-3.
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klm617
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 12:15 pm

The DC-10-40D and the 747-300SR for Japan Airlines and the 747-400D for All-Nippon and Japan Airlines. The 707-400 for BOAC, The Carvair for British Air Ferries the Rombac-111 for Tarom. Just about every Soviet passenger aircraft for Aeroflot the HAL-748 for Indian Airlines. The 747-100 Combi for Sabena. The Argonaut DC-4M for Canadian Pacific.
Last edited by klm617 on Tue May 21, 2019 12:26 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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citationjet
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 12:21 pm

Braniff was the only airline to order the 707-227, which had more powerful engines specifically requested by Braniff. No other airline ordered that version of the 707.
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leleko747
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 12:37 pm

Not sure if it fits the thread, but the Short Field Performance (SFP) package for the Boeing 737-800 was developed by Boeing specially after a request from Gol, because they wanted to operate the B737-800 in short runways, specially Santos Dumont (SDU) airport, which have a 1323m (4341ft) runway.

So not really a new type, but an enhancement requested by a sole airline.
I wonder when people will understand:
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Crackshot
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 12:43 pm

RWA380 wrote:
of course QF also bought a few for LAX as well, plus JNB as well


Interestingly, a big reason in picking the SP was for their flights to Wellington, as Qantas was an all-widebody airline at the time.
 
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ClassicLover
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 12:47 pm

Joelatbsl wrote:
There was a number of airlines at the time which had similar demands, so they 747SP can't really be seen as developed for one airline. Qantas suddenly managed to fly across the Pacific without stopping in New Zealand and/or Hawaii and with all the political pressure, South African Airways required the SP type to be able to fly all around Africa instead of straight across.


Qantas bought theirs to fly to Wellington in New Zealand, of all things. The runway there was too short for the Boeing 747-200B, so they bought SPs for that. The only reason they started to be used on SYD-LAX non-stop was in response to Pan Am doing that with their SPs.
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Crackshot
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 12:50 pm

leleko747 wrote:
Not sure if it fits the thread, but the Short Field Performance (SFP) package for the Boeing 737-800 was developed by Boeing specially after a request from Gol, because they wanted to operate the B737-800 in short runways, specially Santos Dumont (SDU) airport, which have a 1323m (4341ft) runway.

So not really a new type, but an enhancement requested by a sole airline.


Also along this line, the gravel kit used by Alaska Airlines and several Canadian arctic carriers for the 737-200,
 
burnsie28
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 1:03 pm

DC-10-40 for NW
 
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Channex757
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 1:23 pm

flyingphil wrote:
Boeing produced the 747-100SR (Short Range) for the Japanese domestic market. Strengthened structure and undercarriage. This was followed later by the 747-400D (Domestic) for Japan Airlines.

The VC10 was produced for BOAC and had a thicker high lift wing so it could operate out of hot and high airports like Joburg and Nairobi.. unfortunately it meant it was not as efficient as the B707 for normal operations.

The VC-10 was built for the old Empire routes, principally then operated by BUA. The Boeing Only Airline Company (an old internal joke!) did their best to get out of the VC-10 order as they wanted the 707 instead.

It's an interesting debate but if the VC-10 was built for anyone in particular it would be Freddie Laker at BUA.
 
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TheFlyingDisk
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 1:29 pm

Phosphorus wrote:
In Britain, VC-10 specs were tweaked around BOAC demands, AFAIK. To the point where many other airlines were no longer interested, as BOAC wanted performance from hot and high airfields, to the detriment of operational economics.


So BOAC tweaked the specs to suit their needs, and then the same airline chose to badmouth the plane due to disadvantages in the plane over the 707, caused by design compromises made to fit their own requirement?

The people running BOAC certainly doesn't make sense.
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flyingphil
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 1:36 pm

Phosphorus wrote:
In Britain, VC-10 specs were tweaked around BOAC demands, AFAIK. To the point where many other airlines were no longer interested, as BOAC wanted performance from hot and high airfields, to the detriment of operational economics.

Yes.. seems crazy now
BOAC were strong armed into ordering the VC10 and the Super VC10 later.

There was a story that a BEA wanted an airliner with a certain odd number of seats.. when queried why they wanted that number it was because it was the same number of seats on the coaches they used to take the passengers to the airplane. Its a good story.. may even be true!
 
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ojjunior
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 1:40 pm

Spiderguy252 wrote:
The A330-300R for Saudia.

Which model is this?
What's the "R" for?
 
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AECM
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 1:44 pm

ojjunior wrote:
Spiderguy252 wrote:
The A330-300R for Saudia.

Which model is this?
What's the "R" for?


Regional

https://www.airbus.com/newsroom/press-releases/en/2016/08/airbus-delivers-world-s-first-a330-300-regional-to-saudi-arabian-airlines.html
Last edited by AECM on Tue May 21, 2019 1:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Phosphorus
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 1:44 pm

TheFlyingDisk wrote:
Phosphorus wrote:
In Britain, VC-10 specs were tweaked around BOAC demands, AFAIK. To the point where many other airlines were no longer interested, as BOAC wanted performance from hot and high airfields, to the detriment of operational economics.


So BOAC tweaked the specs to suit their needs, and then the same airline chose to badmouth the plane due to disadvantages in the plane over the 707, caused by design compromises made to fit their own requirement?

The people running BOAC certainly doesn't make sense.


They do make sense, in a perverse sort of way. As posters upthread mentioned, they wanted Boeing 707's, so initially VC-10 was specialized away into a niche for SOME Empire routes, and then that same specialization was used against VC-10 to argue against further orders of the type. BOAC wanted it dead and buried, and so it happened.
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 1:44 pm

The Douglas DC-3 was developed at the urging of C.R.Smith of American Airlines as the DST Douglas Sleeper Transport. No other aircraft has had as big of an impact on commercial aviation than the DC-3. It was the first airliner that gave the airlines the ability to make a profit and ushered in the age of air travel for the masses.
 
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 2:11 pm

Not mainline sized, but the Cessna 408 is being developed by Textron largely based on requirements for FedEx, and they’re working closely with FedEx on this.

Also, if we’re talking about the VC-10, what about the One Eleven?
 
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 2:31 pm

A320-100 was only operated by BA and Air Inter, later AF
Indian Airlines, later AI operated A320-200's with double-bogie mains.
 
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Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 2:37 pm

RWA380 wrote:

Secondly, how many carriers planned on buying the concorde?


At it's peak, Concorde had booked just over 100 orders from virtually all the worlds' major airlines, including all the big US and Euro carriers. Then sh1t happened in Israel, the Arabs cut off the oil supplies and the world entered a recession in 1972, prompting all but BOAC and Air France to cancel their orders. Well, technically speaking Iran Air never cancelled theirs, but other events dictated the order was never fulfilled.
Signature. You just read one.
 
JRadier
Posts: 3952
Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2004 11:36 pm

Re: Airline types developed specifically for one carrier

Tue May 21, 2019 3:12 pm

leleko747 wrote:
Not sure if it fits the thread, but the Short Field Performance (SFP) package for the Boeing 737-800 was developed by Boeing specially after a request from Gol, because they wanted to operate the B737-800 in short runways, specially Santos Dumont (SDU) airport, which have a 1323m (4341ft) runway.

So not really a new type, but an enhancement requested by a sole airline.

It was indeed designed for Gol, but later picked up by amongst others TUI.

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