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Aircraft Wheel Alignment

Posted: Mon Aug 16, 2021 6:50 pm
by 889091
Similar to a car's wheel alignment where the camber, toe-in/out, etc are periodically checked, is the alignment of an aircraft's wheels also routinely done? If so, how is it performed?

Thanks.

Re: Aircraft Wheel Alignment

Posted: Mon Aug 16, 2021 7:26 pm
by fr8mech
No, not on the big jets.

The only thing that is rigged is the steering system, and the wheel assemblies* have nothing to do with that. That’s all in the cabling and the valve.

*there is a possibility that a pair of nose tires that are a mismatch in wear…a new tire paired with an old, almost worn to limit tire can cause a steering system to pull in one direction. But, that’s not really an alignment issue.

Now, I don’t know if there are any checks performed in heavy payments maintenance with regards to how a bogie tracks, but we don’t do anything like that on the line.

Re: Aircraft Wheel Alignment

Posted: Tue Aug 17, 2021 1:35 am
by 77west
I read somewhere that after one landing the balance/alignment would be out so no point really.

Re: Aircraft Wheel Alignment

Posted: Tue Aug 17, 2021 1:59 am
by DarQuiet
In my experience, no alignment was done for wheels but there is for brakes of A320/A330, not mandatory though but savings can be realized if done properly like regular measurement of the brake wear pin and forecasting it with fleet utilization.

889091 wrote:
Similar to a car's wheel alignment where the camber, toe-in/out, etc are periodically checked, is the alignment of an aircraft's wheels also routinely done? If so, how is it performed?

Thanks.

Re: Aircraft Wheel Alignment

Posted: Tue Aug 17, 2021 2:29 am
by fr8mech
77west wrote:
I read somewhere that after one landing the balance/alignment would be out so no point really.


I’ve built up exactly 3 wheel assemblies in my 34 years in maintenance. Two B727-2xx mains and one B757 nose, and that was 33 years ago. We did balance them, but it was crude. There is a dot near the bead of the tire that denotes the heavy point. We would look at the outer wheel half and put the dot opposite the heaviest weight on the outer wheel half. Like I said…crude.

I suspect proper build-up shops will probably do an actual balance…with a machine and everything.