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chrisnh
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Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:15 pm

On January 29 BA will fly the A380 to Boston, and back out again the next morning. This rotation is normally a 787-9, so it brings up the question: Will this flight have a cabin crew normal for a A380, or normal for a 787-9 load (which the flights most certainly will be)? It is clearly a familiarization trip (since the Boston gates are just about ready) rather than because of some curious spike in demand.
Last edited by chrisnh on Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
wn676
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:17 pm

chrisnh wrote:
On January 29 BA will fly the A380 to Boston, and back out again the next morning. This rotation is normally a 787-9, so it brings up the question: Will this flight have a cabin crew normal for a A380, or normal for a 787-9 load (which the flights most certainly will be)?


At a minimum it's always based on the aircraft/seating config, regardless of the load.
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mmo
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:21 pm

As this topic has been beaten to death, let's all get it out in the open one last time!

The requirement for cabin crews are based on the actual number of seats in the cabin. So, if the cabin has 151 seats and 1 passenger booked, then it will need 4 cabin crew. For each 50 SEATS, you need 1 cabin crew. So, if the 380 holds 402 seats, it's 9 cabin crew no matter how few passengers are booked.

The actual passenger load has nothing to do with the number of cabin crew required. The only factor driving the number of cabin crew are the number of seats divided by 50 rounded up to the next whole number.
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Dalmd88
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:26 pm

Since the crew likely stays in BOS and takes the return trip 24 hours later they will have to deadhead the extra crew members ahead of time. Same goes for the flight crew.
 
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:28 pm

That being said, in the US, if a carrier is repositioning or ferrying an aircraft, up to 19 non-revenue or employees may ride on the aircraft with no flight attendants at all. Similar to how the B-1900 and J-32 had no flight attendants. However if the number of non-revs goes over 19 the aircraft must have the full compliment of flight attendants.
 
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chrisnh
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:32 pm

Dalmd88 wrote:
Since the crew likely stays in BOS and takes the return trip 24 hours later they will have to deadhead the extra crew members ahead of time. Same goes for the flight crew.


Actually, the turn time will be around 11 hours; the inbound will land around 9pm and go back out around 8am the next morning.
 
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zeke
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:44 pm

mmo wrote:
As this topic has been beaten to death, let's all get it out in the open one last time!

The requirement for cabin crews are based on the actual number of seats in the cabin. So, if the cabin has 151 seats and 1 passenger booked, then it will need 4 cabin crew. For each 50 SEATS, you need 1 cabin crew. So, if the 380 holds 402 seats, it's 9 cabin crew no matter how few passengers are booked.

The actual passenger load has nothing to do with the number of cabin crew required. The only factor driving the number of cabin crew are the number of seats divided by 50 rounded up to the next whole number.


That is FAA, not relevent to BA.

Under JAR-OPS and EU-OPS a minimum number of one cabin crew member is required per door on the A380 under the twin isle rules, (100 lower deck and 6 upper deck).
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:58 pm

And don't even think about doing what Braniff did in the late 70's. We had a 727-100 with 103 seats. One flight attendant was hospitalized during the night with appendicitis and they could not get a replacement f/a to the station in time for the scheduled departure. So some not-so-smart guy gets the idea of removing one row of three seats and tossing them in the belly bin. He thought they would be reinstalled downline. They felt with only 100 seats they were good to go with just two f/a's. So off they went. FAA found out and was not amused. Aircraft was certificated for 103 seats and Braniff had to eat a huge fine. Especially since the flight actually operated.
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Wed Jan 11, 2017 9:59 pm

mmo wrote:
As this topic has been beaten to death, let's all get it out in the open one last time!

The requirement for cabin crews are based on the actual number of seats in the cabin. So, if the cabin has 151 seats and 1 passenger booked, then it will need 4 cabin crew. For each 50 SEATS, you need 1 cabin crew. So, if the 380 holds 402 seats, it's 9 cabin crew no matter how few passengers are booked.

The actual passenger load has nothing to do with the number of cabin crew required. The only factor driving the number of cabin crew are the number of seats divided by 50 rounded up to the next whole number.

In the United States ... but not everywhere else in the world.

In Canada it is 1 F/A per 50 seats only on narrow body aircraft. On two aisle aircraft, it is 1 F/A per 40 passengers, with a minimum compliment set per type and exit configuration. For example an A321 with 100 passengers must have 4 F/As as it has 185 seats. But ... a 767 with 100 passengers needs only 3 F/As even though it has 211 seats.

(The exception as noted on another thread, is that Air Canada Rouge operates under an exemption and its 767s operate with a minimum of 6 F/As regardless of number of seats or passengers.)
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 12:07 am

BA A380s require 22 cabin crew. It will always be that. It can do down due to sickness but only away from base. But leaving London it will always carry the 22!
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32andBelow
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 12:34 am

chrisnh wrote:
On January 29 BA will fly the A380 to Boston, and back out again the next morning. This rotation is normally a 787-9, so it brings up the question: Will this flight have a cabin crew normal for a A380, or normal for a 787-9 load (which the flights most certainly will be)? It is clearly a familiarization trip (since the Boston gates are just about ready) rather than because of some curious spike in demand.

Crew planning will plan the required crew for the aircraft type. They will not care, or might not even know that the same turn operated on a different type at a different time. Also not all crews are necessarily qualified for all aircraft types, so you may not even be able to use the same physical people.
 
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 1:50 am

longhauler wrote:
In the United States ... but not everywhere else in the world.


I know this is picky and Longhauler knows this but it has been the subject of some confusion in the past. It is NOT "in the USA', it is onboard USA registered aircraft operated by a USA certified airline. It does NOT apply to aircraft/airline registered/certified in another country even if it is operating to the USA.

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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:10 am

tonystan wrote:
BA A380s require 22 cabin crew. It will always be that. It can do down due to sickness but only away from base. But leaving London it will always carry the 22!


Huh?

What do you mean by; "It can do down due to sickness but only away from base" ?????
Does this mean that it can legally fly with less FA's if they get sick but only if they are away from base, because that really makes no sense at all?

You say, "Leaving London it will always carry the 22".
What about returning to London? Are the rules different depending on which direction the aircraft is flying?

Your post is very confusing and doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me, can you please clarify what it is that you were trying to say. I am also very interested in learning more about why the rules are different flying into or out of base, it seems to me that the safety of the aircraft wouldn't change at all just because there is a crew base........

Looking forward to your reply!
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:16 am

ual747den wrote:
tonystan wrote:
BA A380s require 22 cabin crew. It will always be that. It can do down due to sickness but only away from base. But leaving London it will always carry the 22!


Huh?

What do you mean by; "It can do down due to sickness but only away from base" ?????
Does this mean that it can legally fly with less FA's if they get sick but only if they are away from base, because that really makes no sense at all?

You say, "Leaving London it will always carry the 22".
What about returning to London? Are the rules different depending on which direction the aircraft is flying?

Your post is very confusing and doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me, can you please clarify what it is that you were trying to say. I am also very interested in learning more about why the rules are different flying into or out of base, it seems to me that the safety of the aircraft wouldn't change at all just because there is a crew base........

Looking forward to your reply!


I imagine that the 22 crew is based on union agreement, and not a legal requirement. Therefore, if a crew member falls ill at an outstation, they can fly back to LON with a crew of 21 working the flight, rather than end up canceling the flight. The legal requirement is probably lower than 22, so it would still be legal for the airline to fly with a smaller crew, as long as the crew meets (or exceeds) the legal minima. For example: Based on the legal requirement for one crew member per door on a WB stated above, the legal minimum on an A380 would be 16 crew.
 
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:33 am

At my airline there is the 1 for 50 rule, so 1 F/A for every 50 seats.
To determine the min required legal crew, we also take into account the number of doors on the aircraft...usually 1 per door. So a 767 will have a min legal crew of 5 an A330 will have a min crew of 7
At a certain point based on bookings and service level a load factor(s) will be added
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:49 am

If I was to work EWR-SAN-EWR on the 738 for example with only 35 pax going to SAN but 160 pax going to EWR we would still need the minimum of 4 FAs as the return leg would be full. So its based on number of seats on the aircraft not what the actual load is.
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 6:09 am

mmo wrote:
As this topic has been beaten to death, let's all get it out in the open one last time!

The requirement for cabin crews are based on the actual number of seats in the cabin. So, if the cabin has 151 seats and 1 passenger booked, then it will need 4 cabin crew. For each 50 SEATS, you need 1 cabin crew. So, if the 380 holds 402 seats, it's 9 cabin crew no matter how few passengers are booked.

The actual passenger load has nothing to do with the number of cabin crew required. The only factor driving the number of cabin crew are the number of seats divided by 50 rounded up to the next whole number.


O.K. But WHY is this the rule?

If the plane is sitting there ready to go, with 1 passenger and 15 empty seats, why would the law require 4 cabin crew. It would seem the requirement ought to be based on number of actual passengers, or number of door, but number of seats seems silly.

-Willing to be educated
 
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 6:31 am

kitplane01 wrote:
mmo wrote:
As this topic has been beaten to death, let's all get it out in the open one last time!

The requirement for cabin crews are based on the actual number of seats in the cabin. So, if the cabin has 151 seats and 1 passenger booked, then it will need 4 cabin crew. For each 50 SEATS, you need 1 cabin crew. So, if the 380 holds 402 seats, it's 9 cabin crew no matter how few passengers are booked.

The actual passenger load has nothing to do with the number of cabin crew required. The only factor driving the number of cabin crew are the number of seats divided by 50 rounded up to the next whole number.


O.K. But WHY is this the rule?

If the plane is sitting there ready to go, with 1 passenger and 15 empty seats, why would the law require 4 cabin crew. It would seem the requirement ought to be based on number of actual passengers, or number of door, but number of seats seems silly.

-Willing to be educated


In the event of an emergency crew members may not be able to operate the emergency exit nearest them, for a number of reasons. So whatever the load you need a minimum number of crew to operate the exits.

I have despatched flights where one crew member was sick and unable to work. It was still possible to operate the flight, but the maximum pax load had to be reduced and seats block in the vicinity of the exit which was now unattended.
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 6:41 am

One good reason would be that it stops airlines from cheating, and they did cheat in the past. If you have an unscrupulous airline, or one with an incompetent crewing department, they may end up with just 2 f/as to work a flight on a 150 seat aircraft. If the rules said this was OK as long as there were only 100 or fewer pax, how often do you think those planes would go out with over 100 passengers anyway unless an inspector was about, in which case there would be a sudden outbreak of bumping. The number of seats fitted is part of the aircraft's documentation, with duplicate copies filed with the national aviation authority. To change the number of seats an airline needs to apply in advance. The number of passengers onboard is far easier to fudge after the event if there's an enquiry, since the airline holds the records. Admittedly it was easier in the days of paper-based systems, but computer records can be edited...
 
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 6:42 am

zeke wrote:

That is FAA, not relevent to BA.

Under JAR-OPS and EU-OPS a minimum number of one cabin crew member is required per door on the A380 under the twin isle rules, (100 lower deck and 6 upper deck).


It is relevant, as the basic issue is it is NOT based on passengers onboard but what the seating or other theoretical limit is. Again, FA staffing is not based on the number of pax!!!!
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 6:54 am

mmo wrote:
As this topic has been beaten to death, let's all get it out in the open one last time!

The requirement for cabin crews are based on the actual number of seats in the cabin. So, if the cabin has 151 seats and 1 passenger booked, then it will need 4 cabin crew. For each 50 SEATS, you need 1 cabin crew. So, if the 380 holds 402 seats, it's 9 cabin crew no matter how few passengers are booked.

The actual passenger load has nothing to do with the number of cabin crew required. The only factor driving the number of cabin crew are the number of seats divided by 50 rounded up to the next whole number.


Its actually minimum 18 for an A380. 1 for each door and 1 on each side at the front of upper deck cabin for cabin supervision.
 
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 11:38 am

mmo wrote:
It is relevant, as the basic issue is it is NOT based on passengers onboard but what the seating or other theoretical limit is. Again, FA staffing is not based on the number of pax!!!!


The BA A380s have around 470 seats installed, the minimum number of 9-10 based according to the number of seats, it's based upon the number of doors under the twin isle rules.
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bjorn14
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 12:30 pm

A little bit OT, bt I see US carriers putting 12 FAs on a WB when only six are required. What's up with that?
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 1:31 pm

bjorn14 wrote:
A little bit OT, bt I see US carriers putting 12 FAs on a WB when only six are required. What's up with that?

Maybe because the kind of service which is offered to the passenger requires 12 FAs?
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 1:34 pm

tonystan wrote:
BA A380s require 22 cabin crew. It will always be that. It can do down due to sickness but only away from base. But leaving London it will always carry the 22!


That's not correct. The minimum flight manual crew complement is 18.

It just happens that the 'reduced' number down route is the same as the flight manual requirement so makes no difference.
 
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:56 pm

mmo wrote:
As this topic has been beaten to death, let's all get it out in the open one last time!

The requirement for cabin crews are based on the actual number of seats in the cabin. So, if the cabin has 151 seats and 1 passenger booked, then it will need 4 cabin crew. For each 50 SEATS, you need 1 cabin crew. So, if the 380 holds 402 seats, it's 9 cabin crew no matter how few passengers are booked.
.


I am confused.

Between late 2010 and late 2011 12 of the 19 surviving BA 734s were reconfigured. It was reported that they were fitted with Slim Back Y Class seats removed from retied 752s sold for freighter conversion to FedEx. The seat configuration of the converted 734s was reported to be:

Row 1: 3 34" pitch convertible seats (Seats D, E and F - no Seats A, B or C),
Rows 2 to 12: Each row with 3 - 3 34" pitch Convertible seats
Row 13: A, B and C 34"Convertible seats, D, E and F 31"pitch Slim-back seats
Row 14 to 27: Each row with 3 - 3 31" pitch Slim-back seats

This gives a total of up to 153 seats when none of the front rows are in C Class configuration. These seats included an additional 3 - 3 row of non-convertible seats theoretically adding six seats to the previous maximum all-Y Class 147

To address the issue of the number of required Cabin Crew for a 150+ seat (or passenger?) aircraft it was reported that BA totally blocked the sale of Seats 1B, 2B, 3B nd 4B even if the aircraft was otherwise in an all-Y configuration. Hence, depending on the arrangement of the Convertible seats, the maximum number of passengers would be between 129 (C48 / Y81) and 149 (C0 / Y149).

Perhaps the four rows with no B seat ever sold were permanently fixed so it was impossible to use the B seat?
 
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:58 pm

kitplane01 wrote:
mmo wrote:
As this topic has been beaten to death, let's all get it out in the open one last time!

The requirement for cabin crews are based on the actual number of seats in the cabin. So, if the cabin has 151 seats and 1 passenger booked, then it will need 4 cabin crew. For each 50 SEATS, you need 1 cabin crew. So, if the 380 holds 402 seats, it's 9 cabin crew no matter how few passengers are booked.

The actual passenger load has nothing to do with the number of cabin crew required. The only factor driving the number of cabin crew are the number of seats divided by 50 rounded up to the next whole number.


O.K. But WHY is this the rule?

If the plane is sitting there ready to go, with 1 passenger and 15 empty seats, why would the law require 4 cabin crew. It would seem the requirement ought to be based on number of actual passengers, or number of door, but number of seats seems silly.

-Willing to be educated


First off, these are flights that have been scheduled months in advance, the work schedules for the flight crew will have been done weeks or months in advance as well, and airlines try to plan for every reasonable eventuality. Let me see if I can provide a plausible real-world example: In early March of a year with almost no snow AA flies an MD80 DFW-RNO that has been going out 1/3 to 1/2 full every day. On Friday, a winter storm drops 6 feet of fresh powder on the slopes at Lake Tahoe and skiers across the country scramble to book a last-minute trip, so a Saturday flight that only had 50 pax on Friday morning is fully booked by departure time Saturday morning. Had AA only scheduled for the average # of pax, they'd be left scrambling for standby F/As to work the flight at the last minute, but since they scheduled by # of seats they're ready to roll when the time comes.
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zeke
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Fri Jan 13, 2017 4:20 am

vv701 wrote:
I am confused.


The reason you are confused is the FAA and EASA/JAR rules differ on the matter.


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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Fri Jan 13, 2017 7:03 am

TSS wrote:
kitplane01 wrote:
mmo wrote:
As this topic has been beaten to death, let's all get it out in the open one last time!

The requirement for cabin crews are based on the actual number of seats in the cabin. So, if the cabin has 151 seats and 1 passenger booked, then it will need 4 cabin crew. For each 50 SEATS, you need 1 cabin crew. So, if the 380 holds 402 seats, it's 9 cabin crew no matter how few passengers are booked.

The actual passenger load has nothing to do with the number of cabin crew required. The only factor driving the number of cabin crew are the number of seats divided by 50 rounded up to the next whole number.


O.K. But WHY is this the rule?

If the plane is sitting there ready to go, with 1 passenger and 15 empty seats, why would the law require 4 cabin crew. It would seem the requirement ought to be based on number of actual passengers, or number of door, but number of seats seems silly.

-Willing to be educated


First off, these are flights that have been scheduled months in advance, the work schedules for the flight crew will have been done weeks or months in advance as well, and airlines try to plan for every reasonable eventuality. Let me see if I can provide a plausible real-world example: In early March of a year with almost no snow AA flies an MD80 DFW-RNO that has been going out 1/3 to 1/2 full every day. On Friday, a winter storm drops 6 feet of fresh powder on the slopes at Lake Tahoe and skiers across the country scramble to book a last-minute trip, so a Saturday flight that only had 50 pax on Friday morning is fully booked by departure time Saturday morning. Had AA only scheduled for the average # of pax, they'd be left scrambling for standby F/As to work the flight at the last minute, but since they scheduled by # of seats they're ready to roll when the time comes.


Those are very good practical reasons for the airline to have a reasonable, practical policy. But they make less sense for reasons for a LAW.

Suppose, using your example, that a MD-80 DFW-RNO has an F/A call in sick or missing. And suppose that on this flight there are only 50 passengers in the seats. How come they could not dispatch that flight?
 
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Fri Jan 13, 2017 9:15 am

From the A380 type certificate:
https://www.easa.europa.eu/system/files ... Iss_09.pdf

Minimum Cabin Crew
In accordance with the following;
Installed Passenger Seats
Minimum Cabin Crew
Upper Deck
301 to 330
7
Upper Deck
300 or fewer
6*
Main Deck
501 to 538
11
Main Deck
500 or fewer
10
* An additional cabin crew is needed at the fwd stair if the number of installed seats fwd of
door U1 L/R is above 30.
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zeke
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Fri Jan 13, 2017 2:29 pm

speedygonzales wrote:
From the A380 type certificate:
https://www.easa.europa.eu/system/files ... Iss_09.pdf

Minimum Cabin Crew
In accordance with the following;
Installed Passenger Seats
Minimum Cabin Crew
Upper Deck
301 to 330
7
Upper Deck
300 or fewer
6*
Main Deck
501 to 538
11
Main Deck
500 or fewer
10
* An additional cabin crew is needed at the fwd stair if the number of installed seats fwd of
door U1 L/R is above 30.


That is exactly in line with the EASA evacuation rules. One can reduce the crew members further than the TCDS however it requires a design organisation to justify the certification basis is met.
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TSS
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Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Sat Jan 14, 2017 9:01 am

kitplane01 wrote:
TSS wrote:
kitplane01 wrote:

O.K. But WHY is this the rule?

If the plane is sitting there ready to go, with 1 passenger and 15 empty seats, why would the law require 4 cabin crew. It would seem the requirement ought to be based on number of actual passengers, or number of door, but number of seats seems silly.

-Willing to be educated


First off, these are flights that have been scheduled months in advance, the work schedules for the flight crew will have been done weeks or months in advance as well, and airlines try to plan for every reasonable eventuality. Let me see if I can provide a plausible real-world example: In early March of a year with almost no snow AA flies an MD80 DFW-RNO that has been going out 1/3 to 1/2 full every day. On Friday, a winter storm drops 6 feet of fresh powder on the slopes at Lake Tahoe and skiers across the country scramble to book a last-minute trip, so a Saturday flight that only had 50 pax on Friday morning is fully booked by departure time Saturday morning. Had AA only scheduled for the average # of pax, they'd be left scrambling for standby F/As to work the flight at the last minute, but since they scheduled by # of seats they're ready to roll when the time comes.


Those are very good practical reasons for the airline to have a reasonable, practical policy. But they make less sense for reasons for a LAW.

Suppose, using your example, that a MD-80 DFW-RNO has an F/A call in sick or missing. And suppose that on this flight there are only 50 passengers in the seats. How come they could not dispatch that flight?


I think you mean to ask "Why is it against the law for AA to dispatch that flight?". First, two relevant quotes: 1, "The law is like the jungle creeper- sooner or later it drapes across everyone's back", and 2, "Good fences make for good neighbors". If the law in question were written to apply to # of pax actually enplaned versus # of seats on the aircraft, then, aside from being a scheduling nightmare, there is great opportunity for less-than-perfectly-scrupulous carriers to "fudge" a bit here and there, such as if a flight with 50 pax and one F/A has a last-minute arrival just before the door is shut. Depending on the time of day, I'd expect any number of carriers might just carry on and take one pax over the limit rather than delay the flight while scrambling to find an extra F/A on extremely short notice. With the law written as is, while it doesn't make logical sense in every situation, it IS concrete, easy to understand, and there is no "grey area". If a plane has 150 seats, then it requires 3 F/As per flight, every flight, period, finito, no exceptions.

On a not-unrelated note, I think it should also be a law that aircraft be required to have one lav for every 50 seats as well (I'm lookin' at you, Southwest), but that's a different discussion for another thread.
Able to kill active threads stone dead with a single post!
 
YIMBY
Posts: 696
Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2016 4:32 pm

Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Tue Jan 17, 2017 7:12 pm

kitplane01 wrote:
mmo wrote:
As this topic has been beaten to death, let's all get it out in the open one last time!

The requirement for cabin crews are based on the actual number of seats in the cabin. So, if the cabin has 151 seats and 1 passenger booked, then it will need 4 cabin crew. For each 50 SEATS, you need 1 cabin crew. So, if the 380 holds 402 seats, it's 9 cabin crew no matter how few passengers are booked.

The actual passenger load has nothing to do with the number of cabin crew required. The only factor driving the number of cabin crew are the number of seats divided by 50 rounded up to the next whole number.


O.K. But WHY is this the rule?

If the plane is sitting there ready to go, with 1 passenger and 15 empty seats, why would the law require 4 cabin crew. It would seem the requirement ought to be based on number of actual passengers, or number of door, but number of seats seems silly.

-Willing to be educated


I have always understood that
1) there must be one competent crew member for every exit in a widebody and every pair of exits in a narrobody, to assist in evacuation, whatever pax/seat quantity,
2) the certification requires there to be a pair of exits for every 50 seat or so, but may depend somewhat on the size and accessibility of the exit door, and
3) the 50 seat rule being otherwise set by unions, as well as extra staff on long routes.

Have I been wrong? Surely the regulations vary country by country.

Could a country get an advantage by fine-tuning the national rule to fit the aircraft it produces or the configuration its national airline uses?
 
mutu
Posts: 498
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 7:04 am

Re: Cabin crew based on seats on plane or seats sold?

Tue Jan 31, 2017 3:37 pm

A BA A380 with 469 seats would require 10 cabin crew on the 50 pax FAA rule IF that rule were pertinent to that type (which I cant imagine it would be given the size of the craft) , 16 under the EASA 1 crew per door rule, and actually flies with 22

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