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Starlionblue
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:14 am

Heard an extended variant of "standing by" last night...

"Flight 123, radar identified. Stand by for higher level."
"Standing by for higher level, flight 123."


:hissyfit: :hissyfit: :hissyfit:

And then there's unnecessary readback of "expect" information from ATC:
"Flight 123, Coruscant Radar. Cleared the Skywalker 2 Bravo STAR. Expect Runway zero-five right."
"Cleared Skywalker 2 Bravo. Expecting Runway zero-five right."


I feel my grumpy old man coming on... :old:
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
flipdewaf
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Fri Jul 20, 2018 1:12 pm

I think I understand both sides here. As a bug smashing pilot who hasn't flown for a few years I would be a bit rusty on what I did and didn't have to read back and would rather be safe than sorry. Hearing the phrase "with you" however annoyed me as well too as it doesn't give the recipient of the information anything useful, its like asking "can everyone hear me?" or when my wife calls me and says "hi, it's me".

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Starlionblue
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Wed Aug 15, 2018 7:16 am

SAAFNAV wrote:
ChrisKen wrote:
SAAFNAV wrote:
Whoo, talking about pet peeves: A lot of pilots in my country has picked up the habit to call a station 'Tower, xxx on 118.35'.

A tower can have more than one frequency.
Also, controllers maybe working more than one frequency (esp true if a military airfield VHF/UHF) so it's handy to know which the station is calling on.
There are scenarios when you'll 'hand-off' to yourself. Pilot repeating the frequency after switching helps confirm it's been correctly done.


The American controller in the previous QNH nonsense was just being a grade A arse. Just give him the setting, he's asked using international standard phraseology, you know what he means, he knows what he means, everyone knows what he means.

The 'Altimeter' is an instrument not a setting. Altimeter settings come in different flavours (QNH,QFE,FL), by asking for QNH it should ensure he gets the setting and it's meaning. This is further backed up with the use of standard phraseology eg. "Altitude", "Height", "Level". The number on it's own is about as useless as the runway behind you or the fuel left on the ground.


Alright, I see your meaning, but then the tower will also have different sectors like West or East.

Maybe my example wasn't too great, but people also say that on unmanned frequencies as well. Listing the specific area (only one freq) AND the frequency being called on.

I agree totally with the rest.


The one time I say the partial frequency is when using HF. Reception is often spotty (understatement) so you might have to try 2-3 frequencies. The way I've heard it, the controller might have all the receivers on one console, and it may not be immediately clear which frequency you're calling on. So it'll be "Manila Radio, Flight 123 on eight-niner", indicating you're transmitting on 8942 and not, say, on 5655.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
KingOrGod
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Wed Aug 15, 2018 11:55 am

ELBOB wrote:
KingOrGod wrote:
It *is* redundant. I know exactly who I have on my frequency, and who I am expecting. Of course you are "with me" - you are on my frequency.


You won't always know who to expect when dealing with lots of VFR GA traffic. In that case I can understand their pilots using 'with you' as an indicator that they're entering your airspace.


Actually, that is incorrect, I will. I have radtags and/or discrete codes and/or pool codes for each and every aircraft under my control and has established communications with me. I *do* know who is new to me as I have situational awareness and radar tools to assist in that process. Even when I worked procedural, aka non-radar, I knew exactly who was on frequency because I had flight progress strips in front of me. No flight progress strip, means new to the frequency. If he was flight planned, I had a FPS and then would be checkmarked as "on freq" when he called in.

This is my job. I know who I am talking to and who I am not. I know what radar identification entails and I know the difference between unknown and unidentified traffic. Why is this hard to understand? There is no scenario I can understand, where a competent controller has no idea who's on his/her frequency.

If there is a controller who does not know who is on his frequency working traffic, I wish them only the very best of good luck. They will need it.

What I don't need is a "with you" phrase. It's unnecessary and pointless.

Same as "Checking in". See above for "with you".
Same as passing "4136 feet". I have only 100 foot differentiation, so 4100 is adequate. It's displayed as "041" on my screen. I don't care about the 36 feet.

** having re-read your initial statement: "You won't always know who to expect". Rule one of ATC, expect the unexpected. LOL. Seriously, read my reply above. It applies regardless of whether the aircraft is unknown, or just unidentified. We still know who's on our freq. Or should anyway.
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:06 pm

Wait.... People actually say things like "passing 4136 feet"?!? :shock:

Question for you: Apart from initial contact with departures, "Flight 123, Grumpy 2 departure, passing 2000 feet climbing 5000", do you even want the passing altitude from us? Like in radar control, if we get handed over while in a climb, do you care about anything more than "Flight 123, in climb flightlevel 330"?

Side note: One of our training captains hates it when you repeat the taxi instruction after handover on the ground, e.g. "Flight 123, on Alpha, right on Foxtrot, hold short Golf". In his view, they already know that you've received a hold short instruction and now you're just cluttering the frequency.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
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trpmb6
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Wed Aug 15, 2018 2:49 pm

Starlionblue wrote:

Side note: One of our training captains hates it when you repeat the taxi instruction after handover on the ground, e.g. "Flight 123, on Alpha, right on Foxtrot, hold short Golf". In his view, they already know that you've received a hold short instruction and now you're just cluttering the frequency.


I would think affirming a hold short would be quite important. Or have they already affirmed and then handover happened? Is that what you are saying?
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Wed Aug 15, 2018 2:53 pm

trpmb6 wrote:
Starlionblue wrote:

Side note: One of our training captains hates it when you repeat the taxi instruction after handover on the ground, e.g. "Flight 123, on Alpha, right on Foxtrot, hold short Golf". In his view, they already know that you've received a hold short instruction and now you're just cluttering the frequency.


I would think affirming a hold short would be quite important. Or have they already affirmed and then handover happened? Is that what you are saying?


Already affirmed, then handover happened.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
Woodreau
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:36 pm

I’m not a controller, but he does want the passing “2000” as well as your cleared altitude “5000”.

2000 so that he can verify his altitude readout on his display “20” and the 5000 so that he knows that you’re both on the same page.
I do understand over in Europe they can see more information from the extended mode S, like what altitude is set in the altitude selector, indicated airspeed, and indicated heading - stuff that isn’t used in the US.
Bonus animus sit, ab experientia. Quod salvatum fuerit de malis usu venit judicium.
 
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Moose135
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:43 pm

LH707330 wrote:
There does seem to be some non-standard terminology in use in the US, I've picked some of it up as I've learned and listened in on other chatter.

"Cessna 123 ident" followed by "Here's the flash, Cessna 123"


Pushing the Ident button is all the acknowledgement you need, you don't need to repeat the instruction back to the controller.
KC-135 - Passing gas and taking names!
 
ChrisKen
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Wed Aug 15, 2018 8:03 pm

Moose135 wrote:
Pushing the Ident button is all the acknowledgement you need, you don't need to repeat the instruction back to the controller.


It's a mandatory readback item in the UK as it's a SSR operating instruction.

While not specifically listed in other areas of the world a/c "Squawk Ident, abc123" & press the button, would also be the best response IAW good airmanship. Confirms the correct station has received the instruction.
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Thu Aug 16, 2018 2:36 am

Woodreau wrote:
I’m not a controller, but he does want the passing “2000” as well as your cleared altitude “5000”.

2000 so that he can verify his altitude readout on his display “20” and the 5000 so that he knows that you’re both on the same page.
I do understand over in Europe they can see more information from the extended mode S, like what altitude is set in the altitude selector, indicated airspeed, and indicated heading - stuff that isn’t used in the US.


That was my thought. However, as you say in Europe they can probably tell what I had for breakfast.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
saxdiva
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Mon Aug 20, 2018 4:31 am

Starlionblue wrote:
Heard an extended variant of "standing by" last night...

"Flight 123, radar identified. Stand by for higher level."
"Standing by for higher level, flight 123."


:hissyfit: :hissyfit: :hissyfit:


Bug-smasher here, but there’s one place I'll consistently use “standing by,” and that’s when I’m holding short of my departure runway, have called up the tower, and was asked to stand by:

“XXX Tower, Decathlon XXXXX holding short one-niner, right crosswind departure”

“Decathlon XXX, stand by for landing traffic.”

“Standing by, XXX”

In this case, I wasn’t given a hold short instruction so there’s no need to read one back. However, I want them to know I've a) heard them, and b) am not going anywhere—including on to the runway. I suppose I could communicate this with just the abbreviated call sign, but this seems to be a local practice.

“With you.” I know it’s non-standard phraseology, and I also notice it being used all the time on the approach frequencies here in the L.A. area—by commercial traffic. All I can do is try to be better.
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GalaxyFlyer
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Mon Aug 20, 2018 3:38 pm

Not moving is confirmation enough!

GF
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Thu Aug 23, 2018 6:12 am

saxdiva wrote:
Starlionblue wrote:
Heard an extended variant of "standing by" last night...

"Flight 123, radar identified. Stand by for higher level."
"Standing by for higher level, flight 123."


:hissyfit: :hissyfit: :hissyfit:


Bug-smasher here, but there’s one place I'll consistently use “standing by,” and that’s when I’m holding short of my departure runway, have called up the tower, and was asked to stand by:

“XXX Tower, Decathlon XXXXX holding short one-niner, right crosswind departure”

“Decathlon XXX, stand by for landing traffic.”

“Standing by, XXX”

In this case, I wasn’t given a hold short instruction so there’s no need to read one back. However, I want them to know I've a) heard them, and b) am not going anywhere—including on to the runway. I suppose I could communicate this with just the abbreviated call sign, but this seems to be a local practice.

“With you.” I know it’s non-standard phraseology, and I also notice it being used all the time on the approach frequencies here in the L.A. area—by commercial traffic. All I can do is try to be better.


I'd say your transmission is both useful and clear. However, if I had to nitpick, Tower's transmission is informational. As you say all you need to respond with is your callsign or "roger", to indicate that you heard them. Actually, I'm pretty sure you don't need to say anything, but that crosses the line from exactly correct RT into unhelpful territory. ;)

Local practice is great for local pilots, but if you're not from there you need to reasonably expect that standard phrases are acceptable.

"With you" is a very American thing, but as mentioned above even my US instructors were very much against it.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Thu Aug 23, 2018 6:20 am

GalaxyFlyer wrote:
Not moving is confirmation enough!

GF


Agreed, but I bet if no response was forthcoming, in this particular case ATC would call again. :D
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
BA777FO
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Sat Aug 25, 2018 1:32 am

GalaxyFlyer wrote:
Why is the QFE option baseline when only Russia presently uses it?


We fly our 777s to Moscow (sometimes, the 787 seems to be doing it at the moment). A lot of enroute Russian airfields use weird combinations of metres, inHg and QFE. Last thing you need at 3 o’clock in the morning in December into a snowy airfield in deepest darkest Russia! That said with QFE operation we do a QNH conversion, we don’t actually select QFE. Same with metres in Russia/China - we convert to feet and select that in the MCP.

As with the R/T, being based in London I like to stay as standard and short as possible. Glad the Americans have adopted line up and wait rather than position and hold! But with the altitude/level clearances and the use of the word “to” you climb/descend to an altitude and just climb/descend flight level. So it’d be descend to altitude 4,000ft, climb to altitude 5,000ft but climb flight level 230 or descend flight level 310. The word altitude should be used when cleared to an altitude, at least according to CAP413. From the CAP:

“All messages relating to an aircraft’s climb or descent to a HEIGHT ​or ALTITUDE employ the word ‘to’ followed immediately by the ​word HEIGHT or ALTITUDE. Furthermore, the initial message in any ​such RTF exchange will also include the appropriate QFE or QNH“

One thing I often find a touch frustrating with US ATC is that I’m often given a takeoff or landing clearance without being given a wind readout. It’s useful information to know the instantaneous wind readout. As for being cleared to land 20 miles out and number 4 on the approach...that’s weird!
 
aeropix
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Sat Aug 25, 2018 2:48 pm

I have to agree with the ATC folks on here, and after my 30 years of flying always prefer to keep the radio transmissions brief yet full of information. If you must fill up your opening transmission with extra verbiage, and therefore are prone to adding "with you" or "checking in" just state your altitude after your callsign. "Cessna 1234P Level Six Thousand" You will have satisfied your urge to use extra words while giving the ATC a valuable piece of information that he can use to validate your position and verify the accuracy of your altitude encoder, all with the similar radio time that "with you" would have used. It's a win-win for everybody.
 
KingOrGod
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Sat Sep 01, 2018 10:18 pm

Starlionblue wrote:
Wait.... People actually say things like "passing 4136 feet"?!? :shock:

Question for you: Apart from initial contact with departures, "Flight 123, Grumpy 2 departure, passing 2000 feet climbing 5000", do you even want the passing altitude from us? Like in radar control, if we get handed over while in a climb, do you care about anything more than "Flight 123, in climb flightlevel 330"?

Side note: One of our training captains hates it when you repeat the taxi instruction after handover on the ground, e.g. "Flight 123, on Alpha, right on Foxtrot, hold short Golf". In his view, they already know that you've received a hold short instruction and now you're just cluttering the frequency.



Sorry for delay :)

Yes, some crews report it like that. Some crews depart with transponder still turned off, i'd say 2 or 3 times a week i get a ghost departing.

It is a requirement that the Mode C is verified at least once. For me it is on departure so that what you write is correct. However, ditch the clearance of 5000feet. I have mode S selcted level displayed to me, and so can see what you have dialled in - and besides the SID clearance applies anyway. When crossing into another FIR the same rules apply, so I'd just report level passing and cleared level.

The taxiing instructions is an interesting question. I'd likely side with the training captain. You've received and read back a clearance. We do co-ordinate with each other in the cab, so I'd be informed of your taxi clearance when you call me.

Our surveillance technology is getting better in Europe what with enhanced Mode S etc. Some centres now have callsign highlighting when you transmit. There is an array of RDF stations installed, so when you transmit, your position is triangulated and your callsign highlighted on the screen. This gripe isn't aimed at you Starlionblue, as I have been reading your replies for some time and you don't strike me as the type, but rather for the others that think it's cool: PLEASE : no more mooing or farting on 121.5 please. We can identify you now :) :)
 
KingOrGod
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Sat Sep 01, 2018 10:28 pm

Starlionblue wrote:
Woodreau wrote:
I’m not a controller, but he does want the passing “2000” as well as your cleared altitude “5000”.

2000 so that he can verify his altitude readout on his display “20” and the 5000 so that he knows that you’re both on the same page.
I do understand over in Europe they can see more information from the extended mode S, like what altitude is set in the altitude selector, indicated airspeed, and indicated heading - stuff that isn’t used in the US.


That was my thought. However, as you say in Europe they can probably tell what I had for breakfast.


just to follow on here Starlionblue, catching up what's transpired during my absence...

We have ModeS enhanced which on my screen will be:

FMS Callsign, you'll get a moan from us, as we use your ModeS c/s and squawk 1000 to correlate your target to your flight plan, so if you put in AC123 instead of ACA123 it won't work for us. (just randomly picking air canada here - I don't know who you fly for)
HDG: Actual magnetic heading
IAS: Actual IAS
Mach: Actual Mach no.
Selected Level: MCP selected level
BVR: Your barometric vertical rate

The ModeS extended squitter actually transmits a tonne of info to us, even your bank angle and category of aircraft etc. But there is simply too much information for a radar centre, so we have chosen those 6 useful parameters we can selectively display. The met data is something I find interesting and useful, but no means to display it on my screen.
 
ChrisKen
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Sun Sep 02, 2018 12:42 am

KingOrGod wrote:
: no more mooing or farting on 121.5 please. We can identify you now :) :)

Yikes, D&D have been doing that for 60 years in the UK. What took so long?
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Sun Sep 02, 2018 3:37 am

KingOrGod wrote:

Our surveillance technology is getting better in Europe what with enhanced Mode S etc. Some centres now have callsign highlighting when you transmit. There is an array of RDF stations installed, so when you transmit, your position is triangulated and your callsign highlighted on the screen. This gripe isn't aimed at you Starlionblue, as I have been reading your replies for some time and you don't strike me as the type, but rather for the others that think it's cool: PLEASE : no more mooing or farting on 121.5 please. We can identify you now :) :)




Like this? ;) https://youtu.be/YoZE0nE60sk?t=193

"GUAAAARRRDDDDDDDD.......!!!"
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
KingOrGod
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Sun Sep 02, 2018 7:51 pm

ChrisKen wrote:
KingOrGod wrote:
: no more mooing or farting on 121.5 please. We can identify you now :) :)

Yikes, D&D have been doing that for 60 years in the UK. What took so long?

On a civvie radar screen, this is new. No idea who d&d is. Air defence obviously been able to do it for ages, but I’m not referencing them.
 
KingOrGod
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Sun Sep 02, 2018 7:55 pm

Starlionblue wrote:
KingOrGod wrote:

Our surveillance technology is getting better in Europe what with enhanced Mode S etc. Some centres now have callsign highlighting when you transmit. There is an array of RDF stations installed, so when you transmit, your position is triangulated and your callsign highlighted on the screen. This gripe isn't aimed at you Starlionblue, as I have been reading your replies for some time and you don't strike me as the type, but rather for the others that think it's cool: PLEASE : no more mooing or farting on 121.5 please. We can identify you now :) :)




Like this? ;) https://youtu.be/YoZE0nE60sk?t=193

"GUAAAARRRDDDDDDDD.......!!!"

Lol yeah exactly like that ,121.5 has been like that the last weeks for some reason hahaha
 
ChrisKen
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:58 pm

KingOrGod wrote:
ChrisKen wrote:
KingOrGod wrote:
: no more mooing or farting on 121.5 please. We can identify you now :) :)

Yikes, D&D have been doing that for 60 years in the UK. What took so long?

On a civvie radar screen, this is new. No idea who d&d is. Air defence obviously been able to do it for ages, but I’m not referencing them.

Distress & Diversion Cell(s), 121.5/243 in any part of U.K's airspace. Civil & military (to whom all those practice pans that non-UK commercial skygods moan about go to).
I'd suspect they take note of anyone taking the pish.

Maybe they've been restructured in the last few years...not kept tabs.
 
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Sun Sep 02, 2018 10:21 pm

trpmb6 wrote:
Starlionblue wrote:

Side note: One of our training captains hates it when you repeat the taxi instruction after handover on the ground, e.g. "Flight 123, on Alpha, right on Foxtrot, hold short Golf". In his view, they already know that you've received a hold short instruction and now you're just cluttering the frequency.


I would think affirming a hold short would be quite important. Or have they already affirmed and then handover happened? Is that what you are saying?

Don't many ATISs say "all aircraft read back hold short instructions"?
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KingOrGod
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Mon Sep 03, 2018 8:34 am

BWIAirport wrote:
trpmb6 wrote:
Starlionblue wrote:

Side note: One of our training captains hates it when you repeat the taxi instruction after handover on the ground, e.g. "Flight 123, on Alpha, right on Foxtrot, hold short Golf". In his view, they already know that you've received a hold short instruction and now you're just cluttering the frequency.


I would think affirming a hold short would be quite important. Or have they already affirmed and then handover happened? Is that what you are saying?

Don't many ATISs say "all aircraft read back hold short instructions"?


I think this captain is discussing the repeating of taxi and hold short instructions after a frequency change (eg from ground to tower). The instruction was already received and read back with (i assume) the ground controller. We sometimes tell them to change to the next frequency while on the taxi prior to the clearance limit. So I guess what he is asking is does one really need to jam the next frequency with an acknowledged clearance on first contact?
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Mon Sep 03, 2018 8:48 am

KingOrGod wrote:
BWIAirport wrote:
trpmb6 wrote:

I would think affirming a hold short would be quite important. Or have they already affirmed and then handover happened? Is that what you are saying?

Don't many ATISs say "all aircraft read back hold short instructions"?


I think this captain is discussing the repeating of taxi and hold short instructions after a frequency change (eg from ground to tower). The instruction was already received and read back with (i assume) the ground controller. We sometimes tell them to change to the next frequency while on the taxi prior to the clearance limit. So I guess what he is asking is does one really need to jam the next frequency with an acknowledged clearance on first contact?


Exactly like that. You've already acknowledged something like "taxi juliet, left on tango, hold short x-ray". You're now handed over to the next frequency (tower or other ground). Callsign should be enough as the new controller should know your clearance limit. I can understand how extra clarity is good, but at busy airports keeping it short is also good. Happy to hear dissenting opinions. :)

Similarly in the cruise. We don't need to tell the next controller if we have an offset from the airway. He already knows. On the other hand, if you're being vectored and the handover specifically contains information instructions, e.g. "Change to London Control, 123.7, with your heading", obviously initial contact will be "London, Flight 123, 18000 feet, heading one-two-zero."
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
KingOrGod
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Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Tue Sep 04, 2018 6:41 am

Starlionblue wrote:
KingOrGod wrote:
BWIAirport wrote:
Don't many ATISs say "all aircraft read back hold short instructions"?


I think this captain is discussing the repeating of taxi and hold short instructions after a frequency change (eg from ground to tower). The instruction was already received and read back with (i assume) the ground controller. We sometimes tell them to change to the next frequency while on the taxi prior to the clearance limit. So I guess what he is asking is does one really need to jam the next frequency with an acknowledged clearance on first contact?


Exactly like that. You've already acknowledged something like "taxi juliet, left on tango, hold short x-ray". You're now handed over to the next frequency (tower or other ground). Callsign should be enough as the new controller should know your clearance limit. I can understand how extra clarity is good, but at busy airports keeping it short is also good. Happy to hear dissenting opinions. :)

Similarly in the cruise. We don't need to tell the next controller if we have an offset from the airway. He already knows. On the other hand, if you're being vectored and the handover specifically contains information instructions, e.g. "Change to London Control, 123.7, with your heading", obviously initial contact will be "London, Flight 123, 18000 feet, heading one-two-zero."


I think I would have agree with the Training Captain you quote. Having been a ground and tower controller, I am happy that enough co-ordination takes place between TWR and GND rendering a second readback of the clearance unnecessary.

Obviously when you're advised to report something to the next controller it is good. However that's largely reduced over the years as technology has (very slowly) made its way into the ATC world. Often assigned headings, speeds and or rates are handed off to the next sector, and with ModeS we can see compliance straight away without having to waste R/T time. I do have collegues that refuse to believe/use mode S data and still ask headings etc. It's just a generation gap I guess.

Mileage may vary however, as there is no standardisation of display data and data exchange etc. So in a well equipped centre there may be a totally stripless system where all control functions take place on the screen, then some less stellar equipped centres with strips etc. These systems are not cheap and there is often a resistance to change to bring in revolutionary change instead of an incremental change. Sigh.
 
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AirKevin
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Joined: Wed Apr 26, 2017 2:18 am

Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:55 pm

Difference? If you just respond with "Roger", this happens.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttlY2gRJsL8&t=0m17s
Captain Kevin
 
KingOrGod
Posts: 192
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 3:19 pm

Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:32 am

AirKevin wrote:
Difference? If you just respond with "Roger", this happens.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttlY2gRJsL8&t=0m17s


Those guys are ATC's I'd never aspire to be like. :tapedshut:
 
User avatar
ojjunior
Posts: 1041
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2006 12:31 am

Re: Difference between saying "Roger" and your callsign?

Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:49 pm

Sorry, couldn't resist: https://youtu.be/2OBZf0QdKdE

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