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yyzmdw
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NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 8:40 am

I’ve always found this route to be so interesting because it’s so highly served and sees such a wide array of airframes. I’m interested in how different airlines have prioritized different parts of their fleets for this relatively short hop. BA is going to make this exclusively 772s starting this summer (I imagine post pandemic we’ll see some larger metal - 77W and eventually the 779) whereas VS has opted for the much newer and larger but more expensive 35K. Thoughts on the economics of operating a more efficient vs older/amortized type on a relatively short route and saving your more efficient metal for longer stuff? I know that’s how UPS for example is utilizing their new 748s — that way they get higher utilization. Is the A35K/789 fuel burn advantage that much on such a small hop over a 77E/77A?
 
Fuling
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 9:29 am

Frequency of services comes into play a bit here too. BA would rather have more flights spaced out throughout the day, rather than just 2 or 3 per day. So the smaller aircraft makes a bit more sense in that case. Having more also helps with slot management for winter operations too.
 
TC957
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 9:42 am

London - NY won't see the volume of passenger business traffic for many years yet, compared to pre-Covid. But it's good for cargo hence VS using A350's.
 
MIflyer12
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 10:15 am

IMHO the OP is coming at this the wrong way. Aircraft are expensive, long-lived assets. Carriers do not have infinite flexibility, possessing 30 777s and 50 35Ks today and 10 777s and 70 35Ks tomorrow. Aircraft assignment isn't solely a question of what's best for a single route, but what makes best use of the fleet. It's not just fuel burn but hours utilized (see some weird W-routes) and crew availability (because crew are expensive and inflexible in retraining for another type). Given the number of BA's long-haul airport pairs, optimizing is a non-trivial task.
 
ContinentalEWR
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Joined: Wed May 24, 2000 2:50 am

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 11:49 am

Pre-pandemic, NYC-LON was all about frequency, and the need to serve the market with frequency is why the aircraft types have fluctuated over time (and even across each airline's schedule) though there are some nuances for each of the big players in the market. The route is the largest, most profitable, and most prestigious O&D/P2P route in the world, and pre-pandemic generated $1BN a year in pre-tax revenue. It will take a while for the market to recover along with the rest of the industry. NYC-LON also carries a lot of cargo which is why larger aircraft are often used.

DL/VS - Delta pre-pandemic settled around the A330 for the route, to try and match the VS premium product offering, as DL's paled in comparison. VS has flown everything from the 747-400, A340-600, A340-300, A330-300, 787, and A350.

AA/BA - BA, pre pandemic was mainly 747-400 on JFK-LHR. It is now using the 777-200ER. AA settled around the 772/77W a while ago, but before that it was 777, 767, A300, MD11, and 747SPs stretching back earlier in its operation.

CO to LGW, was operating one 767-400 and one 777. When it switched to LHR it retained the same format. As frequencies were added, 757s were also used. UA kept the 757s for a while, mixing in the 764, 763 and it pre-pandemic was settling around a high J format 763. It is now flown with the 787-10 once a day.

Because frequency is king in this market, the A380 hasn't been used and likely, never will be. The 747's at BA were retrofitted to a larger J cabin, smaller Y, and used for hauling cargo.
 
ContinentalEWR
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Joined: Wed May 24, 2000 2:50 am

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 11:57 am

MIflyer12 wrote:
IMHO the OP is coming at this the wrong way. Aircraft are expensive, long-lived assets. Carriers do not have infinite flexibility, possessing 30 777s and 50 35Ks today and 10 777s and 70 35Ks tomorrow. Aircraft assignment isn't solely a question of what's best for a single route, but what makes best use of the fleet. It's not just fuel burn but hours utilized (see some weird W-routes) and crew availability (because crew are expensive and inflexible in retraining for another type). Given the number of BA's long-haul airport pairs, optimizing is a non-trivial task.


Yes. And the NYC-LON-NYC sector is relatively short, so it allows for turnarounds on either end across different routes, including even longer ones.
 
airbazar
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 12:08 pm

Comparing BA with VS is like comparing apples and oranges. One is a huge airline the other is a smallish, niche airline. You're never going to get the same behavior out both, no matter what route you are looking at.
 
ContinentalEWR
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 12:12 pm

airbazar wrote:
Comparing BA with VS is like comparing apples and oranges. One is a huge airline the other is a smallish, niche airline. You're never going to get the same behavior out both, no matter what route you are looking at.


That makes no sense in a market like this and the way it is served. VS is smaller (by a lot) than BA, but combined with DL, is a major player in the market and has an all wide body fleet anyway so what's the point really? BA, pre-pandemic likely isolated the 747s it was using to the market, yes, while VS rotated planes more frequently, but size of airline for the point the OP is making is a little irrelevant.
 
RvA
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 12:26 pm

ContinentalEWR wrote:
Pre-pandemic, NYC-LON was all about frequency, and the need to serve the market with frequency is why the aircraft types have fluctuated over time (and even across each airline's schedule) though there are some nuances for each of the big players in the market. The route is the largest, most profitable, and most prestigious O&D/P2P route in the world, and pre-pandemic generated $1BN a year in pre-tax revenue. It will take a while for the market to recover along with the rest of the industry. NYC-LON also carries a lot of cargo which is why larger aircraft are often used.

DL/VS - Delta pre-pandemic settled around the A330 for the route, to try and match the VS premium product offering, as DL's paled in comparison. VS has flown everything from the 747-400, A340-600, A340-300, A330-300, 787, and A350.

AA/BA - BA, pre pandemic was mainly 747-400 on JFK-LHR. It is now using the 777-200ER. AA settled around the 772/77W a while ago, but before that it was 777, 767, A300, MD11, and 747SPs stretching back earlier in its operation.

CO to LGW, was operating one 767-400 and one 777. When it switched to LHR it retained the same format. As frequencies were added, 757s were also used. UA kept the 757s for a while, mixing in the 764, 763 and it pre-pandemic was settling around a high J format 763. It is now flown with the 787-10 once a day.

Because frequency is king in this market, the A380 hasn't been used and likely, never will be. The 747's at BA were retrofitted to a larger J cabin, smaller Y, and used for hauling cargo.


$1bn a year for BA alone was it not?
Would this route ever come back to the pre Covid and pre Brexit levels? I’m guessing in terms of business and first class seats offered maybe not at all within the next 10 years?
 
Boeing74741R
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 12:35 pm

ContinentalEWR wrote:
Pre-pandemic, NYC-LON was all about frequency, and the need to serve the market with frequency is why the aircraft types have fluctuated over time (and even across each airline's schedule) though there are some nuances for each of the big players in the market. The route is the largest, most profitable, and most prestigious O&D/P2P route in the world, and pre-pandemic generated $1BN a year in pre-tax revenue. It will take a while for the market to recover along with the rest of the industry. NYC-LON also carries a lot of cargo which is why larger aircraft are often used.

DL/VS - Delta pre-pandemic settled around the A330 for the route, to try and match the VS premium product offering, as DL's paled in comparison. VS has flown everything from the 747-400, A340-600, A340-300, A330-300, 787, and A350.

AA/BA - BA, pre pandemic was mainly 747-400 on JFK-LHR. It is now using the 777-200ER. AA settled around the 772/77W a while ago, but before that it was 777, 767, A300, MD11, and 747SPs stretching back earlier in its operation.

CO to LGW, was operating one 767-400 and one 777. When it switched to LHR it retained the same format. As frequencies were added, 757s were also used. UA kept the 757s for a while, mixing in the 764, 763 and it pre-pandemic was settling around a high J format 763. It is now flown with the 787-10 once a day.

Because frequency is king in this market, the A380 hasn't been used and likely, never will be. The 747's at BA were retrofitted to a larger J cabin, smaller Y, and used for hauling cargo.


Another factor why the A380 hasn't been used on London-New York flights is T7 at JFK reportedly can't accommodate it.

It's also worth remembering the BA 747's used to JFK were the Super Hi-J-config examples.
 
micstatic
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 12:43 pm

I'm very curious. this route has always been the mythical most profitable route on a.net. (Followed by JFK-LAX). But is it just the highest revenue flight, or is it actually the most profitable. My theory is that some much less glamourous flights are the most profitable. IE, city pairs with very limited service where the airline gets it's pound of flesh.
 
airbazar
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 1:06 pm

ContinentalEWR wrote:
airbazar wrote:
Comparing BA with VS is like comparing apples and oranges. One is a huge airline the other is a smallish, niche airline. You're never going to get the same behavior out both, no matter what route you are looking at.


That makes no sense in a market like this and the way it is served. VS is smaller (by a lot) than BA, but combined with DL, is a major player in the market and has an all wide body fleet anyway so what's the point really? BA, pre-pandemic likely isolated the 747s it was using to the market, yes, while VS rotated planes more frequently, but size of airline for the point the OP is making is a little irrelevant.


It's very much relevant. What is the point? First, the route doesn't operate in a vacuum. Second, all widebody or not it doesn't change the fact that they can't offer many connections beyond LHR so it would be ludicrous for them to offer the same amount of seats as BA, let alone the same number of frequencies. All of this applies not just to JFK but to every city in N.America. At one point in recent past BA had 4 daily frequencies out of BOS while VS had only 1 (ONE). So I'll say it again, comparing BA with VS is like comparing apples and oranges.
 
dmstorm22
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 1:28 pm

micstatic wrote:
I'm very curious. this route has always been the mythical most profitable route on a.net. (Followed by JFK-LAX). But is it just the highest revenue flight, or is it actually the most profitable. My theory is that some much less glamourous flights are the most profitable. IE, city pairs with very limited service where the airline gets it's pound of flesh.


In terms of profit margin you're probably right. In total profit NYC-LON combines high frequency, fairly high volume (per flight), and high profit. J tickets between NYC-LON are at a premium compared to a normal International J route. Even W or Y tickets are generally more expensive than other European destinations.

Combine those factors and the route was a perfect recipe in a pre-pandemic world to be a high-volume profit machine.
 
panamair
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 1:42 pm

ContinentalEWR wrote:

DL/VS - Delta pre-pandemic settled around the A330 for the route, to try and match the VS premium product offering, as DL's paled in comparison. VS has flown everything from the 747-400, A340-600, A340-300, A330-300, 787, and A350.


FYI, Delta was in the process of transitioning to the refurbished 764 from the A330s for LHR pre-pandemic already. The 764 seating capacity is more in line with the A330-200 and is smaller gauge than anything VS operates. All the Delta-operated S21 LHR flights are loaded as 764s currently.
 
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flyingclrs727
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:20 pm

yyzmdw wrote:
I’ve always found this route to be so interesting because it’s so highly served and sees such a wide array of airframes. I’m interested in how different airlines have prioritized different parts of their fleets for this relatively short hop. BA is going to make this exclusively 772s starting this summer (I imagine post pandemic we’ll see some larger metal - 77W and eventually the 779) whereas VS has opted for the much newer and larger but more expensive 35K. Thoughts on the economics of operating a more efficient vs older/amortized type on a relatively short route and saving your more efficient metal for longer stuff? I know that’s how UPS for example is utilizing their new 748s — that way they get higher utilization. Is the A35K/789 fuel burn advantage that much on such a small hop over a 77E/77A?


The NYC-LON market is not a typical transatlantic market. First, New York City is the largest city in the US, and London is the largest city in Europe. Both cities are the largest financial hubs in their respective continents, and are world financial centers. There is lots of O&D travel between them. As far as distance goes, it is a short transoceanic flight at just under 8 hours. The cities are just 5 time zones apart. This means there are lots of suitable takeoff and landing slots that make sense between them that aren't restricted by curfews at either or both ends. There is lots of business demand between the two cities that isn't restricted to just one or two travel time windows. People want to fly at many times per day. The airlines act accordingly. Instead of having a few A380's and filling them up for a round trip every day, they put smaller widebodies on the route and schedule them throughout the day.

It's sort of the transatlantic version of the Dallas-Houston market. At one time Southwest had a flight between those cities every 30 minutes throughout the day. Businessmen didn't even need to bother buying tickets in advance. They knew that if the next flight was filled, the next after that would be available.
 
ContinentalEWR
Posts: 4656
Joined: Wed May 24, 2000 2:50 am

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:29 pm

RvA wrote:
ContinentalEWR wrote:
Pre-pandemic, NYC-LON was all about frequency, and the need to serve the market with frequency is why the aircraft types have fluctuated over time (and even across each airline's schedule) though there are some nuances for each of the big players in the market. The route is the largest, most profitable, and most prestigious O&D/P2P route in the world, and pre-pandemic generated $1BN a year in pre-tax revenue. It will take a while for the market to recover along with the rest of the industry. NYC-LON also carries a lot of cargo which is why larger aircraft are often used.

DL/VS - Delta pre-pandemic settled around the A330 for the route, to try and match the VS premium product offering, as DL's paled in comparison. VS has flown everything from the 747-400, A340-600, A340-300, A330-300, 787, and A350.

AA/BA - BA, pre pandemic was mainly 747-400 on JFK-LHR. It is now using the 777-200ER. AA settled around the 772/77W a while ago, but before that it was 777, 767, A300, MD11, and 747SPs stretching back earlier in its operation.

CO to LGW, was operating one 767-400 and one 777. When it switched to LHR it retained the same format. As frequencies were added, 757s were also used. UA kept the 757s for a while, mixing in the 764, 763 and it pre-pandemic was settling around a high J format 763. It is now flown with the 787-10 once a day.

Because frequency is king in this market, the A380 hasn't been used and likely, never will be. The 747's at BA were retrofitted to a larger J cabin, smaller Y, and used for hauling cargo.


$1bn a year for BA alone was it not?
Would this route ever come back to the pre Covid and pre Brexit levels? I’m guessing in terms of business and first class seats offered maybe not at all within the next 10 years?


Yes, $1BN shared between BA and AA. I agree, it will not be the near-shuttle it was before COVID and Brexit but it will rebound when it can.
 
ContinentalEWR
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:31 pm

panamair wrote:
ContinentalEWR wrote:

DL/VS - Delta pre-pandemic settled around the A330 for the route, to try and match the VS premium product offering, as DL's paled in comparison. VS has flown everything from the 747-400, A340-600, A340-300, A330-300, 787, and A350.


FYI, Delta was in the process of transitioning to the refurbished 764 from the A330s for LHR pre-pandemic already. The 764 seating capacity is more in line with the A330-200 and is smaller gauge than anything VS operates. All the Delta-operated S21 LHR flights are loaded as 764s currently.


FYI Delta originally pulled the 767-400 off LHR from JFK because it had a dated cabin and had not been refurbished. These birds now sport the upgraded Delta One cabin with suites and that's why they are transitioning back to the LHR route. The A330-200 was used on JFK-LHR when the 767-300ER/400ERs were pulled off the market.
 
ContinentalEWR
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Joined: Wed May 24, 2000 2:50 am

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:31 pm

airbazar wrote:
ContinentalEWR wrote:
airbazar wrote:
Comparing BA with VS is like comparing apples and oranges. One is a huge airline the other is a smallish, niche airline. You're never going to get the same behavior out both, no matter what route you are looking at.


That makes no sense in a market like this and the way it is served. VS is smaller (by a lot) than BA, but combined with DL, is a major player in the market and has an all wide body fleet anyway so what's the point really? BA, pre-pandemic likely isolated the 747s it was using to the market, yes, while VS rotated planes more frequently, but size of airline for the point the OP is making is a little irrelevant.


It's very much relevant. What is the point? First, the route doesn't operate in a vacuum. Second, all widebody or not it doesn't change the fact that they can't offer many connections beyond LHR so it would be ludicrous for them to offer the same amount of seats as BA, let alone the same number of frequencies. All of this applies not just to JFK but to every city in N.America. At one point in recent past BA had 4 daily frequencies out of BOS while VS had only 1 (ONE). So I'll say it again, comparing BA with VS is like comparing apples and oranges.


Suit yourself. I don't think anyone here is really interested in a BA vs. VS argument.
Last edited by ContinentalEWR on Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
sevenair
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Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:32 pm

Possibly. But, due to brexit the UK is excelling, along with the USA on vaccines and could likely be open to traffic before any EU member states following the EU's catastrophic vaccine rollout.
 
ContinentalEWR
Posts: 4656
Joined: Wed May 24, 2000 2:50 am

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:33 pm

Boeing74741R wrote:
ContinentalEWR wrote:
Pre-pandemic, NYC-LON was all about frequency, and the need to serve the market with frequency is why the aircraft types have fluctuated over time (and even across each airline's schedule) though there are some nuances for each of the big players in the market. The route is the largest, most profitable, and most prestigious O&D/P2P route in the world, and pre-pandemic generated $1BN a year in pre-tax revenue. It will take a while for the market to recover along with the rest of the industry. NYC-LON also carries a lot of cargo which is why larger aircraft are often used.

DL/VS - Delta pre-pandemic settled around the A330 for the route, to try and match the VS premium product offering, as DL's paled in comparison. VS has flown everything from the 747-400, A340-600, A340-300, A330-300, 787, and A350.

AA/BA - BA, pre pandemic was mainly 747-400 on JFK-LHR. It is now using the 777-200ER. AA settled around the 772/77W a while ago, but before that it was 777, 767, A300, MD11, and 747SPs stretching back earlier in its operation.

CO to LGW, was operating one 767-400 and one 777. When it switched to LHR it retained the same format. As frequencies were added, 757s were also used. UA kept the 757s for a while, mixing in the 764, 763 and it pre-pandemic was settling around a high J format 763. It is now flown with the 787-10 once a day.

Because frequency is king in this market, the A380 hasn't been used and likely, never will be. The 747's at BA were retrofitted to a larger J cabin, smaller Y, and used for hauling cargo.


Another factor why the A380 hasn't been used on London-New York flights is T7 at JFK reportedly can't accommodate it.

It's also worth remembering the BA 747's used to JFK were the Super Hi-J-config examples.


Yes, that's true, T7 is not A380 capable as far as I know, and now won't be as it will close in 2022 and be torn down. T8, where BA is moving to, is also not A380 ready though I am not sure if the 5-6 new gates will be. At this point, the A380 is being phased out from most fleets (not at BA, for now) so large investments in infrastructure to accommodate it are not worth the spend. I mentioned the 747's BA was using to JFK were the high J configuration.
 
JibberJim
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Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2016 1:33 pm

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:42 pm

dmstorm22 wrote:
Even W or Y tickets are generally more expensive than other European destinations.


Isn't that only because of the high UK APD rather than the actual ticket portion the airline sees? I always found NYC tickets super cheap 'cos of the sheer number of Y seats on the market supporting the J frequencies.
 
Weatherwatcher1
Posts: 891
Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2019 5:14 pm

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 3:09 pm

yyzmdw wrote:
Thoughts on the economics of operating a more efficient vs older/amortized type on a relatively short route and saving your more efficient metal for longer stuff? I know that’s how UPS for example is utilizing their new 748s — that way they get higher utilization. Is the A35K/789 fuel burn advantage that much on such a small hop over a 77E/77A?


The 777-200 is older and with a similar configuration probably has higher CASM than the A350-1000. For BA JFK-LHR is one of their shorter long haul routes. Putting less efficient planes on shorter routes where they will see fewer hours per day and reserving newer and more efficient planes like 777-300ERs, 787s and A350s on longer routes makes sense. BA for the most part is using their newer and more efficient planes on longer routes like US West Coast, India and other points in Asia, but that isn’t always the case.

BA has quite a fleet mixture of configurations where some planes have first class and larger business classes while others have smaller business class cabins. Swapping configurations on a specific plane is expensive, so BA tends to adjust the amount of first class capacity that they offer when bringing in new planes. 787s have first class, but A350s don’t. 777-200s are mixed. It makes scheduling much more complicated.

Another factor is spare parts. Paying for having spare tires and key components at outstations can get expensive. Consolidating airplane types to specific cities can save money on spare part inventory, ground equipment and help with mechanic licenses/certificates.
 
chonetsao
Posts: 960
Joined: Sun Nov 06, 2005 3:55 pm

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 3:49 pm

JibberJim wrote:
dmstorm22 wrote:
Even W or Y tickets are generally more expensive than other European destinations.


Isn't that only because of the high UK APD rather than the actual ticket portion the airline sees? I always found NYC tickets super cheap 'cos of the sheer number of Y seats on the market supporting the J frequencies.


That is correct. I think I have seen BA advertise £299 LHR-JFK return when Nowegian was around. Considering the following taxes and fees for a return:
United States APHIS Passenger Fee Passengers (XA)
£2.90
United States Customs User Fee (YC)
£4.30
United Kingdom Passenger Service Charge Departures (UB)
£40.12
United Kingdom Exceptional Regulatory Charge (R1)
£8.90
United Kingdom Air Passenger Duty APD (GB)
£82.00
United States Immigration User Fee (XY)
£5.00
Carrier-imposed surcharge (YQ)
£210.00
US International Arrival Tax (US)
£27.60
United States Passenger Civil Aviation Security Service Fee (AY)
£4.00
US Passenger Facility Charge (XF)
£3.20
Subtotal per passenger
£388.02
(****Above figure is for October 2021 travel, the YQ, GB, R1 and UB are slightly higher than pre-Covid.**** )

Even at today's sale price of £331 LHR-JFK return on my BA app, I don't know how they do it. They are virtually give the Y ticket away at any sale (although I would argue the YQ is part of the fare!!!! But that is another story!!!)
 
slcdeltarumd11
Posts: 5202
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2004 7:30 am

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 7:24 pm

Nothing is set in stone at this point. We will see some airlines still trim or alter their summer schedules. Really what they run right now doesn't matter. Tourists and business travellers won't be back in full force this summer.
 
jfk777
Posts: 7490
Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 7:23 am

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 7:42 pm

chonetsao wrote:
JibberJim wrote:
dmstorm22 wrote:
Even W or Y tickets are generally more expensive than other European destinations.


Isn't that only because of the high UK APD rather than the actual ticket portion the airline sees? I always found NYC tickets super cheap 'cos of the sheer number of Y seats on the market supporting the J frequencies.


That is correct. I think I have seen BA advertise £299 LHR-JFK return when Nowegian was around. Considering the following taxes and fees for a return:
United States APHIS Passenger Fee Passengers (XA)
£2.90
United States Customs User Fee (YC)
£4.30
United Kingdom Passenger Service Charge Departures (UB)
£40.12
United Kingdom Exceptional Regulatory Charge (R1)
£8.90
United Kingdom Air Passenger Duty APD (GB)
£82.00
United States Immigration User Fee (XY)
£5.00
Carrier-imposed surcharge (YQ)
£210.00
US International Arrival Tax (US)
£27.60
United States Passenger Civil Aviation Security Service Fee (AY)
£4.00
US Passenger Facility Charge (XF)
£3.20
Subtotal per passenger
£388.02
(****Above figure is for October 2021 travel, the YQ, GB, R1 and UB are slightly higher than pre-Covid.**** )

Even at today's sale price of £331 LHR-JFK return on my BA app, I don't know how they do it. They are virtually give the Y ticket away at any sale (although I would argue the YQ is part of the fare!!!! But that is another story!!!)


Notice the Line about the APD " Air Passenger Duty", 82.00 Pounds Sterling. That is Tony Blair's lasting legacy, a despicable tax if there ever was one. The Tory Johnson Government should kill the tax, the UK has a surplus balance in airline services and this tax doesn't help the cause.

Their is also a 40 pounds for Passenger service charge departures, sounds like double taxation to me.
 
TC957
Posts: 4104
Joined: Wed May 23, 2012 1:12 pm

Re: NYC-London Aircraft Economics

Thu Mar 18, 2021 8:27 pm

The YQ tax is currently £170, not £210....just done a dummy BA LHR-JFK booking on Galileo for May dates.

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