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Topic Author
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What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 6:36 am

A Flight in the Life of A Cockpit Crew on A Long Haul Flight

It seems fairly easy to understand the basic cockpit activities on most flights — taxiing to runway, takeoff, check-ins with various ATC, navigating busy air traffic corridors, monitoring aircraft systems, analyzing weather events, landing and taxiing to gate.

It’s obvious that during short haul flights the cockpit is very busy.

But what is it like on long haul flights, e.g., LAX-SYD or PER-LHR? For example: Are there slow times? If so what does the cockpit crew do? What can they not do? Do night flights seem different than daylight flights, e.g., boredom? Typically how many hours is the crew on duty before being relieved?
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 6:55 am

move to Tech?
What we normally do is load a foreign language learning program into EICAS or ECAM. The default second language in EICAS is Chinese, and the default second language in ECAM is French. The primary language in ECAM is also French, although German available on special order. There are dialogs so the pilots can learn together. The PF asks the questions, and PM answers.
/humour
 
CATIIIevery5yrs
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 7:07 am

WPvsMW wrote:
move to Tech?
What we normally do is load a foreign language learning program into EICAS or ECAM. The default second language in EICAS is Chinese, and the default second language in ECAM is French. The primary language in ECAM is also French, although German available on special order. There are dialogs so the pilots can learn together. The PF asks the questions, and PM answers.
/humour


And then you take turns studying the overhead panel.
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 7:14 am

And sometimes close your eyes to make sure your memory of switch positions is accurate, but only after inviting cabin crew to j/s and make sure you don't peek.
 
Max Q
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 9:05 am

Are there slow times ?


Er, yes, watch the store, read, try to stay awake, avoid discussing politics or religion (unless you all agree) that’s about it


Not the most exciting but boring is
a good thing
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.


GGg
 
airbazar
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:52 am

All of these long haul flights have at least double crews so half the time is spent sleeping :)
 
SteelChair
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 5:59 pm

Most of the time they do nothing.

IMHO the cockpit manning formula will change in the future. EK already flew many long sectors last summer with 3 pilots instead of 4.
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 6:29 pm

SteelChair wrote:
IMHO the cockpit manning formula will change in the future. EK already flew many long sectors last summer with 3 pilots instead of 4.


EK did that to reduce pilot fatigue, right? And ALPA, DALPA, etc., are begging the operators for smaller relief crews (corollary is fewer pilots)....
/sarcasm (directed at EK)
 
stratclub
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 6:36 pm

IDK. Fly the airplane maybe? After all flying the airplane is sometime passively monitoring the automation. Pretty tough job...........
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 6:56 pm

But whoever is flying long haul on a WB paid their dues to get there.
 
CosmicCruiser
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 9:29 pm

stratclub wrote:
IDK. Fly the airplane maybe? After all flying the airplane is sometime passively monitoring the automation. Pretty tough job...........

not in RVSM airspace
 
GalaxyFlyer
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 10:23 pm

SteelChair wrote:
Most of the time they do nothing.

IMHO the cockpit manning formula will change in the future. EK already flew many long sectors last summer with 3 pilots instead of 4.


Overwater-CNS to PPT, yeah pretty quiet. HKG-SVO at night, real hard stay awake. DUB-DXB or DXB-PEK can be fairly busy, depending on time of day. KSAV-HCMM with 4 ARs was budy the whole way.

GF
Last edited by GalaxyFlyer on Thu Feb 28, 2019 10:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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N62NA
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 10:25 pm

Too bad nobody has provided a serious answer. Maybe the adults will show up soon.

This is a legitimate topic.
 
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BWIAirport
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 10:32 pm

N62NA wrote:
Too bad nobody has provided a serious answer. Maybe the adults will show up soon.

This is a legitimate topic.

Thank you. I appreciate humor as much as the next guy, but there's a legitimate question on the table.

I am not a pilot, but from my understanding, there is a lot of monitoring that goes on during a flight. Fuel calculations are often done periodically to ensure the aircraft will always have enough fuel to fly the remainder of the trip. They are monitoring weather and planning deviations as necessary. Of course, most of the "fun" happens pre-flight, takeoff, and landing, but there's work to be done in the meantime.
SWA, UAL, DAL, AWE, ASA, TRS, DLH, CLH, AFR, BAW, EIN, AAL, FFT | E190 DC94 CRJ2 B712 B733 B737 B738 B38M B739 B744 B752 B753 B762 B77W A319 A320 A20N A321 A333 A343 A388 MD88
 
BravoOne
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 10:36 pm

Well for starters,
Monitor flight plan vs actual performance,
Monitor aircraft flight performance,
Maintain proper communications-ATC, Company,
Do your very best to stay awake.
Get ready for the good layover.

Maybe not in that order, but close.
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:11 pm

Good summary, B1, now we can get back to humour. There's plenty of time for supernumeraries on cargo flights to play pranks on each other, like shortsheeting the beds in the "sleeper" LD3 can, or putting decaf in the espresso machine.

The point is... there is a dearth of distractions, the worst flight are ones without conversation, and the never-ending internal debate about whether to have another cup of "coffee", in quotes because the ground coffee is lowest bid and the water is .... tap water in an very old aluminum tank. Cargo operators could distinguish their recruitment offers with specialty coffee, espresso machines (SR had real espresso machines), and inflatable mattresses (with seat belts, of course).
Last edited by WPvsMW on Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
mikeinatlanta
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:20 pm

There I was. AWACS Crew Chief. Our spot in flight was in the back by the galley. First the Pilot shows up and starts eating. Then the Copilot shows up and hits the head. We were doing a 12 hour stint of orbits, but I'm wondering who is flying the plane. I head up front and find the Nav asleep and the Engineer reading a book. Strapped into the captains seat is a no shit teddy bear. This really happened. 1985.
Aircraft Maintenance Professional since 1979.
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:23 pm

No problem. The engineer was awake and monitoring the teddy bear.

@mikeinatlanta... that was a prank by the pilots for your benefit.
 
stratclub
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Fri Mar 01, 2019 12:07 am

N62NA wrote:
Too bad nobody has provided a serious answer. Maybe the adults will show up soon.

This is a legitimate topic.

IDK what you expect. Basically, they fly the aircraft which means they are an on site human presence that monitors the automation which could include route and altitude selection, reacting to unplanned emergencies and ensuring they always have enough fuel to reach their destination.

Flying. Hours and hours of mind numbing boredom surrounded by moments of shear terror. Hopefully, the terror part never happens, but you still have to plan for it just in case it does happens.
 
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zeke
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Fri Mar 01, 2019 12:44 am

questions wrote:
But what is it like on long haul flights, e.g., LAX-SYD or PER-LHR? For example: Are there slow times? If so what does the cockpit crew do? What can they not do? Do night flights seem different than daylight flights, e.g., boredom? Typically how many hours is the crew on duty before being relieved?


The workload is pretty constant in the cruise. Always need to monitor the aircraft, the flight path, and communications.

Need to continually update the best alternate airports which includes getting current conditions, decoding things like snowtams, runway state codes, making cold weather corrections, doing landing performance assessments. Review the notams and charts in detail for factors that will impact a landing if a diversion is required.

A lot of work goes into preparing for diversions which thankfully don’t eventuate.

Try and manage the crew rest arrangements to minimise low alertness levels.
“Don't be a show-off. Never be too proud to turn back. There are old pilots and bold pilots, but no old, bold pilots.” E. Hamilton Lee, 1949
 
747Whale
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Fri Mar 01, 2019 12:48 am

A flight is made up of a series of waypoints, or locations in space through which the aircraft will pass. These are determined in advance as part of the flight plan, and entered into the navigation computer or system. Both crewmembers, or in the case of larger crews, each crew member, will check this information using various means (name, bearing, distance, lat/long, reasonableness on map plan, etc).

Each waypoint also comes with other parameters such as fuel burn and time between waypoints. After takeoff, the time of takeoff is entered at the start of the flight plan, and the flight plan is "scored" with a time calculated for every waypoint passage; this takes ten minutes or so. During the flight, as each waypoint is passed, or as every few waypoints are passed (depending on spacing), the crewmember not flying will note the time over the waypoint and write it on the flight plan next to the calculated time, to keep tabs on changing ETA's over waypoints; this becomes important in the event of degraded navigation capability, and as winds change, so will the actual arrival over waypoints, as will changes in routing that occur during the flight (eg, given a direct-to fix, skipping several fixes). Any changes are recorded on the flight plan.

Over each waypoint, calculated fuel is compared to actual fuel to detect changes in trends, indications, leaks, etc, and to create a written record of fuel trends.

At the same time, communications may be as simple as responding to air traffic control, or may be position reports noting time and altitude over a fix, estimated time to the next fix, and name of subsequent fix. Crossing many flight information regions requires advance notice; typically 10 minutes from a border, a second radio will be used to call ahead to the next sector prior to arrival, to coordinate passage.

Aircraft systems are monitored throughout the flight and adjusted. Fuel may need to be moved or circulated for temperature, especially as the flight goes on; flight altitudes are typically below the gel or freeze point of the fuel, and as fuel burns off, the fuel cools more quickly, and fuel in thin tanks such as wingtip tanks or tail tanks cools much faster; this may need attention, as well as fuel transfers, balancing, etc. All other systems also need monitoring, or checking; a known hydraulic loss, for example, or oil burn, might require close attention.

On some long routes, re-clearances are used at a mid point to enable the long flight with less reserve; adequate reserve is carried to the midpoint, recalculated approaching the midpoint, and the operator will then issue a re-clearance is sufficient reserve remains for the second portion. Likewise, equal-time points are monitored and calculated or recalculated for diversions in the event of onboard mechanical emergencies, depressurization, or medical emergency (ETP, range and choice of diversion means that typically at least three ETP's are calculated based on the nature of the problem and whether flight at al lower altitude is required.

Weather updates and monitoring is conducted enroute. Coordination with the operator may occur regarding medical issues, as well as operational issues (changes in the flight which might cause a delay, such as holding, slot times, etc.

Nav accuracy will be checked against ground based radio stations, and against other nav units on board.

I usually keep track of notable locations outside the aircraft and reference them for my own edification, such as passing the site of the Titanic, etc.

My aeronautical charts are now contained on an ipad, which also contains a large complement of study materials, company manuals, etc; time will be spent referencing minimum equipment lists, deice procedures, and airport and approach/arrival diagrams for the destination.

Each flight plan contains wind forecasts at a variety of altitudes for most of the main waypoints across the route; these will be entered into the computer or flight management system to make planning more accurate, and will be adjusted real time by the computer based on current winds, as the waypoints are passed.

I've had a number of flights, especially if one of the crew is preparing for a recurrent training or checkride, in which crew will quiz each other on systems, procedures, etc. Life stories, been-there, done-that tales, embarrassing anecdotes, and pictures of kids get shared. I know one captain who used to revel in writing his own soduku puzzles.

The NOTAM pages are often 30-40 pages thick on the flight plan, containing a lot of extraneous information; usually prior to the flight only the relevant information, airports, etc, is checked, but enroute I go through the entire packet and highlight anything that could be meaningful, even in a diversion.

That's a little bit of what's done in the cockpit during transit. I don't find that boredom is really an issue.

I typically hand fly the takeoff, departure, and climb until arrival in RVSM (reduced vertical separation) airspace, engaging the autopilot between 27,000 and 29,000', and I usually hand fly on the way down, whether just the approach or more, alternating between automated and manually flown to maintain proficiency, which also keeps us busier. When handflying, all changes are commanded, so the pilot flying will command heading changes and altitude changes by the pilot not flying, who will set them in the alerter or heading functions of the glareshield panel, and all such changes require confirmation of both pilots, as well as verbal announcement of any flight mode annunciator changes, approaching or leaving altitudes, etc. Any changes to the routing are confirmed by both. Enroute I'll typically monitor weather reports of stations along the route, which may be useful in the event of a diversion.

I've had other nights when I spent quite a bit of time looking out the window; on a trip a few months ago over northern Canada, I saw one of the most spectacular displays of the aurora that I've ever seen, and it lasted for about three hours. We turned the cockpit lighting low and spent most of that three hours enjoying the view, when we weren't attending cockpit duties. The cockpit has the best view of any office in the world.

It would be a bit of an exaggeration to suggest that crew simply sit and wait for the destination to arrive.
 
CosmicCruiser
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Fri Mar 01, 2019 1:08 am

well said and I can identify with most of your experiences. We saw the aurorae with Halley's comet in it on one N.A. flight. On another a crewmember was talking about a satellite that flashed like a strobe. We all teased him with oh yeah I've seen it sure, it's alien. Then in the next 5 minutes we see this object going south to north moving fast. It flashed about 5 times across the sky and was gone! Always something to do. I got introduced to Sudoku too.
 
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N62NA
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Fri Mar 01, 2019 1:25 am

747Whale wrote:
A flight is made up of a series of waypoints, or locations in space through which the aircraft will pass. These are determined in advance as part of the flight plan, and entered into the navigation computer or system. Both crewmembers, or in the case of larger crews, each crew member, will check this information using various means (name, bearing, distance, lat/long, reasonableness on map plan, etc).

Each waypoint also comes with other parameters such as fuel burn and time between waypoints. After takeoff, the time of takeoff is entered at the start of the flight plan, and the flight plan is "scored" with a time calculated for every waypoint passage; this takes ten minutes or so. During the flight, as each waypoint is passed, or as every few waypoints are passed (depending on spacing), the crewmember not flying will note the time over the waypoint and write it on the flight plan next to the calculated time, to keep tabs on changing ETA's over waypoints; this becomes important in the event of degraded navigation capability, and as winds change, so will the actual arrival over waypoints, as will changes in routing that occur during the flight (eg, given a direct-to fix, skipping several fixes). Any changes are recorded on the flight plan.

Over each waypoint, calculated fuel is compared to actual fuel to detect changes in trends, indications, leaks, etc, and to create a written record of fuel trends.

At the same time, communications may be as simple as responding to air traffic control, or may be position reports noting time and altitude over a fix, estimated time to the next fix, and name of subsequent fix. Crossing many flight information regions requires advance notice; typically 10 minutes from a border, a second radio will be used to call ahead to the next sector prior to arrival, to coordinate passage.

Aircraft systems are monitored throughout the flight and adjusted. Fuel may need to be moved or circulated for temperature, especially as the flight goes on; flight altitudes are typically below the gel or freeze point of the fuel, and as fuel burns off, the fuel cools more quickly, and fuel in thin tanks such as wingtip tanks or tail tanks cools much faster; this may need attention, as well as fuel transfers, balancing, etc. All other systems also need monitoring, or checking; a known hydraulic loss, for example, or oil burn, might require close attention.

On some long routes, re-clearances are used at a mid point to enable the long flight with less reserve; adequate reserve is carried to the midpoint, recalculated approaching the midpoint, and the operator will then issue a re-clearance is sufficient reserve remains for the second portion. Likewise, equal-time points are monitored and calculated or recalculated for diversions in the event of onboard mechanical emergencies, depressurization, or medical emergency (ETP, range and choice of diversion means that typically at least three ETP's are calculated based on the nature of the problem and whether flight at al lower altitude is required.

Weather updates and monitoring is conducted enroute. Coordination with the operator may occur regarding medical issues, as well as operational issues (changes in the flight which might cause a delay, such as holding, slot times, etc.

Nav accuracy will be checked against ground based radio stations, and against other nav units on board.

I usually keep track of notable locations outside the aircraft and reference them for my own edification, such as passing the site of the Titanic, etc.

My aeronautical charts are now contained on an ipad, which also contains a large complement of study materials, company manuals, etc; time will be spent referencing minimum equipment lists, deice procedures, and airport and approach/arrival diagrams for the destination.

Each flight plan contains wind forecasts at a variety of altitudes for most of the main waypoints across the route; these will be entered into the computer or flight management system to make planning more accurate, and will be adjusted real time by the computer based on current winds, as the waypoints are passed.

I've had a number of flights, especially if one of the crew is preparing for a recurrent training or checkride, in which crew will quiz each other on systems, procedures, etc. Life stories, been-there, done-that tales, embarrassing anecdotes, and pictures of kids get shared. I know one captain who used to revel in writing his own soduku puzzles.

The NOTAM pages are often 30-40 pages thick on the flight plan, containing a lot of extraneous information; usually prior to the flight only the relevant information, airports, etc, is checked, but enroute I go through the entire packet and highlight anything that could be meaningful, even in a diversion.

That's a little bit of what's done in the cockpit during transit. I don't find that boredom is really an issue.

I typically hand fly the takeoff, departure, and climb until arrival in RVSM (reduced vertical separation) airspace, engaging the autopilot between 27,000 and 29,000', and I usually hand fly on the way down, whether just the approach or more, alternating between automated and manually flown to maintain proficiency, which also keeps us busier. When handflying, all changes are commanded, so the pilot flying will command heading changes and altitude changes by the pilot not flying, who will set them in the alerter or heading functions of the glareshield panel, and all such changes require confirmation of both pilots, as well as verbal announcement of any flight mode annunciator changes, approaching or leaving altitudes, etc. Any changes to the routing are confirmed by both. Enroute I'll typically monitor weather reports of stations along the route, which may be useful in the event of a diversion.

I've had other nights when I spent quite a bit of time looking out the window; on a trip a few months ago over northern Canada, I saw one of the most spectacular displays of the aurora that I've ever seen, and it lasted for about three hours. We turned the cockpit lighting low and spent most of that three hours enjoying the view, when we weren't attending cockpit duties. The cockpit has the best view of any office in the world.

It would be a bit of an exaggeration to suggest that crew simply sit and wait for the destination to arrive.



What a great write-up, thanks so much for taking the time to write and post this. I hope the OP isn't disheartened reading the first batch of snarky posts and will read yours. Again, thanks for taking the question seriously.
 
747Whale
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Fri Mar 01, 2019 6:06 am

It may help to understand that while what goes on in the cockpit might be fascinating to those outside the cockpit, but I think most crew will respond like most have in the thread. We do take doing the job seriously, but a description of cockpit activity on a long flight is like showing someone your home movies or pulling out pictures of the kids, except that most of us don't really believe anyone wants to see the movies or the kids. Most of what goes on is the mundane business of operating the flight, a lot of administrative paper shuffling, checking, much of it without a second thought because it's just part of the job. A little like turning to the guy at the next table at the fast food joint and saying, "hey, wanna see what's in my sandwich?"
 
Woodreau
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Fri Mar 01, 2019 10:39 am

There is time on short haul flights to become bored too. About the only flights where you stay busy all the time are flights less than an hour in duration. By the time you transition from climb to cruise, it’s time to set up for approach and landing.

Once the flight gets to over an hour, there’s down time in between all the tasks that have to be done. if you get along with the other crewmember, then “time flies when you’re having fun.” But there’s also times when you don’t have much to talk about.
Bonus animus sit, ab experientia. Quod salvatum fuerit de malis usu venit judicium.
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Fri Mar 01, 2019 7:18 pm

Woodreau wrote:
About the only flights where you stay busy all the time are flights less than an hour in duration.


One of the reasons few pilots ever leave HA unless they "moved up" to HA's WBs, then, with judgment clouded by chronic fatigue syndrome, they accept an offer from a major airline. /humour
 
Max Q
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sat Mar 02, 2019 8:22 am

WPvsMW wrote:
Woodreau wrote:
About the only flights where you stay busy all the time are flights less than an hour in duration.


One of the reasons few pilots ever leave HA unless they "moved up" to HA's WBs, then, with judgment clouded by chronic fatigue syndrome, they accept an offer from a major airline. /humour




Off topic for a moment, what does ‘WPvsMW’ mean ?
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.


GGg
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sat Mar 02, 2019 8:47 am

IATA codes. WP was Island Air, before dissolution. MW still is Mokulele. The point being that WP [IMO] should have shared the same market segment, as opposed to WP's strategy of competing against HA interisland. IOW, props vs. props makes more sense than Q400 vs. B712. Guess what the outcome was.... oh wait, "dissolution" gives it away.
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 03, 2019 12:36 am

And, I immodestly add, management at WP ignored my (unpaid and unsolicited, but offered) advice to use the Qs for an HNL/OGG shuttle, and forget about KOA and LIH, much less ITO (announced just before dissolution). The Q's CASM is lower than that of a B712, a minute or so difference in flight time HNL/OGG, WP could have had great LFs, and I doubt HA would have started a fare war for one city-pair. /soapbox
 
Max Q
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 03, 2019 8:11 am

WPvsMW wrote:
IATA codes. WP was Island Air, before dissolution. MW still is Mokulele. The point being that WP [IMO] should have shared the same market segment, as opposed to WP's strategy of competing against HA interisland. IOW, props vs. props makes more sense than Q400 vs. B712. Guess what the outcome was.... oh wait, "dissolution" gives it away.




Thanks for that, interesting and a very
unique user name
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.


GGg
 
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flyingturtle
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 03, 2019 10:35 am

I remember an old thread. Some pilots taught each other a language, other they began drawing. Others change into more comfortable clothing.
Reading accident reports is what calms me down
 
747Whale
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 03, 2019 5:10 pm

Given a long enough flight, sometimes we can knock out an entire Shakespearean play, or at least the first few acts. You can tell, if the captain disembarks dressed like Caesar.

You can tell the flight went badly if he's still wearing the knife.

Sometimes we resort to making ATC calls in iambic pentameter. Good fun.
 
stratclub
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 03, 2019 6:45 pm

Yup, an idle mind is a dangerous thing. :biggrin:
 
aeropix
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 03, 2019 6:54 pm

I think the answer lies somewhere in between the highly technical comments and the over-the-top shakespeare play or language learning comments.

In reality we spend about 25-50% of the time checking weather and planning diversions etc. and 50% or more of the time chatting, eating, stretching our legs (good circulatory health must not be overlooked) or reading. And yes, at most airlines on the earth (ie. outside of the US) we are often taking :45 minute company approved and regulatory sanctioned naps, yes even with augmenting crew on board.

I felt compelled to chime in and give a more balanced perspective since most replies, like our modern day politics, were either far-right or far-left on this discussion.
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 03, 2019 8:20 pm

stratclub wrote:
Yup, an idle mind is a dangerous thing. :biggrin:


I can't decide whether language learning on EICAS/ECAM, and iambic pentameter with Steve at JFK Ground, is far-right or far-left. :lol:
 
747Whale
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 03, 2019 10:32 pm

WPvsMW wrote:
I can't decide whether language learning on EICAS/ECAM, and iambic pentameter with Steve at JFK Ground, is far-right or far-left. :lol:


Well, now that really depends on whether it's a tragedy or a comedy, and in turn the issue of tragedy is largely a matter of empathy. Let's face it, Yorick, though dead, was still a court jester.

Let's not even get into the discussions cut short by the end of a meager 8 hour leg, when debating the merits of Marlowe wrote Shakespeare. The man was nefarious.

Now is the moment to begin our descent,
What TAF afoot yon distant field blow?
That one time we brief our imminent ILS
And fly that SADDE arrival number four.
 
WPvsMW
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 03, 2019 11:37 pm

Wow! Literati on the flight deck. Composing Sudoku pales in comparison.
 
WPvsMW
Posts: 2252
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2017 7:30 pm

Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 03, 2019 11:38 pm

double post.
 
747Whale
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Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:41 pm

Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Mon Mar 04, 2019 12:35 am

That might have been haiku. Really not sure.

I was never good with numbers, and consequently literature that requires a count.

If I could do that other stuff, I wouldn't be stuck flying rubber dog pucks out of the orient and bananas central africa. Or was in bananas in the orient?

Alzheimers sucks but good news is it's a pair of new socks every day. No matter what the day. Or the socks.
 
WPvsMW
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Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2017 7:30 pm

Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Mon Mar 04, 2019 4:46 am

And you get to laugh at the same joke... every day.

(BTW, not haiku. Haiku poems are 3 lines, with 5, 7, and 5 syllables/line, respectively. No rhyme or foot required.)
 
747Whale
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Mon Mar 04, 2019 5:11 am

That's quite a relief. I already need to remove one shoe and sock to do the descent math. My other foot would be too cold if I had to calculate stanzas, verses, and Japanese poetry. God forbid we break out a sonnet.
 
garf25
Posts: 32
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Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Fri Mar 08, 2019 8:11 pm

I recall a short haul pilot leaving my airline as he was sick of reading books.
Come on guys.....
 
747Whale
Posts: 725
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:41 pm

Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sat Mar 09, 2019 12:25 am

garf25 wrote:
I recall a short haul pilot leaving my airline as he was sick of reading books.
Come on guys.....


I've managed to write entire chapters on some trips.

Usually not from the pilot seat, though.
 
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exFWAOONW
Posts: 748
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 10:32 pm

Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 10, 2019 7:20 pm

747Whale wrote:
Given a long enough flight, sometimes we can knock out an entire Shakespearean play, or at least the first few acts. You can tell, if the captain disembarks dressed like Caesar.

You can tell the flight went badly if he's still wearing the knife.

Sometimes we resort to making ATC calls in iambic pentameter. Good fun.

Doesn’t Caesar die in Act I? (Granted, it’s been thirty some years since my last Brit Lit class :tombstone: )
Is just me, or is flying not as much fun anymore?
 
747Whale
Posts: 725
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:41 pm

Re: What Do Cockpit Crew Do on Long Haul Flights?

Sun Mar 10, 2019 9:15 pm

It's interpretive. Caesar didn't go quietly. Much like many captains.

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