mcg
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Posts: 965
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2003 11:49 am

EMB-145 Take Off

Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:38 pm

I took a trip recently DEN-GPI and return on UAX. The equipment both ways was EMB-145. On both take offs the pilots seemed to taxi the airplane on to the runway, set the brakes, then power up the engine to take off power. The only other times I've experienced this procedure was when taking off from short runways, but neither of these take offs were on particularly short runways (in fact the runway in Denver was 16,000 feet long). Any idea why this procedure was used? Thanks in advance for any info.
 
timh4000
Posts: 150
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:14 pm

Re: EMB-145 Take Off

Mon Jan 07, 2019 6:42 pm

I've taken several flights on the 145. I have not had them do this on every flight but I've had a cpl of flights that did. ALB has 8000ft runways which should be plenty for it, and PHL, not sure what there shortest is, but obviously there are runways longer than 8000ft.
 
Woodreau
Posts: 1776
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2001 6:44 am

Re: EMB-145 Take Off

Mon Jan 07, 2019 10:00 pm

Whenever the aircraft is near a runway limit (short runway) or climb limit (obstacle clearance) a static takeoff is used. In Denver the limit is usually not the runway, but an obstacle limit due to climb performance.
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mcg
Topic Author
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Re: EMB-145 Take Off

Mon Jan 07, 2019 10:17 pm

Thanks, but what was interesting was the runway was 34L, which in 16,000 feet long with no apparent obstacles.
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: EMB-145 Take Off

Tue Jan 08, 2019 12:02 am

Was it cold? The pilots might have performed a fan ice shedding procedure. This would involve increasing to a certain thrust setting (e.g. 50% N1) for a certain time (e.g. 10 seconds), then releasing brakes and setting take-off-thrust.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
ChrisKen
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Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 11:15 pm

Re: EMB-145 Take Off

Tue Jan 08, 2019 12:28 am

Missing the obvious.....Did they have a take-off clearance on entering the runway or were they just lining up?
 
KAUSpilot
Posts: 1684
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2002 2:15 pm

Re: EMB-145 Take Off

Tue Jan 08, 2019 12:59 am

EMB-145 used to require an "ice test" on the first flight of the day, which involved an engine runup, then opening the wing, stabilizer, and engine anti-ice valves briefly to make sure the ice protection system worked, iirc. It has been almost 10 years since I flew the jet so I'm not sure if they still do that. We usually did it prior to taking the runway because it was on the "taxi checklist" but every airline is different, and things may have changed over time, so it could be something more close to what starlionblue referenced now.
 
Woodreau
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Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2001 6:44 am

Re: EMB-145 Take Off

Tue Jan 08, 2019 4:16 am

[twoid][/twoid]
mcg wrote:
Thanks, but what was interesting was the runway was 34L, which in 16,000 feet long with no apparent obstacles.

Runway length has nothing to do with it. Second segment climb is limiting even on 34L.
Bonus animus sit, ab experientia. Quod salvatum fuerit de malis usu venit judicium.
 
AA737-823
Posts: 5435
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2000 11:10 am

Re: EMB-145 Take Off

Fri Jan 11, 2019 2:08 am

One thing that might play a factor is the inherent design characteristics of the ERJ series.
It's a high V-speed aircraft, which is compounded by Denver's hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigh elevation.
And while there's lots of runway available, runway length is not the only factor that figures in to takeoff performance needs.
Single-engine performance when you're trying to climb out, having already started at over 5,000 feet, can be a big issue.
They feel the... NEED FOR SPEED!!!!
 
flapsdown40
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Aug 25, 2016 11:41 am

Re: EMB-145 Take Off

Fri Jan 11, 2019 1:59 pm

Starlionblue wrote:
Was it cold? The pilots might have performed a fan ice shedding procedure. This would involve increasing to a certain thrust setting (e.g. 50% N1) for a certain time (e.g. 10 seconds), then releasing brakes and setting take-off-thrust.


This reminds me of the time I watched an AA MD-80 do something like that years ago on a cold morning with icy rain mixed with very light snow. But the engines seemed to have been throttled up way past 50% N1; more like 70 - 75% for 30 seconds or so before brake release. And when the brakes were released, that plane *moved* down the runway! It kinda reminded me of watching F18's takeoff from Miramar. (The MD80 incident wasn't in San Diego, btw.)
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