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Classa64
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Posts: 336
Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2015 5:40 pm

Way off the centerline on approach?

Sun Mar 05, 2017 3:22 pm

Came across this today; ( credit were it is due )

http://www.planeetiquette.com/crazy-foo ... nding-lot/

I mean this is seems WAY off!
I have no idea what happened and cant seem to find any reports or other info, but does this happen much?
And what could have been the issue?

C.
"Freedom is the miles i'm rolling on"
 
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Florianopolis
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Re: Way off the centerline on approach?

Sun Mar 05, 2017 4:47 pm

This is all over the internets. Sometimes you'll see S-turns for spacing, or sidesteps to parallel runways late on approach. This just looks like a non-precision approach that wasn't executed to perfection.

See the VOR brings you in slightly off the runway course, and you have to make a little left turn to line up with the runway. Maybe they saw vehicle lights that looked like runway rabbit lights, and missed the turn. Nobody is perfect.

Image


And now we understand why structures in the runway area are built to be frangible, and why glideslope antennas aren't just localizer antennas stuck up in the air, leaning back 2 degrees.
 
113312
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Re: Way off the centerline on approach?

Sun Mar 05, 2017 7:42 pm

When you watch the video, it's clear that they flew Final south of the correct course and instead of turning left to align with the runway, had to turn right. Did they use VOR raw data or use a FMS to navigate this approach? Clearly, there was an error in programming, execution or both. Fortunately, they executed a successful missed approach.
 
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SaveFerris
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Re: Way off the centerline on approach?

Sun Mar 05, 2017 9:38 pm

113312 wrote:
When you watch the video, it's clear that they flew Final south of the correct course and instead of turning left to align with the runway, had to turn right. Did they use VOR raw data or use a FMS to navigate this approach? Clearly, there was an error in programming, execution or both. Fortunately, they executed a successful missed approach.


Not sure about Aeromexico Connect's procedures but for what it's worth our procedures at my previous carrier, flying the same airplane, the pilot flying would be using the FMS to conduct the approach while the pilot monitoring would be using the VOR as a backup. This was because the approach is a VOR only, had it been listed as VOR or GPS both pilots would be using the FMS.
 
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Classa64
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Re: Way off the centerline on approach?

Mon Mar 06, 2017 6:37 pm

Thanks for the replies, sorry if was posted before.
I always thought it was always a straight in for most landings. Would you need special training for such airports or is this something pilots would know and practice for. They did a good job in getting back up after a missed and we do have bad days :)
C.
"Freedom is the miles i'm rolling on"
 
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zeke
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Re: Way off the centerline on approach?

Mon Mar 06, 2017 6:49 pm

Often the VOR or NDB were located next to the runway, they cannot be on the runway as you would hit it on takeoff or landing. It is the physical offset of the ground transmitter from the runway that results in a slightly offset final approach path, as the aircraft is tracking to the transmitter.

Some airports the transmitter location does not even permit an approach path like the one on the video, pilots need to "circle" I.e. Do a bad weather circuit to a landing.

These days with gps/rnav approaches it is becoming a thing of the past.
“Don't be a show-off. Never be too proud to turn back. There are old pilots and bold pilots, but no old, bold pilots.” E. Hamilton Lee, 1949
 
benbeny
Posts: 250
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Re: Way off the centerline on approach?

Tue Mar 07, 2017 1:37 pm

zeke wrote:
Often the VOR or NDB were located next to the runway, they cannot be on the runway as you would hit it on takeoff or landing. It is the physical offset of the ground transmitter from the runway that results in a slightly offset final approach path, as the aircraft is tracking to the transmitter.

Some airports the transmitter location does not even permit an approach path like the one on the video, pilots need to "circle" I.e. Do a bad weather circuit to a landing.

These days with gps/rnav approaches it is becoming a thing of the past.

Zeke, IIRC in here I still saw many VOR/NDB only procedure approach... I hope that will change soon, though

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