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convair880mfan
Topic Author
Posts: 226
Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2021 12:33 am

Are the engines used in repurposed jetliners damaged by the smoke particulates they ingest?

Fri Aug 20, 2021 10:36 pm

We have aerial fire fighting DC-10s at the Albuquerque International Sunport and I was wondering whether the jet engines of these and other turbine powered aerial jetliners suffer damage from the smoke and smoke particulates?

They fly quite low and it seems the engines would be ingesting some pretty nasty stuff. I know a Boeing 747 had multiple flameouts and engine damage when it flew through a cloud of volcanic ash once.

Do jet engines in aerial fire fighting need more frequent inspections and/or repairs and rebuilds?

The pilots who do this work seem very heroic to me and appear to push the envelope when involved in these missions.

Thanks to one and all who respond.
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 8362
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: Are the engines used in repurposed jetliners damaged by the smoke particulates they ingest?

Fri Aug 20, 2021 10:49 pm

They ingest that much, what maybe a few seconds every flight, and the planes utilization rate is pretty low. Volcanic ash is a whole different animal.
 
kalvado
Posts: 3311
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 4:29 am

Re: Are the engines used in repurposed jetliners damaged by the smoke particulates they ingest?

Fri Aug 20, 2021 10:52 pm

Without knowing for sure...
Volcanic ash is a very different thing chemically, it is a molten rock after all.
Acidic gases, in particular sulphur oxide, may damage engine - but forests are not generally rich with sulphur. Some nitrous oxide, maybe?
 
StereoTechque
Posts: 201
Joined: Sat Nov 28, 2015 7:24 am

Re: Are the engines used in repurposed jetliners damaged by the smoke particulates they ingest?

Sun Aug 22, 2021 9:55 am

Adding to above replies Volcanic ash is also very abrasive which resulted in a flame out of engine long back. Forest smoke may be chemically toxic in the long run but a few seconds of ingestion is pretty okay for the engine.
The Aircrafts may be shutting off the bleed when they fly over a smoke cloud to avoid smoky cabin.

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