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MIflyer12
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Re: Regional Airlines

Fri Dec 18, 2020 9:00 pm

Regional airlines where, please?
 
SoCalPilot
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Re: Regional Airlines

Fri Dec 18, 2020 9:25 pm

Very hard to answer this question as there is no generic schedule and it can vary greatly based on how each company is set up and what each pilot bids. Back when I flew turboprops for a regional carrier, my schedule was 4 on 3 off, or at least it was suppose to be.

If I remember correctly it went something like this:

Day -1: Get called by crew scheduling and asked if I can come in early. I don't answer because I don't have to.
Day 1: Commute in for a noon-ish start, fly 4 legs and finish around 9PM or so.
Day 2: Start early afternoon, fly 4 legs and finish late evening again.
Day 3: Early morning start, suppose to fly 4 legs, the flight after the first one gets cancelled and I have a 7 hour unpaid sit in the airport waiting for my last flight.
Day 4: Start early morning, fly 3 legs and finish around noon-ish. Start thinking about what beer I'm going to drink when I get back home, before getting a call from crew scheduling saying that they don't have anyone for a flight the next morning and end up having to stay an extra day.
Day 5: Get paid 7 hours for an hour flight. Go home early that morning.

Once my company started having staffing issues this went to 5 on 2 off, with an early morning start on the first day and late end on the last day which made commuting impossible, so I quit.

Another small carrier I flew for had a completely different bidding process and my trips could have been anywhere from an overnight to 5 days long, it varied based on the bid I was awarded.

Regional part 121 flying was by far my least favorite flying I've done. The only good part about it was being able to jumpseat.
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Regional Airlines

Fri Dec 18, 2020 9:59 pm

And what are the salaries in general in such companies? is it possible to fly in them and earn good money, like in airline and business aviation?
 
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JBo
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Re: Regional Airlines

Fri Dec 18, 2020 10:17 pm

AlexGarmins wrote:
And what are the salaries in general in such companies? is it possible to fly in them and earn good money, like in airline and business aviation?


airlinepilotcentral.com will give you current payscales for all U.S. regionals.
 
SoCalPilot
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Re: Regional Airlines

Fri Dec 18, 2020 10:21 pm

JBo wrote:
AlexGarmins wrote:
And what are the salaries in general in such companies? is it possible to fly in them and earn good money, like in airline and business aviation?


airlinepilotcentral.com will give you current payscales for all U.S. regionals.

Yep, I was just about to reply with this. Usually you can multiple the hourly rate by 1000 to get a general idea of what you'd make in a year. That's just a rough estimate though, that number can change drastically though depending on how you bid and what type of trips you get.
 
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T18
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Re: Regional Airlines

Fri Dec 18, 2020 10:51 pm

As a former scheduler for a US Regional, SoCalPilot hits the nail on the head more or less. Add in the getting Junior Assigned out of the blue and that possibility that you fly a 4 day trip of 12 legs with 12 crews, work 6 days in a row off reserve and get bare min rest too. Pay for FOs is a joke too, that said please keep in mind that scheduler ruining your life makes less than that and likely has zero union or other protection to keep that job if flying isn't covered. Holding a line can help quality of life as can living in or near your base and not needing to commute.

Another point however is my company didn't fly props, So I suspect you may want input from Cape pilots or other EAC operators.
 
AlexGarmins
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Airbus-300 Zero-G

Sat Dec 19, 2020 12:46 am

How to become a pilot of a flying space laboratory like the Airbus 300 Zero-G? What is their work schedule? And what do you need to have for employment?
 
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AngelsDecay
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Re: Airbus-300 Zero-G

Sat Dec 19, 2020 1:21 am

Basically and first you need to build a time traveller machine to go back in time because its now A313 F-WNOV and not the A300 anymore...
 
Woodreau
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Re: Regional Airlines

Sat Dec 19, 2020 3:35 am

The answer varies widely depending on the airline.

The first regional airline I worked was prior to 117 and did not have overnight layovers. All trips started and ended in base each day and did EAS flying flying 19-seat turboprops.

But the typical work week was 4 single-day trips then 2/3 days off. Each day was 8 or 9 legs that blocked and paid 7:30-8:00 or 32 hours / week. 120 hrs/ month. with trips that exceeded the 34/7days or 120/month legality being dropped without pay. That would cause most pilots to call in sick to use sick time to get paid for trips to allow us to pick up the trip that was dropped for legality to regain the pay. Most crews would start time out, reaching their 1200 hours by October.

Hourly pay was $18/hr for first year FO, and I upgraded to 1st year Captain for $26/hr within 6 months going from 700 hrs when i was hired to the ATP 1500hr minimum in 6 months.

QoL was nonexistent and because we were outstation based in out of the way small towns, we used our first day off to commute home and used our last day off to commute back to base.

Flying was plentiful and pilots gained lots of experience in a short amount of time. flying as a crew, we would average 60-70 landings for each pilot as we flew our 120-140 legs that month.

However part 117 killed the 19-seat turboprop operator.

Pay for first half first year FO/second half first year CA was around $30,000. with total 1300 block hours flown that first year as an airline pilot. - as pilots that timed out for the year became assigned to Part 91 reposition ferry flying and maintenance test flying.
Second year, I hit pay dirt - making a whole $32/hr and $45k/year

It was rare to find a pilot that stayed longer than 2-3 years. by then everyone had gotten their 1000 PIC and moved on to other airlines with better QoL for better or worse

During my time at this airline, I had the seniority to bid #1 in every base I was assigned to, but being #1 meant nothing because it was a choice of crappy line #1, crappy line #2, and crappy line #3. In the 24 months I worked for this airline, I was displaced out of base 9 times. so I had 10 bases in 2 years. I would finish flying Saturday night at one base, and on Sunday my base would change and now I had to report to work at the new base on Sunday on the other side of the state, so I'd load all of my crap and COMAT it at the station Saturday night, drive overnight to the new base, report on Sunday and pick up my crap when I was done with work unloading it off the plane when I dutied off Sunday.

Things that are no longer allowed under 117.
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: Airbus-300 Zero-G

Sat Dec 19, 2020 10:22 am

AlexGarmins wrote:
How to become a pilot of a flying space laboratory like the Airbus 300 Zero-G? What is their work schedule? And what do you need to have for employment?


These niche jobs are typically very much "by invitation". You won't get asked if you don't qualify.

At a guess, you need:
- Significant experience in multi-crew, multi-engine jets.
- The right contacts.
- You may also need military and/or test pilot experience.
 
AlexGarmins
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Employment as a pilot Zero-G and other questions about a pilot's career

Sat Dec 19, 2020 10:41 am

1. How to become a pilot for a flying space laboratory like the Airbus 300 Zero-G or B727 Zero-g What is their work schedule? And what do you need to have for employment? Do you need to be a military pilot for this, or is it enough to become a civilian pilot and then try to get a job?

2. Can a jet aerobatic team pilot like the Baltic Bees work part-time as an airline pilot or as a military pilot? And is it possible to become a pilot of Baltic Bees after flying school?
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: Employment as a pilot Zero-G and other questions about a pilot's career

Sat Dec 19, 2020 11:41 am

AlexGarmins wrote:
1. How to become a pilot for a flying space laboratory like the Airbus 300 Zero-G or B727 Zero-g What is their work schedule? And what do you need to have for employment? Do you need to be a military pilot for this, or is it enough to become a civilian pilot and then try to get a job?

2. Can a jet aerobatic team pilot like the Baltic Bees work part-time as an airline pilot or as a military pilot? And is it possible to become a pilot of Baltic Bees after flying school?


1. Answered above.

2. Many aerobatic pilots have other flying jobs, both civilian and military. However, most airlines require pilots to ask permission for any outside employment and impose limitations on flying in other capacities.

No way you'd get a job for an aerobatic team right after flying school. You might be able to build up the technical skills required if you had enough money, but experience is an essential component. Same reason you don't make captain without having been a first officer. Much of the knowledge required can't be taught. It must be "lived".
 
unimproved
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Re: Sports and flying

Sat Dec 19, 2020 11:52 am

AlexGarmins wrote:
Why professional Red Bull Air Race pilots can combine pilot work, but other professional sports cannot?

And there are pilots here who combine extreme sports? How risky is it to do it so as not to get injured and bruised and leave your flying career? How to be careful and should you throw?

Need advice. An interesting question, of course.

Thanks)

Because most other pro sports require a lot more training time. Know of enough pilots who do things like skydiving or rally racing
 
GalaxyFlyer
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Re: Airbus-300 Zero-G

Sat Dec 19, 2020 3:08 pm

Starlionblue wrote:
AlexGarmins wrote:
How to become a pilot of a flying space laboratory like the Airbus 300 Zero-G? What is their work schedule? And what do you need to have for employment?


These niche jobs are typically very much "by invitation". You won't get asked if you don't qualify.

At a guess, you need:
- Significant experience in multi-crew, multi-engine jets.
- The right contacts.
- You may also need military and/or test pilot experience.


You don’t start out seeking these jobs, you learn to fly, gain experience, show talents and personality traits that help, then network with the right people and, yes, get invited. Some of extreme “jobs” specialists possess some particular personalities that you are born with.
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Sports and flying

Sat Dec 19, 2020 4:30 pm

unimproved wrote:
AlexGarmins wrote:
Why professional Red Bull Air Race pilots can combine pilot work, but other professional sports cannot?

And there are pilots here who combine extreme sports? How risky is it to do it so as not to get injured and bruised and leave your flying career? How to be careful and should you throw?

Need advice. An interesting question, of course.

Thanks)

Because most other pro sports require a lot more training time. Know of enough pilots who do things like skydiving or rally racing



Are there any pilots who combine rally? I, of course, did not hear, but just internally. Is aerobatics more difficult than motorsport or not? Just never did aerobatics? And in parachuting, you can also combine work as a pilot? And, in general, in terms of investing energy, is it really easier than everyone else? Thanks for answers. I'm just a novice pilot.
 
GalaxyFlyer
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Re: Employment as a pilot Zero-G and other questions about a pilot's career

Sat Dec 19, 2020 4:44 pm

The psychological profile of racing drivers and top aerobatic pilots is similar, probably includes fighter pilots. There are books and studies on the subject. Sport parachuting doesn’t interfere with an aviation career, it’s just “for pay” where rest cycles become intertwined that’s a problem. Companies may impose other limits as part of policy.
 
AlexGarmins
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Part time aviation

Sat Dec 19, 2020 4:51 pm

What is part time in aviation? And how to use it and find a flight company by part time? How long can you fly part time? And what is the usual operating mode for part time pilots?
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Занятость пилота Zero-G и другие вопросы о карьере пилота

Sat Dec 19, 2020 5:01 pm

GalaxyFlyer wrote:
The psychological profile of racing drivers and top aerobatic pilots is similar, probably includes fighter pilots. There are books and studies on the subject. Sport parachuting doesn’t interfere with an aviation career, it’s just “for pay” where rest cycles become intertwined that’s a problem. Companies may impose other limits as part of policy.



Sorry, but you can get a little more detail. That is, an airplane pilot cannot become a professional rally racer, because there is not enough time or?
 
CRJockey
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Re: Занятость пилота Zero-G и другие вопросы о карьере пилота

Sat Dec 19, 2020 5:53 pm

AlexGarmins wrote:
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
The psychological profile of racing drivers and top aerobatic pilots is similar, probably includes fighter pilots. There are books and studies on the subject. Sport parachuting doesn’t interfere with an aviation career, it’s just “for pay” where rest cycles become intertwined that’s a problem. Companies may impose other limits as part of policy.



Sorry, but you can get a little more detail. That is, an airplane pilot cannot become a professional rally racer, because there is not enough time or?


Just to be sure where you are aiming at: you are neither airline pilot nor professional rally racing driver. Correct?

And your aim is to go from flight school directly into very specialized pilot jobs like zero-G and/or aerobatics, while at the same time pursuing your racing driver career?
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Занятость пилота Zero-G и другие вопросы о карьере пилота

Sat Dec 19, 2020 5:58 pm

CRJockey wrote:
AlexGarmins wrote:
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
The psychological profile of racing drivers and top aerobatic pilots is similar, probably includes fighter pilots. There are books and studies on the subject. Sport parachuting doesn’t interfere with an aviation career, it’s just “for pay” where rest cycles become intertwined that’s a problem. Companies may impose other limits as part of policy.



Sorry, but you can get a little more detail. That is, an airplane pilot cannot become a professional rally racer, because there is not enough time or?


Just to be sure where you are aiming at: you are neither airline pilot nor professional rally racing driver. Correct?

And your aim is to go from flight school directly into very specialized pilot jobs like zero-G and/or aerobatics, while at the same time pursuing your racing driver career?


I do, but go karting. I devote a lot of time. Just wondering if it is possible to combine a career in racing and a pilot?
 
CRJockey
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Re: Занятость пилота Zero-G и другие вопросы о карьере пилота

Sat Dec 19, 2020 6:04 pm

AlexGarmins wrote:
CRJockey wrote:
AlexGarmins wrote:


Sorry, but you can get a little more detail. That is, an airplane pilot cannot become a professional rally racer, because there is not enough time or?


Just to be sure where you are aiming at: you are neither airline pilot nor professional rally racing driver. Correct?

And your aim is to go from flight school directly into very specialized pilot jobs like zero-G and/or aerobatics, while at the same time pursuing your racing driver career?


I do, but go karting. I devote a lot of time. Just wondering if it is possible to combine a career in racing and a pilot?


Not sure how old you are, Alex. But if you aren’t 8 years old and already pretty good in karting, chances are you won’t make a professional race driver career.

Good news: if you are anything below 45 it isn’t too late for a professional Cockpit career, but I wouldn’t bet neither on zero-G nor any other specialized flying job. But regional or low cost airlines right seat would be realistic, post Corona at least. At the moment not so much.
 
VSMUT
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Re: Regional Airlines

Sat Dec 19, 2020 6:12 pm

Every airline does it differently, and it is pretty often tied to how that airline operates. I know the Q400 drivers at Air Baltic had a horrible job where they worked their butts off during day and had minimum-rest overnights at hotels. OTOH, many other regionals can send their crews home every single day, saving on hotel accommodation.

Salary, depends on the type. If you invest enough time on it and play your cards right, in Europe the salary for an ATR pilot can easily surpass that of a 737 or A320 pilot. Too many pilots leave the type in search of a shiny jet, so ATR operators tend to be short on skilled experienced crews. Market and demand dictates that salaries follow accordingly.
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Regional Airlines

Sat Dec 19, 2020 6:30 pm

How to get “part time” in a company?
 
CRJockey
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Re: Regional Airlines

Sat Dec 19, 2020 6:34 pm

AlexGarmins wrote:
How to get “part time” in a company?


Mostly by starting full time and then, depending on country legislation use your right to part time employment or convince the employer it is a good idea to keep you even when working part time.
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Занятость пилота Zero-G и другие вопросы о карьере пилота

Sat Dec 19, 2020 6:39 pm

I started practicing at the age of 12. Now I also continue. I even have awards. The last question I wanted to ask. I just found out from a corporate aviation pilot who flies according to the “part time” schedule. I heard that there are pilots, in particular and more in the USA, who manage to combine pilot work and other areas. That is, a seaman or boatmaster with a contract, say, 10/10 weeks or 7/7 weeks can fly and work as a pilot in a free week for the weekend? I wonder if flight skills will be lost if the contract is 6 months after 6 months of rest. That is, you can use these six months or a week for flight operations? I apologize for such weird scheduling questions, but just curious to know. For example, in Russia this is not possible at all.
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Regional Airlines

Sat Dec 19, 2020 6:42 pm

CRJockey wrote:
AlexGarmins wrote:
How to get “part time” in a company?


Mostly by starting full time and then, depending on country legislation use your right to part time employment or convince the employer it is a good idea to keep you even when working part time.


The last question I wanted to ask. I just found out from a corporate aviation pilot who flies according to the “part time” schedule. I heard that there are pilots, in particular and more in the USA, who manage to combine pilot work and other areas. That is, a seaman or boatmaster with a contract, say, 10/10 weeks or 7/7 weeks can fly and work as a pilot in a free week for the weekend? I wonder if flight skills will be lost if the contract is 6 months after 6 months of rest. That is, you can use these six months or a week for flight operations? I apologize for such weird scheduling questions, but just curious to know. For example, in Russia this is not possible at all.
 
CRJockey
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Re: Employment as a pilot Zero-G and other questions about a pilot's career

Sat Dec 19, 2020 6:45 pm

Indeed weird and quite unrealistic expectation. No worries for asking though. But in North America and Europe the market is flooded with pilots who are not seeking weird work schedules to support their second life as race driver/seaman. So, long shot to persuade an employer of your quite peculiar needs.
 
CRJockey
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Re: Regional Airlines

Sat Dec 19, 2020 6:47 pm

AlexGarmins wrote:
CRJockey wrote:
AlexGarmins wrote:
How to get “part time” in a company?


Mostly by starting full time and then, depending on country legislation use your right to part time employment or convince the employer it is a good idea to keep you even when working part time.


The last question I wanted to ask. I just found out from a corporate aviation pilot who flies according to the “part time” schedule. I heard that there are pilots, in particular and more in the USA, who manage to combine pilot work and other areas. That is, a seaman or boatmaster with a contract, say, 10/10 weeks or 7/7 weeks can fly and work as a pilot in a free week for the weekend? I wonder if flight skills will be lost if the contract is 6 months after 6 months of rest. That is, you can use these six months or a week for flight operations? I apologize for such weird scheduling questions, but just curious to know. For example, in Russia this is not possible at all.


Just gave you a reply in the other thread. Please don’t open similar threads and ask the same questions in different topics. That annoys and is probably forbidden by forum rules, as most fun things are.
 
Woodreau
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Re: Employment as a pilot Zero-G and other questions about a pilot's career

Sat Dec 19, 2020 9:03 pm

If you’re trying to do this in the United States, you will need to figure out how to maintain your currency requirements of 3 landings in 90 days. If you don’t have the 3 landings, you’ll need some sort of requalification to accomplish.

Having lots of money available or being independently wealthy makes anything is possible.

as I get towards the end of this career, I can see myself dropping my flight schedule to one 3 or 4-day trip a month. taking 27-28 days off every month to go sailing or backpacking or cross-country glider trip or whatever else I want to do.
 
GalaxyFlyer
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Re: Занятость пилота Zero-G и другие вопросы о карьере пилота

Sat Dec 19, 2020 9:27 pm

AlexGarmins wrote:
I started practicing at the age of 12. Now I also continue. I even have awards. The last question I wanted to ask. I just found out from a corporate aviation pilot who flies according to the “part time” schedule. I heard that there are pilots, in particular and more in the USA, who manage to combine pilot work and other areas. That is, a seaman or boatmaster with a contract, say, 10/10 weeks or 7/7 weeks can fly and work as a pilot in a free week for the weekend? I wonder if flight skills will be lost if the contract is 6 months after 6 months of rest. That is, you can use these six months or a week for flight operations? I apologize for such weird scheduling questions, but just curious to know. For example, in Russia this is not possible at all.


You won’t find a schedule with months on and months off very often. You need to understand flight/duty rules, how they apply to outside work from aviation in your regulatory body. Normally, non-commercial flying doesn’t apply, nor does outside hobbies like racing go-karts. Regulators differ, as do employers.
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Региональные авиалинии

Sat Dec 19, 2020 9:48 pm

Do float amphibious aircraft have the exact same operating mode as local or charter airlines? Or is it all individual? And then I saw how in the Maldives or Florida everyone flies. And do helicopter pilots have a similar schedule as planes?

and how to get the type rating for a helicopter? When should I get it for a helicopter type? What is the price?
 
AlexGarmins
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Aircraft amphibian and helicopters carrier

Sat Dec 19, 2020 10:32 pm

Do float amphibious aircraft have the exact same operating mode as local or charter airlines? Or is it all individual? And then I saw how in the Maldives or Florida everyone flies. And do helicopter pilots have a similar schedule as planes?

and how to get the type rating for a helicopter? When should I get it for a helicopter type? What is the price
 
AlexGarmins
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Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2020 8:08 am

Rescue service or work in the country's authorities as a pilot

Sat Dec 19, 2020 11:35 pm

What are the prospects for becoming a police helicopter pilot or getting on a firefighter or rescue transport plane? Are there specific requirements and frameworks for becoming a pilot in such areas? Do you need to have a military pilot's education or is an aviation school enough? Help me choose a sphere. And what are the opening hours as opposed to airlines and charters? What is the operating mode of the rescue helicopter or police helicopter? Necessary to find out. Is there a "part time", if anything, to combine work.
 
GalaxyFlyer
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Re: Regional Airlines

Sun Dec 20, 2020 12:01 am

Maldives are very unique, there’s a tourist season, so most of the flying is then, but a smaller year round group. It was flown by Canadians from Borek, not sure nowadays. What do you mean by “individual” or “operating mode”? It’s a flying job with the operator schedulers setting schedules according to contract or company policy.
 
AlexGarmins
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Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2020 8:08 am

Re: Региональные авиалинии

Sun Dec 20, 2020 12:17 am

You don’t think, if anything, that I’m some kind of crazy person :) I’m just at the stage of training and, of course, I wanted to learn more about the types of work as a pilot and the whole structure in order to understand where to go. I hope these questions will be final. What are the prospects of becoming a police helicopter pilot or getting on a firefighter or rescue transport plane? Are there specific requirements and frameworks for becoming a police / rescue helicopter pilot or rescue / firefighter aircraft pilot? What education do you need to have as a military pilot or is an aviation school enough? And what are the opening hours as opposed to airlines and charters? What is the operating mode of the rescue helicopter or police helicopter? Need to find out. Is there "partially", if anything, to combine work. I just want to understand. And how interesting.
 
GalaxyFlyer
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Re: Regional Airlines

Sun Dec 20, 2020 1:11 am

What nationality are you and country you live in? That’s critical to giving out guidance.
 
mxaxai
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Re: Aircraft amphibian and helicopters carrier

Sun Dec 20, 2020 1:24 am

AlexGarmins wrote:
Do float amphibious aircraft have the exact same operating mode as local or charter airlines? Or is it all individual? And then I saw how in the Maldives or Florida everyone flies.

Yes. Some floatplanes (or amphibious) do scheduled flights like regular airliners (e. g. many in the Maledives or in Vancouver). Some flights are charters. Some smaller floatplanes are owned by individual people like other general aviation aircraft.
AlexGarmins wrote:
And do helicopter pilots have a similar schedule as planes?

Scheduled helicopter operations are very rare. The primary benefit of a helicopter is to fly anywhere anytime; having a fixed schedule ruins that aspect.
AlexGarmins wrote:
and how to get the type rating for a helicopter? When should I get it for a helicopter type? What is the price

Helicopter pilot licenses are usually different from fixed-wing pilot licenses. So you can't just get a type rating before going through the basic training.
 
orlandocfi
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Re: Rescue service or work in the country's authorities as a pilot

Sun Dec 20, 2020 1:40 am

Police and air ambulance helicopter jobs in the US tend to be “who you know” kind of jobs that are obtained by making connections in their arena.
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: Региональные авиалинии

Sun Dec 20, 2020 1:55 am

AlexGarmins wrote:
You don’t think, if anything, that I’m some kind of crazy person :) I’m just at the stage of training and, of course, I wanted to learn more about the types of work as a pilot and the whole structure in order to understand where to go. I hope these questions will be final. What are the prospects of becoming a police helicopter pilot or getting on a firefighter or rescue transport plane? Are there specific requirements and frameworks for becoming a police / rescue helicopter pilot or rescue / firefighter aircraft pilot? What education do you need to have as a military pilot or is an aviation school enough? And what are the opening hours as opposed to airlines and charters? What is the operating mode of the rescue helicopter or police helicopter? Need to find out. Is there "partially", if anything, to combine work. I just want to understand. And how interesting.


A lot of that information is publicly available on military and police websites. I'll echo GalaxyFlyer in asking your nationality. Different places have very different prospects.

You're getting way ahead of yourself. The first step is getting any flying job. Take whatever is on offer. Only once you start working will you really be able to figure out where you want to go, and what opportunities are potentially open for you. Work hard so you can get that first job, and then work hard on that job so you can eventually move on to something more attractive.

You can't expect to get a flying job with a decent lifestyle without first having had one or several flying jobs with less than ideal lifestyles. Expect sleepless nights, merciless schedules, working on weekends and holidays, living far away from where you want, and low pay at the very least. Once you've proven that live like that, while building experience in challenging conditions and still maintaining a positive attitude, and working hard, will you be considered for the nicer jobs.

As mentioned in the other thread, many people combine aviation with other professions. But getting into aviation is initially very much a full-time occupation. Take time off when you can but don't expect it to be on your terms. Junior pilots never get the days off they want until they become senior pilots.

Part-time flying jobs, as mentioned, are typically only available if you first work full time first. There are many variants. Month on month off; 20 days on 10 off, three weeks on two off, just to name a few.
 
mxaxai
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Re: Rescue service or work in the country's authorities as a pilot

Sun Dec 20, 2020 2:14 am

For the USA:
https://www.flyingmag.com/how-to-become ... t-officer/
What are the requirements for becoming an ALE officer?

Most [US] departments require ALE crew members be sworn police officers, and many mandate a minimum amount of prior ground patrol time; three to five years is common. Community and four-year colleges, and privately run police academies offer law enforcement programs that provide certification within a state, opening the door to employment. “Any aviation experience helps when being selected,” says Schwarzbach. Outside the U.S., ALE pilots are usually civilian employees.

What are the flight qualification requirements?

ALE units operate under public-use rules, exempt from most FAA aircraft and pilot regulations, but the majority adheres to accreditation standards developed under ALEA auspices, which require pilots have at least a commercial license for the category of aircraft they operate. Some units require ALE candidates to have at least a private pilot’s certificate; others will “take a police officers from the street, train them as tactical flight officers first, and then put them into pilot training,” says Schwarzbach. Such training programs typically require a three- to five-year service commitment from those accepted.


In the UK:
https://npas.police.uk/jobs/line-pilot-helicopter
What you need to be considered for the role:
• Minimum of a Commercial Pilot’s Licence (Helicopter) with RT Licence and Class 1 Medical (unrestricted)

• A minimum of 1,500 hours total helicopter flying time which must include 50 hours flying at night including 20 hours PIC at night, 500 hours PIC overland under VMC and significant low flying experience. You will also need to demonstrate instrument flying experience.

• Ability to work as part of a team and be a self-starter

• Ability to communicate clearly and concisely to the crew while carrying out other tasks

• A full UK driving licence


Air ambulances are usually civilian operators that work like any other helicopter charter company.
 
VSMUT
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Re: Airbus-300 Zero-G

Sun Dec 20, 2020 3:37 am

AlexGarmins wrote:
How to become a pilot of a flying space laboratory like the Airbus 300 Zero-G? What is their work schedule? And what do you need to have for employment?


AlexGarmins wrote:
1. How to become a pilot for a flying space laboratory like the Airbus 300 Zero-G or B727 Zero-g What is their work schedule? And what do you need to have for employment? Do you need to be a military pilot for this, or is it enough to become a civilian pilot and then try to get a job?



You apply for the job like any other. I saw that they were looking for applicants some years back. Requirements are sky high if you were wondering. The sort of experience you only gain after a decade or two of full time flying, and probably with a lot of specialized training and ratings on the side.
 
GalaxyFlyer
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Re: Regional Airlines

Sun Dec 20, 2020 4:33 am

There were a time long ago and far away where young men with the sky in their hearts could bicycle or drive down to the local airport. There they could listen to WW II pilots talk about cimbat or flying C-47s, airline pilots brag about exotic trips to Hawaii or Paris. Wide-eyed, they would listen and learn about bidding, ALPA union rules, about wrestling a 707 in a heavy crosswind. The old heads would chastise about doing things the right way, about applying pressures on the controls with fingertips, talk about weather and acro.

If you were a good listener and worked hard as a line boy, washing the trainers, taking care of visitors, sweeping hangar floors, being a general gopher; you might get a ride in the UAL pilot’s PT-22 and actually loop a plane. Gradually, saving up your wages you gained the hours and ratings plus the immense knowledge these pilots gave for free. I learned more about being a pilot sipping a Coke on sunny afternoon in ragged set of overalls than ever did from some of my instructors.

Most of my flying jobs, I was referred to by friends, a casual mention, “you’d work out for us” kind of thing. One, the wing commander heard of me asked me to join. The civilian job involved an old friend who asked if I was interested in moving on. That’s mostly how aviation works—networking while building your reputation for good work and dedication.
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Спасательная служба или работа в органах власти страны в качестве пилота

Sun Dec 20, 2020 11:45 am

And what about the work schedule? Are there any differences in government structures from civil aviation?
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Спасательная служба или работа в органах власти страны в качестве пилота

Sun Dec 20, 2020 11:50 am

1.And what about the work schedule? Are there any differences in Zero-G from civil aviation? After all, they do not fly so often. That is, such pilots usually fly on call and work in parallel for other airlines?

2. I heard that in the USSR Soviet pilots could become test pilots, having initially worked as sports pilots in DOSAAF. In other countries, the pilot of a sports plane cannot apply for testers?
 
VSMUT
Posts: 5497
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 11:40 am

Re: Спасательная служба или работа в органах власти страны в качестве пилота

Sun Dec 20, 2020 12:12 pm

AlexGarmins wrote:
1.And what about the work schedule? Are there any differences in Zero-G from civil aviation? After all, they do not fly so often. That is, such pilots usually fly on call and work in parallel for other airlines?


They fly more often than you think, there are only have 5 of them. 1 is the flight test director for ATR. Another is also an ATR test pilot. The other 3 are military pilots who also fly the A310s of the AdlA. As you can probably deduct, it's pretty hard to comply with the minimum requirements for that job.


AlexGarmins wrote:
2. I heard that in the USSR Soviet pilots could become test pilots, having initially worked as sports pilots in DOSAAF. In other countries, the pilot of a sports plane cannot apply for testers?


I seriously doubt that will happen.

Since you keep asking: All the interesting jobs in aviation require bucket loads of experience and skill. You won't get one of those jobs unless you invest a lot of time in making flying a full-time career, starting with a "menial" job as a lowly paid and overworked first officer at a low cost carrier or regional airline.
 
AlexGarmins
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Re: Спасательная служба или работа в органах власти страны в качестве пилота

Sun Dec 20, 2020 12:19 pm

But it seems that in the USSR a pilot-athlete with DOSAAF, most likely, needed to have a "crust" of engineering education in order to enter the SPT (school of test pilots).
 
shamrock137
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Re: Спасательная служба или работа в органах власти страны в качестве пилота

Sun Dec 20, 2020 12:20 pm

AlexGarmins wrote:
And what about the work schedule? Are there any differences in government structures from civil aviation?


There are differences in the schedule, however its not civil vs government, its really more driven by the type of flying you're doing. Plus, in the US at least, these type of jobs aren't always run by the government. For example, many air ambulance services are run by private companies who work on contract with hospitals. The main differences in schedule would be that these are more "day" jobs than compared to an airline pilot. As an airline pilot, you'll typically start flying from your base, fly 2-4 days, then your last leg will take you back to your base. You stay in hotels during that time in different cities. An air ambulance pilot would typically work a shift, say 0600-1400, but you always end up back at your home base. During that time you might fly 2-3 flights, example would be fly from base to a car accident, pick up a patient, transport them to a hospital, then return to base. Then fly from base to a hospital, pick up a patient, and fly them to a different hospital, then return to base. once your shift is over at 1400, the next crew comes in and you go home, then return the next day at 0600.
 
AlexGarmins
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2020 8:08 am

Re: Спасательная служба или работа в качестве пилота в органах власти страны

Sun Dec 20, 2020 1:34 pm

Aerobatics Experience in Advanced + Aviation Education —-> Can I Become a Tester in Other Countries? Or are there only sports or small planes?
 
AlexGarmins
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2020 8:08 am

Re: Спасательная служба или работа в качестве пилота в органах власти страны

Sun Dec 20, 2020 1:36 pm

By the way, does a tester in Europe and the USA need to have an engineering or aerospace education? and the Air Force teaches engineering disciplines?
 
AlexGarmins
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2020 8:08 am

Re: Обучение летчиков-испытателей

Sun Dec 20, 2020 1:50 pm

GalaxyFlyer wrote:
The military schools require being in a flying service of a military. NTPS, USAF TPS and ETPS all exchange students, so a Brit or Canadian might go to Pax River or an American or Swiss to ETPS. My brother’s NTPS had about 20% allied students including a Swiss officer. The National civilian
TPS is a tuition-based school. None of the military schools train for civil type ratings.


Have there been cases when with PPL, CPL became testers? Was it possible to graduate from the aviation school and enter the testers? If possible, get, if necessary, an aviation education. And you need a certain experience of work and flights, flight hours?

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