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Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Sat Aug 24, 2019 2:57 pm
by DmelloMarfi
It seems to happen at some airports or some airlines, sometimes within the same airport some flights they rip off a portion of your pass and others they just scan it. Sometimes within the same airline at some airports they rip off the portion and sometimes don't. Is it just the gate agent discretion? What's the use of keeping the other portion of the boarding pass at the gate?

Re: Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Sat Aug 24, 2019 8:33 pm
by BasilFawlty
They become useful when the number of boarded passengers according to the system don’t match with the actual number of passengers on board, so in that case you can count all boarding passes.

Re: Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Sat Aug 24, 2019 9:17 pm
by TSS
BasilFawlty wrote:
They become useful when the number of boarded passengers according to the system don’t match with the actual number of passengers on board, so in that case you can count all boarding passes.


Interesting. I'd have thought it was more from habit than anything else.

Re: Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Sat Aug 24, 2019 11:31 pm
by BasilFawlty
No, I’ve worked as a gate agent and it’s solely for counting purposes, as soon as the flight is gone everything goes in the bin. :biggrin:

Re: Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Sun Aug 25, 2019 2:30 am
by zuckie13
Doesn't counting this just become useless today with the proliferation of mobile boarding passes? The count will never be the whole story since some number of customers had no paper.

Re: Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Sun Aug 25, 2019 5:51 am
by hodavid1985
zuckie13 wrote:
Doesn't counting this just become useless today with the proliferation of mobile boarding passes? The count will never be the whole story since some number of customers had no paper.


I saw many agents marked the seq # of passengers using mobile bp so it should not be a problem

Re: Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 2:14 pm
by DmelloMarfi
DmelloMarfi wrote:
It seems to happen at some airports or some airlines, sometimes within the same airport some flights they rip off a portion of your pass and others they just scan it. Sometimes within the same airline at some airports they rip off the portion and sometimes don't. Is it just the gate agent discretion? What's the use of keeping the other portion of the boarding pass at the gate?
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Re: Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 9:03 pm
by teachpdx
In BKK, immigration wants to see your boarding pass after arrival, as arrivals get dumped directly into the transfer area. I guess they want to know that people coming through are actually arriving from a flight and not just cheating the system.
This was an issue for me flying in on Shanghai Airlines as my boarding pass had already been torn at BOTH sides (one at the gate and another when boarding from the bus) and there was nothing left that showed my flight number or seat or date or anything. I had to pull up my airline confirmation email and still had a hard time of it.

Re: Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Tue Sep 10, 2019 2:46 pm
by nws2002
Sometimes the system is acting up or being slow, or there are scanner issues. It is easier to reconcile when you have the boarding passes to count. For mobile, I usually write down the sequence number in these cases, usually on the back of the first boarding pass I took. Some agents do this on every flight out of habit or because they don't trust the system fully.

Before the airline I work for had automated passenger counts, it was actually faster on a quick turn to tear the boarding passes than scan them. With two agents, one tearing the passes and the other stacking them up and counting, you could save a few minutes on the turn and potentially get a flight back out on time. After departure, we'd go in and manually board the passengers using the boarding passes. Now we'd have to enter them into the computer for the automated passenger count before departure anyways, so it is just as fast to scan them.

Re: Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 6:26 am
by gunsontheroof
zuckie13 wrote:
Doesn't counting this just become useless today with the proliferation of mobile boarding passes? The count will never be the whole story since some number of customers had no paper.


I would assume the torn stubs are counted towards the same expected ticket total along with electronic boarding passes. Never been a gate agent before, but allowing for scanned tickets from different delivery options (physical passes, e-passes, etc) to count towards the same ticket pool is pretty standard practice in the online ticketing service industry.

Re: Why do some airlines/airports still rip off a portion of your boarding pass at boarding?

Posted: Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:30 pm
by DmelloMarfi
gunsontheroof wrote:
zuckie13 wrote:
Doesn't counting this just become useless today with the proliferation of mobile boarding passes? The count will never be the whole story since some number of customers had no paper internet sweepstakes cafe software companies


I would assume the torn stubs are counted towards the same expected ticket total along with electronic boarding passes. Never been a gate agent before, but allowing for scanned tickets from different delivery options (physical passes, e-passes, etc) to count towards the same ticket pool is pretty standard practice in the online ticketing service industry.


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