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Why Two Tails on most New Military Jets?

Posted: Sat Aug 31, 2019 2:34 pm
by frmrCapCadet
Are there only longish highly technical reasons? My naive observation is that the back end of most of these aircraft rather than tapering close to a point, are squared off like a box, hence needing more vertical tail surface, one on each side.

Re: Why Two Tails on most New Military Jets?

Posted: Sat Aug 31, 2019 3:12 pm
by GalaxyFlyer
The F-18 uses twin tails to create more pitch control by rotating both panels leading edge out. Fighters often work at very high AoA, so need powerful rudders to position the nose in a fight.

GF

Re: Why Two Tails on most New Military Jets?

Posted: Sat Aug 31, 2019 6:10 pm
by Armadillo1
at high AoA single vertical stabiliser is in shadow of fuselage.
for those still with single stabiliser there some extra surface to provide some control at high AoA, but current fighters is a "supermaneuverability" aircraft (actually "supercontrolable") able to do "cobra" and even more complex maneuveres so they need maximum control with fine tune vortexes from leading-edge extension to vertical stabiliers.

on MiG-23, a folding "opposite stabiliser" used.
Image
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on F-16, a 2 small surfaces at almost the same place
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Re: Why Two Tails on most New Military Jets?

Posted: Sun Sep 01, 2019 12:40 pm
by frmrCapCadet
Thanks for replies and pictures.

Re: Why Two Tails on most New Military Jets?

Posted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 12:43 am
by Starlionblue
- Two smaller rudders make it easier to fit the aircraft into a cramped carrier hangar deck, especially if you can fold them.
- Additional control authority at high AoA.
- Redundancy if one is damaged in combat.

Re: Why Two Tails on most New Military Jets?

Posted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 9:38 am
by mxaxai
Stealth requires certain angles, vertical surfaces are not ideal