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UAL747
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Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 12:13 am

Okay, I admit it. I'm freaked out by turbulence. I can handle light chop, but every time that seat belt sign comes on, over water, in the middle of the night, I get a bit tense. My tension only gets worse when the captain comes over the loudspeaker and says, "Flight attendants, please take your seats," because then I know it's bad.

I'm a little hypersensitive to movement of the aircraft. For instance, I can feel the plane slowly move up and down before entering any period of unstable air. It's like low frequency, low amplitude waves. Very elongated motion, and then the chop starts.

I flew to SYD and back this past week and heading down to SYD from LAX, it got very rough around the equator. So much so that I felt myself gripping the seat back in front of me with white knuckles. The seat belt sign came on, and the F/A's were seating for what seemed like forever. It was dark, except for flashes of lightening.

What happens when you are in the middle of nowhere and turbulence like this happens. You are heavy at the time, so you cannot go up, and you basically have no contact with ground control, and are only relying on reports from pilots ahead of you. I know that there were several planes ahead of us headed to Australia. Saw them take off. But what factors decide what you do in cases of heavy turbulence. Can we get some definitions of what is light, moderate, heavy, and severe?

I know I shouldn't freak out, but I start think of the AF flight from Brazil, and I see that big 747 wing flopping about and the outer engine dangling and it makes my heart skip a beat. I shouldn't be like this, but I had a very bad experience on a private aircraft where we were cleared to OKC but hit a gust front of a storm and it felt like we hit a brick wall. Luggage and briefcases flew forward and hit the cockpit window. That and a really turbulent 737 flight from DEN.

So aside from the above question, how do you deal with being scared of it? I know everyone says turbulence is usually nothing, but it scares the crap out of me at times. I have flashbacks of riding Space Mountain at Disney World. A roller coaster in the dark.

UAL
"Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy. Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy.....Okay, fine, we'll just turn 190 and Visual Our Way
 
jetblueguy22
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 12:17 am

I just try to relax. In my head i just see it as an inconvenience. The chances of having an AF447 like accident isn't very likely. Plus wasn't it because of airspeed indications? You just have to clear your head and not worry. I know its easier said than done but it can actually be fun. Oh and just don't look at the wings. i freak out a bit too but they will have to go way up or down before they would break.
Blue
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B6JFKH81
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 12:23 am

I know this is going to make me sound like an @ss, but I actually get the giggles when I start hitting the bumps. It isn't nervous laughter either...it's actually giggles from the little butterfly feeling I get in the stomach from the bumps. I kinda enjoy turbulence!
"If you do not learn from history, you are doomed to repeat it"
 
Daysleeper
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 12:40 am

Quoting B6JFKH81 (Reply 2):
I know this is going to make me sound like an @ss, but I actually get the giggles when I start hitting the bumps. It isn't nervous laughter either...it's actually giggles from the little butterfly feeling I get in the stomach from the bumps. I kinda enjoy turbulence!

Me too, actually I'd go so far as to say I look forwards to it and am sometimes disapointed if its smooth flying.

The worst/best I have ever been though was on a BA744 going from LHR to JFK, They actually turned off the main cabin lights as they started to flicker and it was bothering people... and then they told me and my new Austrailian buddy to shut up as we were bothering people   - We were acting as if on a roller-coaster, putting our hands up in the air as we lost altitude and cheering, and I'm not usually that much of a t*at. But we had been delayed because of a ramp agent strike, so I had perhaps had one or two too many southern comforts .......

As for what counts as "mild" "moderate" etc, I'm not sure - I guess it comes down to personal opinion at the end of the day.
 
OlympicATH
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 12:48 am

Hey there UAL747. Turbulence can freak me out too sometimes but you should just relax and realize this happens on hundreds of flights every day. My trick is to look at the F/As. They've been on thousands of flights so if they look totally relaxed (maybe even a little tired or bored) and just keep on doing their jobs then you have absolutely nothing to worry about.
As for the wing flex, I believe a 747 has a maximum wingtip deflection (maximum high to minimum low) of over 8 meters (around 26 feet). That probably never even happens so, really, you've got nothing to worry about.
 
richm
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:04 am

I'm the opposite, I love turbulence! I just find it a really fascinating experience, in the same way that I find it fascinating to be aboard a ship in rough seas!

When I was much younger, (early teens) it used to frighten me a little. But after learning that planes are built to withstand it, it doesn't bother me. In some ways, I compare it to driving over bumps on the road. Most of us trust that the shock absorbers will do their job, while others don't even give it a second thought.

Of course, things can go wrong, but the same can be said for most things in life. I know it's easier said than done, but try not to worry about it.
 
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cedars747
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:12 am

Quoting B6JFKH81 (Reply 2):
I know this is going to make me sound like an @ss, but I actually get the giggles when I start hitting the bumps. It isn't nervous laughter either...it's actually giggles from the little butterfly feeling I get in the stomach from the bumps. I kinda enjoy turbulence!


Exactly the same for me ! I enjoy turbulence to the point that without it my flight wont be perfect ,by the way I am traveling in one hour 
Tengo una pasion por la aviacion /لدي شغف للطيران / I have a passion for aviation /Jeg har en lidenskap for luftfart/ J'ai une passion pour l'aviation.
 
shankly
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:20 am

I was on QR002 over northern europe on 9th June.

Sat in the back of the A330-300 and truly had the wildest ride of my life...yaw, massive pitch and bank moments. For 20 minutes i wished i was somewhere else, but at the same time realised the boys up front were on the ball and that it probably would be ok....which of course it was

Even for regular pax turbulence can be uncomfortable but what always comforts me is that the crew see this every day and that its part of the normal world of flying
L1011 - P F M
 
c5load
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:31 am

Anytime I think of turbulence, I always remind myself that the airplane is still moving forward, there is still air flowing under the wings, and we are flying at 500 mph. So not much is going to happen as far as a catastrophe. But I also will admit sometimes when we are over the Atlantic at night coming home or going over to Europe, something will cross my mind and someone please tell me if I am crazy so I can stop thinking about it: The jackscrew in the elevator. The C-5 is a t-tail and it has that mechanism, and it scares me sometimes.
"But this airplane has 4 engines, it's an entirely different kind of flying! Altogether"
 
UAL747
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:35 am

Quoting c5load (Reply 8):
The jackscrew in the elevator. The C-5 is a t-tail and it has that mechanism, and it scares me sometimes.

I only think of that on T-Tails. ie, Alaska Airlines 261.....Funny though, that did cross my mind on the 747 across the Pacific. Not sure why.
"Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy. Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy.....Okay, fine, we'll just turn 190 and Visual Our Way
 
BW424
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:36 am

Quoting richm (Reply 5):
I'm the opposite, I love turbulence! I just find it a really fascinating experience, in the same way that I find it fascinating to be aboard a ship in rough seas!

Same here! I love turbulence as it makes the flight a bit more eventful. Now I know I'm not that crazy.
It is what we think we know already that prevents us from learning.......
 
PGNCS
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:44 am

Quoting c5load (Reply 8):
But I also will admit sometimes when we are over the Atlantic at night coming home or going over to Europe, something will cross my mind and someone please tell me if I am crazy so I can stop thinking about it: The jackscrew in the elevator. The C-5 is a t-tail and it has that mechanism, and it scares me sometimes.

Incorrectly maintained components break. Lessons were learned about the mechanisms and maintenance of the components involved, but it in no way implies that the concept is to be feared.

Translation, you aren't crazy, but relax: it'll be fine!
 
UAL747
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:45 am

Quoting PGNCS (Reply 11):
Incorrectly maintained components break. Lessons were learned

Perhaps I'm afraid I'm going to be on board the next "Lesson to be learned."
"Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy. Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy.....Okay, fine, we'll just turn 190 and Visual Our Way
 
kdeg00
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:46 am

I learned to relax through turbulence after jumpseating on a Falcon 50. Watching the pilots calmly work through their checklists prior to approach while we were hopping around made me realize that what I had previously perceived as scary and dangerous was routine for people with vastly more experience.

Now, I almost look forward to bumping around, though admittedly I prefer it more at altitude than on approach. I find light to moderate chop helps me sleep on longer flights. Kind of like a bunk on a rocking sailboat, I suppose. My only real fear these days is for the cabin crew who may be up and about during unexpected clear air turbulence.
AS 75K, DL Gold, BA Silver
 
swiftski
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:47 am

Maybe have a read up on Static and Dynamic Stability in an Aerody book/website. Once you have an understanding of how the aircraft design works, I think you will feel more comfortable. I can explain it here if needed.
 
PGNCS
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:53 am

Quoting UAL747 (Reply 12):
Quoting PGNCS (Reply 11):
Incorrectly maintained components break. Lessons were learned

Perhaps I'm afraid I'm going to be on board the next "Lesson to be learned."

That may be, but your chances are good not to be.

There's risk in everything. Even if you stay in your house all day long you can slip, fall, and die in the bathtub. People fear what they must, but c5load asked a specific question and I tried to address it honestly and reassuringly. I get in these machines every day (and have well over 10,000 hours flying the DC-9 and MD-80 family aircraft), and have great confidence in them, in my skills to fly them, and in the system to get me there safely. Statistics very much validate my confidence.
 
777fan
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 2:20 am

UAL747, rest assured, you're not alone. I've flown hundreds of thousands of miles, many of which were transoceanic flights at night and also get uneasy when the bumps increase to the point of the FAs having to take their seats. In my case, I definitely think it's a control thing; not knowing what the weather may/may not have in store, whether or not the crew is attempting to change their FL, deviate, or check ride reports, etc., drives me nuts.

In the case of UA, I find channel nine to be a valuable pacifier of sorts because it can offer a sneak preview of what's ahead, as well as reassurance that the crew is working to get out of the bad air. When that's not an option, I'll also take a peek at the ADDS/turbulence webpage so I have an idea of the ride on my prospective route. I typically don't worry about the aircraft's structural integrity and flight worthiness because I know that generally speaking, the aircraft are tested for conditions significantly worse than whatever is being thrown at me.

I've endured some hellacious turbulence on the SYD-HNL route and one particular AC 767-300 flight back in 2005 still serves as the most terrified I've ever been on a flight. We endured about four hours of consistent moderate to (probably) severe turbulence (despite the crew's efforts to climb above and descend below the strong jetstream which paralleled our route from the equator to a point about 500 miles SW of the Hawaiian Isles. The FAs were seated for several hours on end, the cabin was dead quiet save for occasional yelps/screams, and the sound of wind blasts rushing through the engines and/or hitting the fuselage as a crosswind. You could see the fuselage flexing ever so slightly on more than a few occasions. Nevertheless, we landed safely in HNL (I kissed the ground) and to this day, whenever it gets rough, I think back to that flight and know that whatever I'm enduring a) probably won't last as long as that ride, and b) probably won't be as uncomfortable.

Quoting kdeg00 (Reply 13):
My only real fear these days is for the cabin crew who may be up and about during unexpected clear air turbulence.

Totally agree. I think I actually get anxious just thinking about having to watch someone's head hit the cabin ceiling and/or having to clean up a mess of airborne food and drink service.

777fan
DC-8 61/63/71 DC-9-30/50 MD-80/82/83 DC-10-10/30 MD-11 717 721/2 732/3/4/5/G/8/9 741/2/4 752 762/3 777 A306/319/20/33 AT
 
JBirdAV8r
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 2:31 am

Quoting c5load (Reply 8):
something will cross my mind and someone please tell me if I am crazy so I can stop thinking about it: The jackscrew in the elevator. The C-5 is a t-tail and it has that mechanism, and it scares me sometimes.

Jackscrews are a very common, simple design element not only in airplanes, but many, many pieces of equipment. I designed a piece of equipment that translates a load of around 6,000 pounds using an acme screw assembly not all that dissimilar from the one on Alaska 261. The only problems come with its neglect--if you don't keep metal-on-metal parts lubricated, they will wear prematurely. So that problem boiled down to poor maintenance, not an inherent design flaw. I understand the feeling, though; sometimes when flying on the classic 737's I think about rudder hardovers. I don't really "fear" them, it's more anecdotal. "Hey, this aircraft type had a design flaw, it was corrected, and now here I sit."

Quoting UAL747 (Reply 12):
Perhaps I'm afraid I'm going to be on board the next "Lesson to be learned."

To expound a little on what PGNCS said:

Your life is always at risk from someone who might need to learn a "lesson." I could be killed tomorrow by some teenaged idiot doing 120 in his dad's Corvette. That is, sadly, MUCH more likely than getting on a jet and being killed as two experienced crewmembers fly the plane into a situation that exceeds its design limits.

Is it natural to be uncomfortable (as in "nervous") in turbulence? Of course it is. Even as a pilot, plowing headlong into a cloud, watching it grow darker around me, picking up heavier and heavier rain, and feeling the bumps grow in intensity puts me on guard (as it rightly should). I'm constantly evaluating the situation. I'm asking myself, how bad is it really? How's the airplane doing? Are conditions getting worse, or will they be better soon? Worst case scenario, how do I bail out of this situation (not literally of course   )?

I guess I say all that to say that if you notice it, the flight crew notices it, too--and they're checking to see what they can do to make the ride better for you, and maintaining an extremely safe environment for you at all times.
I got my head checked--by a jumbo jet
 
CXB77L
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 4:45 am

Turbulence doesn't frighten me as such, but it does make me feel uncomfortable because I'm prone to motion sickness. The only thing I'd clutch onto is the air sickness bag, although, thankfully, I've never had to use one on an airliner. The closest I've come to that was in 2001 when I was on an SQ A343 from ICN-YVR - we had what I'd consider moderate turbulence for what seemed like 30 minutes while flying over the Bering Sea. I don't like turbulence, but I'm not scared of it. I know that the plane I'm on was tested in conditions far worse than what I'm in, and that it wouldn't be certified for passenger transport if it wasn't safe.

How do deal with motion sickness is another problem, and one that has eluded me for years.
Boeing 777 fanboy
 
isitsafenow
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 12:48 pm

How do you deal with it....domestic?
Take Amtrak.
International?...I don't have an answer.

I look at it this way. At an amusement park like Ceder Point with 82 gazillion coasters or Kings Island,
you know where the bumps and dives are. In a plane, its more exciting because......you don't.
That's my philosophy on turbulence.
safe      
If two people agree on EVERYTHING, then one isn't necessary.
 
flybaurlax
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 3:01 pm

Quoting Daysleeper (Reply 3):
Me too, actually I'd go so far as to say I look forwards to it and am sometimes disapointed if its smooth flying.

I agree! I love eating in turbulence too! It makes it a little bit more of an interesting meal. I busted out some chinese food I brought on board while departing out of IND during some cool weather once and the woman next to me thought I was nuts eating int he turbulence we were flying through. I much prefer a flight with lots of bumps than one that gets very little turbulence. I just have full confidence in the engineering and maintenance.
Boilerup! Go Purdue!
 
lhr380
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 4:54 pm

I don't like it and do like it. I fortunate to have only been in BAD turbulence once, US 330 over NYC back in 2004. A few bins opened up, and I shut the blind (was over the wing and seeing it flex a bit was not that nice to watch)

I cant settle if the plane is moving even a little bit, on a recent LAS LHR flight I did not start getting any hint of sleep until after we left the Canadian coast line. On the recent 380 flights however, we hit some nice crosswinds at LHR and CDG, which made the plane do some stuff that was actually fun, sudden slight drops etc.
(The views on this site are my own and no one elses)
 
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September11
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 6:21 pm

Quoting UAL747 (Thread starter):
Okay, I admit it. I'm freaked out by turbulence.

Not me
Airliners.net of the Future
 
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September11
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 6:23 pm

I love turbulence! Watching people's reaction to turbulence is fun!
Airliners.net of the Future
 
747girl
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 8:41 pm

I'm not a fan of turblance either. On a recent flight from EWR, it got fairly bumpy and I let out a scream, much to the surprise of the passenger next to me! I felt moved to apologise to him and he said he didn't mind.
During turbulance, all the rational stuff I know about flying is forgotten about and images from 'Aircrash Investigation' replace them.
I working on it though!
 
rsrik
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 9:05 pm

I admit too - my dislike/fear for turbulence is a combination of what the OP + 747girl have written.

But, it will never keep me from flying  .

I have tried positive assurances such as "100s of planes go through this everday..." but when I look out the window and see the wings, the engines and other entities on the wing sway in every direction, that's when my assurances disapear. Lately, I have taken to shutting the window during turbulence so as to not feed my fear.

I am flying to south california tomorrow, and I can't wait  .

Sri
 
CRJ900
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 9:37 pm

UAL747, you have my sympathy... when I'm on duty as an FA, I hardly notice light turbulence except when my coffee spills all over the galley counter or I almost lose my balance and have to grab that full-size cart so it doesn't tilt and injure someone. Nuisance, in other words...

When I fly as a pax, I feel turbulence so much more, because I have zero control over the situation, my seat is the only thing I have to hold on to, the rest is up to the crew, sort of, hoping that they have everything under control.

It is true that many pax are comforted when they see cabin crews looking relaxed and potting around in the galleys, chatting and laughing. I try to walk through the cabin during light tubulence to show that "I'm here, don't worry", perhaps say a few words to anxious fliers and many pax have thanked me for that when deboarding.

I have experienced some pretty rough turbulence, both as an FA and pax and I do gasp at times, especially if I'm nearly thrown out of my jumpseat even though I'm strapped in tight. When talking to the pilots after landing, they usually shrug their shoulders and say "Nah, that wasn't any particular rough turbulence, it can get a lot worse."

I take comfort in knowing that aircraft are thoroughly built, they are simply fantastic machines that can take a hell of a beating, and most pilots are damn good at their job. I always feel safe when I work as an FA, and I think many pax notice that too and thus are able to relax more.  
Come, fly the prevailing winds with me
 
747girl
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 9:50 pm

Quoting rsrik (Reply 25):
But, it will never keep me from flying .

Me too!

Quoting CRJ900 (Reply 26):
I take comfort in knowing that aircraft are thoroughly built, they are simply fantastic machines that can take a hell of a beating, and most pilots are damn good at their job. I always feel safe when I work as an FA, and I think many pax notice that too and thus are able to relax more.

Well put, thank you!
 
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chepos
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Thu Jun 17, 2010 11:24 pm

I myself I'm not afraid of it, however, it makes my stomach a bit uncomfortable. I fly a couple of times a week and we usualy hit light chop here and there but I dont mind it. I did experience moderate turbulence from PHX to KOA a couple of months ago and of course we were in the middle of the pacific when all of a sdden the plane started bouncing. This lasted for an hour at least and you could see the people next to us clinging to the seatbacks and had a terriied looked on their face. At least the pilot had advised us of this as there were a couple of aircraft ahead of us experiencing this in adavcne.
I have been very lucky as most of my long hauls have been very smooth, I honestly can say that on my longest flight (SFO-DXB) 15 hours (give or take a few) I dont think we even encountered light chop. Smooth as silk.

Regards,

Chepos
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workwings
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Fri Jun 18, 2010 12:20 am

Thanks CRJ900! Here's a passenger who really appreciates the reassurance. I find that over the Atlantic eastbound at night, if I am stressed or tired, is the worst. I have had a few rough flights over the years, one recently (early May 2010) JFK to CDG, with about an hour of bouncing around. The pilot in welcoming us said first in French it would be severe turbulence, then in English he used the word moderate. The French was the correct version. It helped that we had the warning, and that it lasted about as long as predicted. The FAs couldn't walk around to reassure us because they were strapped in too...

My all time worst was on an approach to FCO about ten years ago. We for some reason dove right through a dark cloud, were hit by lightning, terribly rough. Lasted maybe 15 minutes, quite unpleasant. The fellow across the aisle waited for everyone else to deplane and had a blanket wrapped around him, poor guy.

So now when there is medium chop or turbulence and the FAs are still up and about I just remember that this is only minor...
 
daviation
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Fri Jun 18, 2010 1:10 pm

I love light turbulence. The motion actually puts me to sleep.

But telling you that there is nothing to worry about isn't going to help very much. I've been on some flights with moderate turbulence that annoyed me much more than they frightened me. I can only recall one flight out of hundreds that actually made me nervous (an AA DC-10 from BUF to LGA, flying through the soup until LGA reopened).

What about trying a Valium or Xanax? Or a glass of wine? These things can relax you, and once you start to travel more without anxious feelings, your apprehension will probably diminish.
PlaneFlown:717,727,737,747,757,767,777,DC8,DC9,DC10,L1011,F100,A300,319,320,321,330,340,CRJ,ERJ,E190,Av85,DH8,Beaver,ATR
 
ThirtyEcho
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Sat Jun 19, 2010 6:32 am

> Sit over the wing if you can. The sensation of movement is less.
> Avoid sitting in the rear of the cabin. The sensation of movement is much greater, especially in the yaw axis.
> Get the window seat. When you have a horizon reference that you can see you'll find that things are far more stable than your inner ear is telling you.
> Keep your seatbelt fastened at all times when you are seated.
> If it begins to get choppy, tighten the belt. You'll bounce around less in the seat.
> Avoid alcohol. It may relax you but it plays hob with your sense of balance. That is why drunks stagger.
> If you don't hear a power reduction when level, the folks on the flight deck don't expect much real turbulence.
> Flying through the tops of cumulus clouds is almost always bumpy. Pilots avoid cruising flight through the tops but it isn't always avoidable. If you see a cumulus top ahead, there will be bumps.
> Pilots avoid choppy air for passenger comfort, not safety. If yours was a cargo flight the pilots might not care about avoiding chop.
> There is continual conversation between pilots and ATC regarding "ride" reports from flights ahead of you and where smooth air is reported. Reqests to climb or descend are almost always granted.
 
StarAC17
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Sat Jun 19, 2010 5:04 pm

Quoting UAL747 (Thread starter):
I flew to SYD and back this past week and heading down to SYD from LAX, it got very rough around the equator. So much so that I felt myself gripping the seat back in front of me with white knuckles. The seat belt sign came on, and the F/A's were seating for what seemed like forever. It was dark, except for flashes of lightening.

Flying to and from the south pacific can get rough and I really don't mind the turbulence all that much but when flying to SYD and NAN from SFO and LAX the flights were steadily rough and I actually had motion problems after the fact for a day or so where I would feel the planes motion on a flat surface. Similar to anyone who has ever been on a cruise and they feel the motion of the ship for a few days after.

Strangely however my flights back from the south pacific to North America have been perfectly smooth.
Engineers Rule The World!!!!!
 
tommy767
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Sat Jun 19, 2010 6:36 pm

The thing I always wonder is how much pilots enjoy it? I was on a transcon with DL about a year ago from JFK-LAX and we flew through two very bad patches of thunderstorms over the midwest. It was pretty strong turbulence to the point where people were occasionally yelping in the back. I checked flight aware afterwords and there were three JFK-LAX planes departing at the same time and for some reason our plane and an AA 762 flew through the storms but a UA 757 literally flew south of it (flying time was 20 minutes longer.) Why did they get to avoid flying through the storms and we didn't? The pilot actually sounded excited when he told the f/a's to sit down and buckle up!
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Viscount724
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Sun Jun 20, 2010 10:36 pm

Quoting UAL747 (Thread starter):
Can we get some definitions of what is light, moderate, heavy, and severe?

Excerpt below with FAA definitions of turbulence intensity from the following document.
http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory...25710000679ae0/$FILE/AC120-88A.pdf


TURBULENCE INTENSITY

Light Chop. Slight, rapid, and somewhat rhythmic bumpiness without appreciable changes in altitude or attitude.

Light Turbulence. Slight, erratic changes in altitude and/or attitude. Occupants may feel a slight strain against seatbelts. Unsecured objects may be displaced slightly. Food service may be conducted and little to no difficulty is encountered in walking.

Moderate Chop. Rapid bumps or jolts without appreciable changes in aircraft altitude or attitude.

Moderate Turbulence. Changes in altitude and/or attitude occur but the aircraft remains in positive control at all times. It usually causes variations in indicated airspeed.Occupants feel definite strain against seatbelts. Unsecured objects are dislodged. Food service and walking are difficult.

Severe. Large, abrupt changes in altitude and/or attitude. Usually causes large variations in indicated airspeed. Aircraft may be momentarily out of control. Occupants are forced violently against seatbelts. Unsecured objects are tossed about. Food service and walking are impossible.

Extreme. Aircraft is violently tossed about and is practically impossible to control. May cause structural damage.
 
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aerdingus
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Mon Jun 21, 2010 2:13 pm

Ha, I used to be real scared, but then I got fed up bein on edge over a bumpy 7+ hr trans Atlantic flight, so I just gave in, and weirdly, enjoyed it! Another time it felt like a rocking chair & I fell asleep......
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travelavnut
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Mon Jun 21, 2010 2:36 pm

Quoting flybaurlax (Reply 20):
much prefer a flight with lots of bumps than one that gets very little turbulence. I just have full confidence in the engineering and maintenance.

I absolutly agree!! The more turbulent the better actually! Also I have full confidence in the engineering and airmanship.
There is this video on youtube (trying to find it right now) showing the control column movement of a DC-9 during modorate turbulence. Although you might think the airplane is shacking and moving all about this is actually not the case.
Live From Amsterdam!
 
Viscount724
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Mon Jun 21, 2010 11:01 pm

Quoting TravelAVNut (Reply 36):
Quoting flybaurlax (Reply 20):
much prefer a flight with lots of bumps than one that gets very little turbulence. I just have full confidence in the engineering and maintenance.

I absolutly agree!! The more turbulent the better actually!

Many people have been killed or seriously injured in turbulence encounters, and some aircraft have been lost, for example the BA 707 that disintegrated in severe turbulence soon after takeoff from HND in 1966, killing all 124 aboard.
 
travelavnut
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Tue Jun 22, 2010 1:19 pm

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 37):
Quoting TravelAVNut (Reply 36):
Quoting flybaurlax (Reply 20):
much prefer a flight with lots of bumps than one that gets very little turbulence. I just have full confidence in the engineering and maintenance.

I absolutly agree!! The more turbulent the better actually!

Many people have been killed or seriously injured in turbulence encounters, and some aircraft have been lost, for example the BA 707 that disintegrated in severe turbulence soon after takeoff from HND in 1966, killing all 124 aboard.

Yes..and? The 707 is more than 40 years ago. We now have very good WX radars, so that risk is mitigated.

And of course I´m not talking about severe or extreme turbulence. Just the shake-you-around-a-bit moderate chop.
Live From Amsterdam!
 
Viscount724
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Wed Jun 23, 2010 12:43 am

Quoting TravelAVNut (Reply 38):
Many people have been killed or seriously injured in turbulence encounters, and some aircraft have been lost, for example the BA 707 that disintegrated in severe turbulence soon after takeoff from HND in 1966, killing all 124 aboard.

Yes..and? The 707 is more than 40 years ago. We now have very good WX radars, so that risk is mitigated.

Weather radar doesn't help with clear air turbulence which can also be severe. There have been some recent events involving injuries during such encounters.
 
MadameConcorde
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RE: Turbulence...I Admit, I'm Afraid Of It

Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:02 pm

I absolutely love turbulence. The stronger, the longer, the better.
Subsonic flights are already boring as they are. I need turbulence to add a little spice to them.
There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde

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