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Moses Lake - Stored 737-8MAX Nosewheel - secured to concrete blocks

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2020 9:17 pm
by 889091
Today's photographer's choice pic on Airliners.net
Why is the nosewheel anchored to 2 concrete blocks? In comparison, the MAXs stored in Boeing Field don't seem to have them. What's its purpose? In case of severe winds?

Moses Lake:
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Boeing Field:
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Re: Moses Lake - Stored 737-8MAX Nosewheel - secured to concrete blocks

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2020 9:39 pm
by GalaxyFlyer
That’s a fairly standard mooring plan to ensure high winds don’t move the plane. Can’t say about Boeing field, but Moses Lake is in the interior and subject to thunderstorms and Chinook winds.

Re: Moses Lake - Stored 737-8MAX Nosewheel - secured to concrete blocks

Posted: Sat Jun 27, 2020 9:09 am
by 889091
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
That’s a fairly standard mooring plan to ensure high winds don’t move the plane. Can’t say about Boeing field, but Moses Lake is in the interior and subject to thunderstorms and Chinook winds.


Thanks GalaxyFlyer.

I assume the mobile fan/AC unit with ducting is used to occasionally ventilate the air the cabin to reduce the chances of fungus/mildew? It is also interesting to note that Moses Lake has a 1:1 ratio for these units - no wonder storing these birds is costing BCA an arm and a leg.

Re: Moses Lake - Stored 737-8MAX Nosewheel - secured to concrete blocks

Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 3:06 am
by Starlionblue
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
That’s a fairly standard mooring plan to ensure high winds don’t move the plane. Can’t say about Boeing field, but Moses Lake is in the interior and subject to thunderstorms and Chinook winds.


In tropical storm season, aircraft noses semi-regularly shift several meters sideways whilst sitting on the ground. Yes, with chocks on! That tail is one big weathervane.

Re: Moses Lake - Stored 737-8MAX Nosewheel - secured to concrete blocks

Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 12:30 pm
by 889091
Don't they also need to rotate the tyres a little every so often to prevent flat spots?

With all the wheels taped up like that, the only way I can envision that procedure being executed is to jack the whole plane up, then rotate the wheels. Wouldn't it be easier to push it back/forward and leave the wheels un-taped? The discs are carbon nowadays, so those can't really rust. What sort of corrosion can set it within the nosewheel/MLG area for a storage period of let's say 18-24 months?

SQ's birds don't seem to have that level of "taped-up efficiency" in Alice Springs. Granted, these are not brand spanking new aircraft.
- photo taken from Sam Chui's website
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Re: Moses Lake - Stored 737-8MAX Nosewheel - secured to concrete blocks

Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 4:17 pm
by Wacker1000
889091 wrote:
Don't they also need to rotate the tyres a little every so often to prevent flat spots?

With all the wheels taped up like that, the only way I can envision that procedure being executed is to jack the whole plane up, then rotate the wheels. Wouldn't it be easier to push it back/forward and leave the wheels un-taped? The discs are carbon nowadays, so those can't really rust. What sort of corrosion can set it within the nosewheel/MLG area for a storage period of let's say 18-24 months?

SQ's birds don't seem to have that level of "taped-up efficiency" in Alice Springs. Granted, these are not brand spanking new aircraft.


They likely aren't following OEM storage procedures and Boeing is. Tires and engines should be covered (among other things) for longer term storage. Engines are supposed to be preserved and stored with desiccant. Usually "longer term" requirements kick in somewhere between 2 weeks and a month.

The aircraft should be moved occasionally if you care about not having to replace all of the tires. Covering the tires prevents UV from degrading the rubber.

Re: Moses Lake - Stored 737-8MAX Nosewheel - secured to concrete blocks

Posted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 12:30 am
by Dalmd88
I don't think the tires are taped. I think it's just cover placed over the tire to protect it from UV light.

As for why the blocks, It is pretty windy in Moses Lake. Boeing uses that airport of all the extreme cross wind landing test.

Re: Moses Lake - Stored 737-8MAX Nosewheel - secured to concrete blocks

Posted: Wed Jul 01, 2020 8:06 pm
by Ricon650
There are actually 3 blocks holding down the NLG. Using concrete blocks is an option vs. having a heavy aircraft loaded with fuel. Using a axle jack is a quick way to spin the tires without jacking the entire aircraft.