Moderators: richierich, ua900, PanAm_DC10, hOMSaR

 
Trimeresurus
Topic Author
Posts: 118
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 6:06 pm

How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 9:23 am

Like MD80s, Embraers. Do they have removable fuel tanks just for the delivery flight?
 
pythoniels
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Jul 07, 2006 7:54 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 9:31 am

I know for the KLM Cityhopper fleet that got delivered, they took of and refueled at BSB and then flew directly to the Canary Islands for another refuel and then Straight to AMS.

Otherwise Canada/Greenland//KEF/Dub stops seem to make sense.
 
VSMUT
Posts: 5497
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 11:40 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 9:38 am

The Atlantic is small. Most regional airliners can get across with just one fuel stop in Greenland or Iceland.
 
konrad
Posts: 599
Joined: Fri Mar 15, 2002 3:54 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 10:11 am

Embraer routing to Europe: SJK-REC-SID-AGP-WAW

http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=SJK-REC-SID-AGP-WAW
 
dergay
Posts: 180
Joined: Tue Dec 26, 2006 8:42 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 10:53 am

pythoniels wrote:
I know for the KLM Cityhopper fleet that got delivered, they took of and refueled at BSB and then flew directly to the Canary Islands for another refuel and then Straight to AMS.

Otherwise Canada/Greenland//KEF/Dub stops seem to make sense.


KLM delivery through FAO on 15th March, 2018.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] ... 278918033/
 
User avatar
BawliBooch
Posts: 1592
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2016 4:24 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 11:26 am

I guess extra bladder type tanks should get the plane across.

In any case, Atlantic is still bridgeable with many stops available on a northerly route.

I wonder how airlines in the Pacific ocean like Tahiti Airlines/ Aloha etc get their short range aircraft to and fro from the mainland.
 
dergay
Posts: 180
Joined: Tue Dec 26, 2006 8:42 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 11:31 am

BawliBooch wrote:
I guess extra bladder type tanks should get the plane across.

In any case, Atlantic is still bridgeable with many stops available on a northerly route.

I wonder how airlines in the Pacific ocean like Tahiti Airlines/ Aloha etc get their short range aircraft to and fro from the mainland.


To answer your question, this is a J-Air (J.A.L.) EM-170 on delivery from Brasil via LCA - yes Larnaca, Cyprus.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] ... 4ZL-fppKum

How far East is West?
 
User avatar
BawliBooch
Posts: 1592
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2016 4:24 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 11:34 am

dergay wrote:
To answer your question, this is a J-Air (J.A.L.) EM-170 on delivery from Brasil via LCA - yes Larnaca, Cyprus.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] ... 4ZL-fppKum

How far East is West?


How would an airline like Aloha get their 737-200 to the mainland for a major maintenance check? Hawai, Tahiti etc are a long way both from Asia and US mainland?
 
tommy1808
Posts: 14639
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2013 3:24 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 11:35 am

BawliBooch wrote:
I wonder how airlines in the Pacific ocean like Tahiti Airlines/ Aloha etc get their short range aircraft to and fro from the mainland.


since their ATR have ETOPS 120 min they should be able to fly them there.

best regards
Thomas
 
djb77
Posts: 264
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2001 4:00 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 11:46 am

Widerøe's Embraer E190-E2 were delivered direct from Brazil to Norway with a single stop in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria. A second, provisional refueling stop in Aberdeen, Scotland, was scheduled but not required. Although the aircraft were void of passengers, baggage and cargo, this is still pretty good-going.
 
PlymSpotter
Posts: 10844
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 7:32 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 11:49 am

I recall reading an article about Hawaiian's B717s - they were fitted with a pair of large tanks in the passenger cabin for the ferry flight.
 
MIflyer12
Posts: 9881
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:58 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 11:51 am

Absent passenger and bag weight, RJs have meaningful range. They don't need typical passenger routes, as the citation of SJK-REC-SID-AGP-WAW demonstrates.
 
airbazar
Posts: 10432
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2003 11:12 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 12:49 pm

BawliBooch wrote:

How would an airline like Aloha get their 737-200 to the mainland for a major maintenance check? Hawai, Tahiti etc are a long way both from Asia and US mainland?

Tahiti is not that challenging. There are lots of island hopping options to get there:
http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=pom-hir-hi ... =wls&DU=nm
 
tommy1808
Posts: 14639
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2013 3:24 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 12:53 pm

NightStar wrote:
VSMUT wrote:
The Atlantic is small. Most regional airliners can get across with just one fuel stop in Greenland or Iceland.


The Atlantic is "small!!??" Are you serious??

It is the world's second largest ocean in area. The Pacific is not even close to doubling it at only roughly 50% larger. The Pacific is wider but there is nothing small about the Atlantic.


east <-> west the shortest hop across the Atlantic is less than 3000 km. Compared to the pacific it is kinda narrow, but of course not small in surface area.

best regards
Thomas
 
B777LRF
Posts: 2874
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 4:23 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 1:14 pm

ATR delivers their by air; you might be surprised how far a -600 will go when there's no payload at all on board, the crew is only 2-4 people, and a routing that's quite often off the beaten tracks allowing for optimum speed; 8-9 hours, easy. According to this story, it'll do 5,5 hours / 1400 nm with a football team onboard! viewtopic.php?t=593431

NightStar wrote:
VSMUT wrote:
The Atlantic is small. Most regional airliners can get across with just one fuel stop in Greenland or Iceland.


The Atlantic is "small!!??" Are you serious??

It is the world's second largest ocean in area. The Pacific is not even close to doubling it at only roughly 50% larger. The Pacific is wider but there is nothing small about the Atlantic.


VSMUT is absolutely correct; most regional airliners (built either side of the pond) can make the crossing with one fuel stop. Can't say the same for the Pacific.

In aviation terms, precisely because it's relatively narrow, an Atlantic crossing is considerably smaller than a Pacific ditto.

There is a reason the Pacific wasn't crossed until 1931, when the Atlantic had been won in 1919.
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 8077
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 2:19 pm

I saw a mere “slip of a lass” pickup a new Cessna 152 and fly it to Iceland. Ferry tank and survival equipment added at KBGR. Fly the Pacific for awhile and the North Atlantic seems like a wide river. They ferry DHC-6-400 all over the world, mostly without ferry tanks. Lots of tech stops across Canada, Greenland, Iceland and Scotland for short range planes.
 
VSMUT
Posts: 5497
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 11:40 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 2:53 pm

tommy1808 wrote:
BawliBooch wrote:
I wonder how airlines in the Pacific ocean like Tahiti Airlines/ Aloha etc get their short range aircraft to and fro from the mainland.


since their ATR have ETOPS 120 min they should be able to fly them there.

best regards
Thomas


Do ETOPS rules apply to delivery flights? Isn't it commercial operations only?
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 8077
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 3:38 pm

Just commercial flights, delivery is private ops.
 
nicode
Posts: 301
Joined: Fri May 11, 2012 7:58 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 4:18 pm

BawliBooch wrote:
I wonder how airlines in the Pacific ocean like Tahiti Airlines/ Aloha etc get their short range aircraft to and fro from the mainland.

ATRs for Air Tahiti are routed through Asia, not America.
Most of ATR are delivered this way : Toulouse (France) - Alexandria (Egypt) - Al Ain (UAE) - Chennai or Nagpur (India) - Kuala Lampur (Malaysia) - Kupang (Timor Oriental) - Cairns (Australia) - Nadi (Fidji) and then Papeete (French Polynesia).

https://www.facebook.com/AVgeeksTahiti/ ... =3&theater
 
clipperlondon
Posts: 89
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2019 4:43 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 4:33 pm

nicode wrote:
BawliBooch wrote:
I wonder how airlines in the Pacific ocean like Tahiti Airlines/ Aloha etc get their short range aircraft to and fro from the mainland.

ATRs for Air Tahiti are routed through Asia, not America.
Most of ATR are delivered this way : Toulouse (France) - Alexandria (Egypt) - Al Ain (UAE) - Chennai or Nagpur (India) - Kuala Lampur (Malaysia) - Kupang (Timor Oriental) - Cairns (Australia) - Nadi (Fidji) and then Papeete (French Polynesia).

https://www.facebook.com/AVgeeksTahiti/ ... =3&theater


Surely its just a matter of scale?

I don't know the exact mileage but island/mainland hopping is common.

Interesting route details, thank you very much!
 
enplaned
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 9:49 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 4:46 pm

tommy1808 wrote:
NightStar wrote:
VSMUT wrote:
The Atlantic is small. Most regional airliners can get across with just one fuel stop in Greenland or Iceland.


The Atlantic is "small!!??" Are you serious??

It is the world's second largest ocean in area. The Pacific is not even close to doubling it at only roughly 50% larger. The Pacific is wider but there is nothing small about the Atlantic.


east <-> west the shortest hop across the Atlantic is less than 3000 km. Compared to the pacific it is kinda narrow, but of course not small in surface area.

best regards
Thomas


MD-80s across the Pacific could go one of two ways - in the summer time via ANC - e.g. Japan-ANC-lower 48. With no load (other than ballast up front), they had considerably more range than with loaded.

In the winter, you can go via Midway Island and Hawaii. Again, an unloaded MD-80 (other than nose ballast) could easily do the Hawaii-Mainland leg (though bear in mind, I think that's in the direction of the prevailing winds).

I don't recall them needing an aux tank to do this.
 
clipperlondon
Posts: 89
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2019 4:43 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 4:53 pm

enplaned wrote:
tommy1808 wrote:
NightStar wrote:

The Atlantic is "small!!??" Are you serious??

It is the world's second largest ocean in area. The Pacific is not even close to doubling it at only roughly 50% larger. The Pacific is wider but there is nothing small about the Atlantic.


east <-> west the shortest hop across the Atlantic is less than 3000 km. Compared to the pacific it is kinda narrow, but of course not small in surface area.

best regards
Thomas


MD-80s across the Pacific could go one of two ways - in the summer time via ANC - e.g. Japan-ANC-lower 48. With no load (other than ballast up front), they had considerably more range than with loaded.

In the winter, you can go via Midway Island and Hawaii. Again, an unloaded MD-80 (other than nose ballast) could easily do the Hawaii-Mainland leg (though bear in mind, I think that's in the direction of the prevailing winds).

I don't recall them needing an aux tank to do this.


Thats what I meant, thank you . Plenty of islands and hugging the coast is also a consideration too
 
N1120A
Posts: 26793
Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2003 5:40 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Sep 08, 2020 8:00 pm

With favorable winds, 737s have been delivered non-stop from Seattle to Europe. Something like a CRJ shouldn't have an issue getting across from Montreal, either with a stop in the Maritimes or in Iceland or maybe non-stop. Going West, something like an ATR will probably have to stop somewhere, but still not really an issue.
 
User avatar
hongkongflyer
Posts: 856
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2014 8:23 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Wed Sep 09, 2020 2:56 am

I remember some E170/190 were delivered to China via Europe and Mid-East
 
VSMUT
Posts: 5497
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 11:40 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Wed Sep 09, 2020 9:49 am

N1120A wrote:
With favorable winds, 737s have been delivered non-stop from Seattle to Europe. Something like a CRJ shouldn't have an issue getting across from Montreal, either with a stop in the Maritimes or in Iceland or maybe non-stop. Going West, something like an ATR will probably have to stop somewhere, but still not really an issue.


An ATR should be able to go non-stop from Ireland to Canada. It has fuel for 9 hours. In zero wind conditions, it will "only" take 5:30. Even with todays headwinds, it would take 7 hours.
 
bhill
Posts: 1890
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2001 8:28 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Thu Sep 10, 2020 6:11 pm

They are stuffed in GalaxyFlyer's ride and shuttled over....pretty sure they use aux tanks in the cabin to haul the fuel needed for the trip, some seats will need to be removed....
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 8077
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Thu Sep 10, 2020 7:54 pm

bhill wrote:
They are stuffed in GalaxyFlyer's ride and shuttled over....pretty sure they use aux tanks in the cabin to haul the fuel needed for the trip, some seats will need to be removed....


The only planes I ever moved was a wrecked Strike Eagle out of EGUL, but there was a “sled” like device to deliver T-38/F-5s. Lots of helicopters, dammed every one leaked fuel, too. Boats leaked salt water, but that was corrosive, not explosive.

Oh, I forgot, I brought the US Aerobatic from KDOV to ETAR (Ramstein) during the 90s for the WAC. 8 planes filled up the cargo with a weight of about 12,000#. Then, there was the NatGeo sponsored Vickers Vimy brought from Travis to Mildenhall for its flight to Asia.
 
Trimeresurus
Topic Author
Posts: 118
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 6:06 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Thu Sep 10, 2020 9:28 pm

GalaxyFlyer wrote:
Lots of helicopters, dammed every one leaked fuel, too. Boats leaked salt water, but that was corrosive, not explosive.


I thought Jet A-1/kerosene wasn't very explosive, being in similar texture and molecular structure to diesel and all. It's hard to accidentally light it on fire, you have to try.
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 8077
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Thu Sep 10, 2020 10:00 pm

It’s not explosive, intended as a hyperbolic comment opposing salt water.it. Both create clean up problems and fuel does give off some nasty fumes in an enclosed environment.
 
tnair1974
Posts: 324
Joined: Sun Sep 15, 2019 5:37 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Sun Sep 20, 2020 10:39 pm

PlymSpotter wrote:
I recall reading an article about Hawaiian's B717s - they were fitted with a pair of large tanks in the passenger cabin for the ferry flight.

Yes. Decades ago, Aloha and Hawaiian were doing this with their 732s and D95s respectively. Not only for delivery, but ferry flights back to the mainland for heavy maintenance.

An interesting side note is that when Hawaiian replaced their D95s with 717s, something along the lines of one less portable tank was needed due to the 717's improved fuel efficiency.
 
User avatar
rmoore7734
Posts: 236
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 7:59 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Mon Oct 05, 2020 3:22 pm

BawliBooch wrote:
dergay wrote:


How would an airline like Aloha get their 737-200 to the mainland for a major maintenance check? Hawai, Tahiti etc are a long way both from Asia and US mainland?


http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=hnl-mdy-adk-anc-pae&DU=nm
 
Max Q
Posts: 9051
Joined: Wed May 09, 2001 12:40 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Mon Oct 05, 2020 9:14 pm

GalaxyFlyer wrote:
I saw a mere “slip of a lass” pickup a new Cessna 152 and fly it to Iceland. Ferry tank and survival equipment added at KBGR. Fly the Pacific for awhile and the North Atlantic seems like a wide river. They ferry DHC-6-400 all over the world, mostly without ferry tanks. Lots of tech stops across Canada, Greenland, Iceland and Scotland for short range planes.



Impressive stuff, it’s one thing to ferry twin engine airliners but a single engine piston stuffed with fuel in every nook and cranny with very low cruise speed, limited altitude capability and little if any anti-ice protection is another, entirely different prospect


Very long flight times, cramped cabins and little chance of rescue if that one engine fails require a whole different, somewhat fatalistic attitude for the job
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 8077
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Mon Oct 05, 2020 9:21 pm

Max Q wrote:
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
I saw a mere “slip of a lass” pickup a new Cessna 152 and fly it to Iceland. Ferry tank and survival equipment added at KBGR. Fly the Pacific for awhile and the North Atlantic seems like a wide river. They ferry DHC-6-400 all over the world, mostly without ferry tanks. Lots of tech stops across Canada, Greenland, Iceland and Scotland for short range planes.



Impressive stuff, it’s one thing to ferry twin engine airliners but a single engine piston stuffed with fuel in every nook and cranny with very low cruise speed, limited altitude capability and little if any anti-ice protection is another, entirely different prospect


Very long flight times, cramped cabins and little chance of rescue if that one engine fails require a whole different, somewhat fatalistic attitude for the job


Then talk to the Kenn Borak pilots out of Calgary and their flights to Antarctica in a Twin Otter. I interviewed one for a job with our department. The old TMAAT question, “we’d landed on an island off Antarctica in blinding snow and ice coming from Chile. For three days, the weather continued as we camped in the plane. Finally, the captain decided we’d try to leave even though the weather hadn’t changed much. I refused to fly, the next day it cleared.” My boss looked at me and simply said, “well, he certainly won’t be pushed into a bad decision staying in Paris, if he’ll stay on a frozen island.”
 
User avatar
sjones1975
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2012 12:23 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Wed Oct 07, 2020 3:47 pm

Are there any particularly remote places where aircraft are delivered by ship, either by necessity or for economic convenience (e.g. to avoid the cost of adding temporary fuel bladders)? If so, what's the largest type of aircraft that has been delivered by ship? Would ship delivery only be for very small stuff like GA kits, or do aircraft as large as a turboprop commuter aircraft ever get delivered by ship?
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 8077
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Wed Oct 07, 2020 6:13 pm

Only for very small GA planes and not even a lot then. There’s a pretty good business of ferrying even small-ish single-engine planes around the world. DHC-6-400 are delivered by air everywhere. Single-engine Mooneys, Cessnas and Pipers have been ferried from US to Australia and NZ.
 
VSMUT
Posts: 5497
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 11:40 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Wed Oct 07, 2020 7:21 pm

GalaxyFlyer wrote:
Only for very small GA planes and not even a lot then. There’s a pretty good business of ferrying even small-ish single-engine planes around the world. DHC-6-400 are delivered by air everywhere. Single-engine Mooneys, Cessnas and Pipers have been ferried from US to Australia and NZ.


I've seen a break bulk carrier full of MiG-29s. The entire fleet of the country was simply lifted into the cargo hold and strapped to the deck, then shipped off to be upgraded in another country.

Helicopters often (mostly?) go by ship. Smaller types fit in a container.
 
SoCalPilot
Posts: 154
Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2017 4:37 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Thu Oct 08, 2020 1:26 am

Don't know if they still do but Mokulele use to ferry their Cessna 208's from Hawaii to California. 10+ hours in a small Caravan over water the whole time. No thanks.
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 8077
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Thu Oct 08, 2020 3:05 am

VSMUT wrote:
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
Only for very small GA planes and not even a lot then. There’s a pretty good business of ferrying even small-ish single-engine planes around the world. DHC-6-400 are delivered by air everywhere. Single-engine Mooneys, Cessnas and Pipers have been ferried from US to Australia and NZ.


I've seen a break bulk carrier full of MiG-29s. The entire fleet of the country was simply lifted into the cargo hold and strapped to the deck, then shipped off to be upgraded in another country.

Helicopters often (mostly?) go by ship. Smaller types fit in a container.


Certain diplomatic complications ferrying MiGs around, so yes, shipped. Helicopters just aren’t possible to ferry overwater legs, ferry tanks or not.
 
CRJ900
Posts: 2410
Joined: Wed Jun 02, 2004 2:48 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Thu Oct 08, 2020 10:09 pm

I think I read here on a.net that the Dash 8-400 (formerly known as Q400) can fly about six hours non-stop on ferry flights, which sounds about right with 5,500 kg of fuel in standard wing tanks and burning about 850-900 kg pr hour.
 
paperwastage
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed May 29, 2019 11:45 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Thu Oct 08, 2020 11:09 pm

hongkongflyer wrote:
I remember some E170/190 were delivered to China via Europe and Mid-East

https://www.staradvertiser.com/2018/02/ ... -to-china/
https://onemileatatime.com/united-regional-jet-china/

this happened too (Colorado-Seattle-Anchorage-Anadyr(Russia)-Magadan(Russia)-Vladivostok(Russia)-Hohhot(China)
 
User avatar
Web500sjc
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 4:23 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Fri Oct 09, 2020 4:29 pm

CRJ900 wrote:
I think I read here on a.net that the Dash 8-400 (formerly known as Q400) can fly about six hours non-stop on ferry flights, which sounds about right with 5,500 kg of fuel in standard wing tanks and burning about 850-900 kg pr hour.

https://thepointsguy.com/news/air-green ... op-flight/

Air Greenland flew a DHC-8-200 7 hours and 52 minutes from CPH- Nuuk Greenland on a revenue flight in April 2020. 2 pilots, 1 FA, and a doctor, who was the only passenger, were all that the airplane carried in addition to fuel. Granted the flight was originally planned with a fuel stop in KEF, but they were able to make it nonstop.
 
FlyHossD
Posts: 2206
Joined: Mon Nov 02, 2009 3:45 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Fri Oct 09, 2020 4:55 pm

VSMUT wrote:
N1120A wrote:
With favorable winds, 737s have been delivered non-stop from Seattle to Europe. Something like a CRJ shouldn't have an issue getting across from Montreal, either with a stop in the Maritimes or in Iceland or maybe non-stop. Going West, something like an ATR will probably have to stop somewhere, but still not really an issue.


An ATR should be able to go non-stop from Ireland to Canada. It has fuel for 9 hours. In zero wind conditions, it will "only" take 5:30. Even with todays headwinds, it would take 7 hours.


IIRC, when we ferried new ATR-42s to the U.S. bases, it was TLS, SNN, REK, BGR then on to the appropriate hub. The only additional equipment was a single HF radio and a life raft in the forward cargo area. Once in the U.S., the HF radio and raft were removed and sent back to TLS for the next ferry.

So as not to get another post deleted as not on topic, I won't tell a story or two about such ferry flights.
 
User avatar
sjones1975
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2012 12:23 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Fri Oct 09, 2020 6:18 pm

FlyHossD wrote:
So as not to get another post deleted as not on topic, I won't tell a story or two about such ferry flights.


Oh come on, that kind of stuff from pilots and industry insiders is what makes this site interesting!
 
FlyHossD
Posts: 2206
Joined: Mon Nov 02, 2009 3:45 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Fri Oct 09, 2020 7:35 pm

sjones1975 wrote:
FlyHossD wrote:
So as not to get another post deleted as not on topic, I won't tell a story or two about such ferry flights.


Oh come on, that kind of stuff from pilots and industry insiders is what makes this site interesting!


But's it's also apparently what offends at least a few...
 
User avatar
SAAFNAV
Posts: 635
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 5:41 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Sat Oct 10, 2020 6:58 am

FlyHossD wrote:
But's it's also apparently what offends at least a few...


Contrary to popular believe, one has no obligation to prevent others from their perceived offensive 'triggers'.
They are welcome to skip over it, the rest of us would love to read it.
 
Nicoeddf
Posts: 1090
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 7:13 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Sun Oct 11, 2020 12:10 pm

SAAFNAV wrote:
FlyHossD wrote:
But's it's also apparently what offends at least a few...


Contrary to popular believe, one has no obligation to prevent others from their perceived offensive 'triggers'.
They are welcome to skip over it, the rest of us would love to read it.


That’s true until the trigger (delete-) happy mods come to call you to order. ;-)

That said, FlyHossD, I think some stories about those ferry flights would certainly fit into the topic on hand without risk of deletion, even on this site.
 
AirBoat
Posts: 71
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2015 11:58 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:23 am

The SAAF Gripens were put on a RoRo ship in Sweden and offloaded in Cape Town, and then towed along the city streets to afb Ysterplaat, with a mechanic sitting on each wingtip to look out for lamp poles.
Ferrying military planes is very difficult.
 
AirBoat
Posts: 71
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2015 11:58 am

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:27 am

there is a foto at article below:

The SAAF receives Gripens 17-19
Written by Dean Wingrin & defenceWeb -11th Apr 2011
 
User avatar
SAAFNAV
Posts: 635
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 5:41 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Oct 13, 2020 6:46 am

AirBoat wrote:
The SAAF Gripens were put on a RoRo ship in Sweden and offloaded in Cape Town, and then towed along the city streets to afb Ysterplaat, with a mechanic sitting on each wingtip to look out for lamp poles.
Ferrying military planes is very difficult.
AirBoat wrote:
there is a foto at article below:

The SAAF receives Gripens 17-19
Written by Dean Wingrin & defenceWeb -11th Apr 2011


I was stationed at AFB Ysterplaat when the last of the order was delivered. It wasn't a RO-RO ship, but a normal bulk carrier with the trestles welded to the floor.
Some photos:

Image
Image
Image


(note: photos was from the PR section of the base)
 
User avatar
flyingturtle
Posts: 6165
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 1:39 pm

Re: How are regional airliners delivered to the other side of Atlantic?

Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:15 am

Some C-47 were delivered to the Soviet Union in WW2. I don't know their route, though. Later, the Soviets built lots of copies (Lisunov-2) under license.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Duderocks5539 and 15 guests

Popular Searches On Airliners.net

Top Photos of Last:   24 Hours  •  48 Hours  •  7 Days  •  30 Days  •  180 Days  •  365 Days  •  All Time

Military Aircraft Every type from fighters to helicopters from air forces around the globe

Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos