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Re: Why did Airbus switch to winglets so late in the A320

Posted: Sun Feb 28, 2021 10:31 am
by WIederling
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
Richard Whitcomb designed them and Learjet 28 “Longhorn” in 1977 was the first to fly. BAE was later

https://www.jstor.org/stable/44699039?seq=1


[email protected] seems to have "reinvented" quite a lot, right? :-)

von Hoerner, some others worked ahead of Whitcomb afaik.
( Theoretical understanding of area rule, remedial shock bodies started in WWII.)

Re: Why did Airbus switch to winglets so late in the A320

Posted: Sun Feb 28, 2021 1:06 pm
by 747classic
WIederling wrote:
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
Richard Whitcomb designed them and Learjet 28 “Longhorn” in 1977 was the first to fly. BAE was later

https://www.jstor.org/stable/44699039?seq=1


[email protected] seems to have "reinvented" quite a lot, right? :-)

von Hoerner, some others worked ahead of Whitcomb afaik.
( Theoretical understanding of area rule, remedial shock bodies started in WWII.)


Correct :checkmark:

Wingtip devices are designed earlier (1941?) and are intended to improve the efficiency of fixed-wing aircraft by reducing drag. Although there are several types of wing tip devices which function in different manners, their intended effect is always to reduce an aircraft's drag by partial recovery of the tip vortex energy.

However in this thread we are discussing the "blended winglet" versus "sharklet" case.

Re: Why did Airbus switch to winglets so late in the A320

Posted: Sun Feb 28, 2021 1:18 pm
by GalaxyFlyer
WIederling wrote:
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
Richard Whitcomb designed them and Learjet 28 “Longhorn” in 1977 was the first to fly. BAE was later

https://www.jstor.org/stable/44699039?seq=1


[email protected] seems to have "reinvented" quite a lot, right? :-)

von Hoerner, some others worked ahead of Whitcomb afaik.
( Theoretical understanding of area rule, remedial shock bodies started in WWII.)


True enough, but then why weren’t they used earlier than the Learjet application. We didn’t winglets on, say, the Trident or the 727, 737 until long after the WW II experiments. If there had been an application on a German or European jet airliner design, I haven’t seen it.

Re: Why did Airbus switch to winglets so late in the A320

Posted: Sun Feb 28, 2021 3:45 pm
by WIederling
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
WIederling wrote:
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
Richard Whitcomb designed them and Learjet 28 “Longhorn” in 1977 was the first to fly. BAE was later

https://www.jstor.org/stable/44699039?seq=1


[email protected] seems to have "reinvented" quite a lot, right? :-)

von Hoerner, some others worked ahead of Whitcomb afaik.
( Theoretical understanding of area rule, remedial shock bodies started in WWII.)


True enough, but then why weren’t they used earlier than the Learjet application. We didn’t winglets on, say, the Trident or the 727, 737 until long after the WW II experiments. If there had been an application on a German or European jet airliner design, I haven’t seen it.


basic idea was floated around/before WWI ?
Then
fuel was cheap ( we had box carriers with gas turbine propulsion (gen3) that cruised faster ( 27..30kn ) than most warships :-) .
more happened in the glider domain. academics and smallish commercial.

For gliders anything that reduces drag is welcome.

I'd like to see a comparison of the various types versus the window of usefulness.
Argument I seem to remember was that winglets, fences, endplates, ... each peak ( or have wider scope of usefulnes ) in different segments of flight regime.
Even between B winglets ( how brilliant to homestead a generic term ) and A sharklets seem to exist differences in profiling though the basic shape seems to be first blush similar.

Another interesting domain is belly fairings. ( historic evolution but also solutions like the recently available SHARP modification for better short field performance on A320. Look ma, no moving parts :-)