Williamsb747
Topic Author
Posts: 88
Joined: Fri May 17, 2019 9:14 am

career choice?

Wed Feb 05, 2020 5:46 am

Apologies if this is the wrong forum for this..

Hi. As this website is filled with people more knowledgeable in aviation than I, I was hoping that someone might be able to help me.
I am a grade 12 student looking at different university degree and career options , I know for a fact that I want the job to be something related to aviation but I'm not sure what degree I should do. I'm highly interested in aerodynamics and the economics of a flight but the university I'm hoping to get into doesn't have Aeronautical engineering nor anything related to flight route operations(if that's a thing), hence my questions.

1. What degree is best for route manager or operations in general? ie work to start a new route, add frequencies and or increase the size of aircraft on a route working for an airline or airport.
2. Is a mechanical engineering degree enough to get a job in aeronautics?

ps. Im good at and enjoy math and physics. I'm based in Cape Town and can't afford out of country education(damn you international student fees) if any of this helps.

Williams-
B747>A340>A350>B777>MD11>B767>B757>MD88/90>B787>A380>A330>A220>A320>B737.
CPT JNB
 
shamrock137
Posts: 346
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2005 7:10 am

Re: career choice?

Wed Feb 05, 2020 12:51 pm

You don't need a specific aviation related degree to succeed in the industry, even in technical areas like engineering. But in the areas you're interested, route/network planning, and operations, an engineering degree would be fine. A route analyst will need good mathematics and statistics skills, the ability to present information effectively, public speaking skills, problem solving skills and a good overall knowledge of the industry and demand cycles. You'll be looking at things such as revenue, demand forecasts, and industry specific measures such as RASM and CASM.

Operations is a pretty wide field, you have local ops staff at the airport, network ops staff in the headquarters, and even that is broken down into departments such as crew planning, maintenance planning, network controller, customer service controllers, dispatch and flight planning, weather and meteorology.

My advice would be not to worry too much about your specific degree. Pick something you'll enjoy studying, and within that you can find ways to incorporate aviation into your studies. For example if you're in a management or business class, and you're assigned a project such as develop a business plan, you could choose to develop a plan for a small airline, or an aviation related company.
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Williamsb747
Topic Author
Posts: 88
Joined: Fri May 17, 2019 9:14 am

Re: career choice?

Thu Feb 06, 2020 6:59 am

shamrock137 wrote:
You don't need a specific aviation related degree to succeed in the industry, even in technical areas like engineering. But in the areas you're interested, route/network planning, and operations, an engineering degree would be fine. A route analyst will need good mathematics and statistics skills, the ability to present information effectively, public speaking skills, problem solving skills and a good overall knowledge of the industry and demand cycles. You'll be looking at things such as revenue, demand forecasts, and industry specific measures such as RASM and CASM.

Operations is a pretty wide field, you have local ops staff at the airport, network ops staff in the headquarters, and even that is broken down into departments such as crew planning, maintenance planning, network controller, customer service controllers, dispatch and flight planning, weather and meteorology.

My advice would be not to worry too much about your specific degree. Pick something you'll enjoy studying, and within that you can find ways to incorporate aviation into your studies. For example if you're in a management or business class, and you're assigned a project such as develop a business plan, you could choose to develop a plan for a small airline, or an aviation related company.


Thank you. Your information really put my mind at ease.

Williams-
B747>A340>A350>B777>MD11>B767>B757>MD88/90>B787>A380>A330>A220>A320>B737.
CPT JNB
 
mxaxai
Posts: 1329
Joined: Sat Jun 18, 2016 7:29 am

Re: career choice?

Tue Feb 11, 2020 4:35 pm

Williamsb747 wrote:
2. Is a mechanical engineering degree enough to get a job in aeronautics?

ps. Im good at and enjoy math and physics. I'm based in Cape Town and can't afford out of country education(damn you international student fees) if any of this helps.

Williams-

Yes. Virtually any engineering degree can get you a job in aerospace engineering - it just depends on what exactly you'll end up doing. An electrical engineering degree probably won't give you the skills required to do aerodynamic simulations. Mechanical engineering probably won't teach you enough to let you design a FBW software. I highly recommend classes that teach you some computer science and simulation technology if you want to get into aerodynamics, on the other hand a pure computer science degree won't teach you anything about fundamentals of aerodynamics. Broaden your view, aviation is often interdisciplinary.

Also remember that most degrees not only open up careers in aviation but also elsewhere. If you don't focus on aerospace-related companies after graduation there's a good chance that you'll do a career in other branches, e. g. automotive engineering. They'll take you just as happily.

Further, consider whether your country or hometown has an aerospace industry, or if you would be willing to move towards the industry. It's a heavily localised industry, both operation and manufacturing. There are very few airlines and OEMs compared to other industries - general mechanical engineering will get you a job anywhere but aerospace engineering won't.

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