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Airline-specific lingo

Posted: Tue Dec 01, 2020 5:17 pm
by maps4ltd
When I fly American, two things stand out to me: the use of "record locator" for confirmation number, and telling standby/non-rev pax to "recheck" when they're cleared. I know the former is used elsewhere, but I haven't heard the latter outside of American. Does anyone have knowledge on how these airline-specific terms came to be, or other airlines that use specific jargon?

Re: Airline-specific lingo

Posted: Tue Dec 01, 2020 9:45 pm
by PI4EVR
Record Locator has always referred to the PNR - Passenger Name Record - for a confirmed reservation, and is widely used in the airline and travel industry that resulted when automated reservation systems were created in the late 60's. I think the use of "confirmation number" came about when online bookings became common and passengers actually saw a confirmation code or number when the booking was completed.
As to non-rev I've not experienced a "recheck" when you're actually cleared and assigned a seat. It's then more like "See ya bye."
I've been told to "check back" to see if other seats open up or if they are waiting for a late connection passenger/s to show up, but not when a boarding pass is issued.

Re: Airline-specific lingo

Posted: Wed Dec 02, 2020 6:56 pm
by drdisque
I think "recheck" may also be because AA was among one of the last carriers to get many types of non-revs off paper tickets and onto e-tickets. I never worked for AA, but when I flew in to interview with them I had a NRPS paper ticket and when I flew them using a ZED fare it was again on a paper ticket. The time I used a ZED was particularly frustrating as they never called my name even though there was space on the plane, I only got on because I approached the podium at final boarding call with my paper ticket and DM card and asked if there was still space. They subsequently gave me a seat assignment someone was sitting in (but luckily I was able to find a better seat).

Their departure control system has always seemed very inefficient to me. As another example, one time I was bumped on an XNA-ORD flight due to weight restrictions. They rebooked me XNA-DFW-ORD and actually had to hold the XNA-DFW flight solely because it took their gate agent so long to print out my voucher and new boarding passes. 4 of us were bumped - myself who was flying nonstop, but got booked to connect, 2 guys flying XNA-ORD-SDF rebooked to XNA-DFW-SDF (they probably got in the same time they would have through ORD), and a guy who was supposed to fly XNA-ORD-MQT - whom I have no clue how they rebooked, he probably had to spend the night.

Re: Airline-specific lingo

Posted: Wed Dec 02, 2020 7:25 pm
by maps4ltd
PI4EVR wrote:
Record Locator has always referred to the PNR - Passenger Name Record - for a confirmed reservation, and is widely used in the airline and travel industry that resulted when automated reservation systems were created in the late 60's. I think the use of "confirmation number" came about when online bookings became common and passengers actually saw a confirmation code or number when the booking was completed.
As to non-rev I've not experienced a "recheck" when you're actually cleared and assigned a seat. It's then more like "See ya bye."
I've been told to "check back" to see if other seats open up or if they are waiting for a late connection passenger/s to show up, but not when a boarding pass is issued.

Usually what I hear is something along the lines of "Standby passenger John Doe, please recheck at the podium." I've heard it said for nonrevs too.

Re: Airline-specific lingo

Posted: Tue Dec 08, 2020 2:52 pm
by departedflights
I don't think I have ever heard the phrase "gate house" anywhere but Delta.

Re: Airline-specific lingo

Posted: Tue Dec 08, 2020 6:49 pm
by andz
Not airline-specific but at DUR they announce "(flight number) a departure flight to XXX" which is just terrible English.

At the old ELS departures they used to ask departing passengers to "take their leave of friends and loved ones" which struck me as a bit morbid.

Re: Airline-specific lingo

Posted: Fri Dec 11, 2020 10:59 pm
by spartanmjf
"Unexpected rough air." Delta