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777-200 Engines

Posted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 2:59 pm
by yyzmdw
Besides the usual reasoning of 'airlines take whatever the best deal from all of the engine OEMs is', how might they have chosen between PW, RR, and GE engines for a 772 order? I heard in another thread that the trents are lighter by 2000 lbs per engine and thus provide increased range for the -200ER. Why for example would BA order GEs and then RR engines? Are there efficiency and range differences?

Re: 777-200 Engines

Posted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 3:12 pm
by Blockplus
Ge is a higher thrust engine for better short field performance. Nrt-ewr is a prime example. The 200s were weight limited until The 90 were updated to the 94b engine mod and are now able to max out the cargo

Re: 777-200 Engines

Posted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 8:56 pm
by Turnhouse1
yyzmdw wrote:
Besides the usual reasoning of 'airlines take whatever the best deal from all of the engine OEMs is', how might they have chosen between PW, RR, and GE engines for a 772 order? I heard in another thread that the trents are lighter by 2000 lbs per engine and thus provide increased range for the -200ER. Why for example would BA order GEs and then RR engines? Are there efficiency and range differences?


The RR powered BA 77Es (G-YMM_) are used on the longer routes such as EZE, so that would support your extra range theory, the GE powered ones (G-VII_) stick to shorter routes such as the USA or Caribbean.

Re: 777-200 Engines

Posted: Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:12 am
by LAX772LR
Turnhouse1 wrote:
yyzmdw wrote:
Besides the usual reasoning of 'airlines take whatever the best deal from all of the engine OEMs is', how might they have chosen between PW, RR, and GE engines for a 772 order? I heard in another thread that the trents are lighter by 2000 lbs per engine and thus provide increased range for the -200ER. Why for example would BA order GEs and then RR engines? Are there efficiency and range differences?


The RR powered BA 77Es (G-YMM_) are used on the longer routes such as EZE, so that would support your extra range theory, the GE powered ones (G-VII_) stick to shorter routes such as the USA or Caribbean.

That doesn't have much to do with engine weight. The G-YMM* series are rated at 656,000lb MTOW, whereas the G-VII* series' weights are lower.

Re: 777-200 Engines

Posted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 11:23 pm
by AA737-823
A lot of it has to do with existing business relationships.
We've seen a lot (though not all) of CFM56 Airbus operators go with the LEAP.
We've seen a lot (though not all) of V2500 Airbus operators go with the GTF.

United was a fairly loyal PW customer for decades (the PW not being available on the DC-10 at launch).
As was NW.

Air France is a long-standing GE customer. They continued that with the A380 and 787.

BA and Rolls Royce.

Then there's Delta... the Southern Belle that dances with everyone at the ball.

Once infrastructure, support contracts, etc are in place, it's a monumental effort to try to "just switch."
And at the end of the day, most engines are generally comparable. While one might be more efficient in the climb (RB211), the other is more efficient in the cruise (PW2000).
So unless a manufacturer decides to make an offer that a carrier can't refuse, most of this stuff just sorta comes out in the wash.

Re: 777-200 Engines

Posted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 11:56 pm
by AirKevin
yyzmdw wrote:
Why for example would BA order GEs and then RR engines? Are there efficiency and range differences?

If I remember right, they weren't satisfied with the performance of the GE90s, so went with Rolls-Royce for their next order.

Re: 777-200 Engines

Posted: Wed Sep 04, 2019 4:06 pm
by LH707330
AirKevin wrote:
yyzmdw wrote:
Why for example would BA order GEs and then RR engines? Are there efficiency and range differences?

If I remember right, they weren't satisfied with the performance of the GE90s, so went with Rolls-Royce for their next order.

The GE is better at longer ranges than the RR, what drove the GE decision at BA was a combination of factors:

1. Initially, GE threw in a MX deal that was too good to refuse, so BA bought GE on their first 777s
2. The early GE90s had teething problems that BA was not happy with
3. BA had deposits on several more 747-400s with RR engines, then wanted to downsize
4. BA used the deposits for 777 with RR

The regos indicate which ones are in which bucket, as BA has a system of inside jokes for these:

G-VII* for the early GE 777s (VII is Roman 7)
G-YMM* for the later RR 777s (YMM = Year 2k, roughly when they were ordered/delivered)

There are also a few oddballs (e.g. G-RAES is a GE, named in honor of the Royal Aeronautical Society).