Pacific
Topic Author
Posts: 1145
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2000 2:46 pm

Cockpit Question

Mon Sep 18, 2000 2:46 pm

My knowledge of an airplane cockpit is not great so please bear with me....
1. I'm wondering if pushing and pulling the steering wheel changes pitch attitude and turing the wheel makes the plane makes it go left and right, what do the pedals below do?
2. Where is the button/pedal for the plane's brakes?

(Can you specify the type of aircraft you describe, like B747?)
Thanks in advance!  
 
Guest

RE: Cockpit Question

Mon Sep 18, 2000 4:03 pm

If you push the yoke forward you go down.
Pull it towards you you go up.
Turn it to the left you turn left.
Turn it to the right you go right.

The pedals control the rudder, you use these with turning the yoke for a nice smooth turn. And if the wind is strong it will help keep going straight down the runway. You can alaso steer a bit on the taxi way with them. You can make hard turns with a tiller by your side!

Brakes are on the top of the pedals, press them and you slow down!

Iain
 
Ralgha
Posts: 1589
Joined: Tue Nov 09, 1999 6:20 pm

RE: Cockpit Question

Tue Sep 19, 2000 2:36 am

Push on a pedal and the airplane yaws in that direction, turn the yoke and it banks in that direction. Push forward on the yoke and the houses get bigger, pull back and they get smaller, pull back more and they get bigger again, pull back more and stomp a rudder and they start spinning and getting bigger really fast 

Brakes are usually located on top of each rudder pedal and if you push them, you slow down, provided you're on the ground, they don't do much in the air 
09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
 
Greeneyes53787
Posts: 817
Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2000 10:34 am

RE: Cockpit Question

Tue Sep 19, 2000 6:40 am

For conventional planes the wheel (yoke part that turns) makes the wings go up on one side while the other goes down. This happens when turning the wheel.

Then when you push the wheel (the wheel and what it is attached to) the elevator (on the tail) flips downward causing the tail to come up. When the tail is up the nose is down. Pull on the wheel and the tail goes down and the nose goes up.

The rudder is controlled by the pedals. Push the right one and turn, without banking, right.

--------------------------
--------------------------

On delta winged jobs--the wheel or stick gives the same effect. However, part of the tail is missing so the way it is accomplished is slightly different from conventional planes.

GE
 
Ralgha
Posts: 1589
Joined: Tue Nov 09, 1999 6:20 pm

RE: Greeneyes53787

Tue Sep 19, 2000 8:55 am

"Pull on the wheel and the tail goes down and the nose goes up. "

Eh....almost  the tail will go down and the nose will go up only if you are not stalled (both wing and tailplane stalls)

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: Cockpit Question

Tue Sep 19, 2000 11:18 am

The rudder pedals slide back and forth on the floor to move the rudder.

Most aircraft have toe brakes these days. You push on the top of the rudder pedal and it tips instead of slides. You push on the right pedel and the right brake engages, Same thing goes for the other side.

On some old airliners/aircraft such as the Stinson Reliant, they have heel brakes instead of toe brakes. You push on the bottom of the pedal with your heel instead of the top. This hasn't been done since the thirties, mainly because you can't push as hard with your heel as you can with your toe.

Not all aircraft use their petals for brakes. A lot of the older Pipers use what is known as the Johnson Bar. The easiest way to describe it is that it works like the parking brake on your car. It looks like parking brake arm on your car too, except it is mounted so you pull back on it instead of up. Pull on the handle and it engages the brakes, release it and it releases it engages the brakes. The downside to this braking system is that you loose the use of one of your hands that could be pulling back the throttle or flying the airplane. You also don't have any differental braking that could be useful for steering the aircraft.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: Cockpit Question

Tue Sep 19, 2000 11:26 am

The other thing I didn't mention is that it is usually pretty easy to tell when an aircraft has heel brakes because there will be these metal or leather hoops on the petels that your feel go under. That way you have something to push against when you apply the brakes.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
boomer
Posts: 108
Joined: Thu May 27, 1999 2:59 am

RE: Cockpit Question

Tue Sep 19, 2000 12:04 pm

Pull back past the thigh, all you see is sky.
Push to the dash- looks like you'll crash.
Turn to the left, pilot sees the house.
Turn to the right, copilot sees the house.
....ops check good.
 
Greeneyes53787
Posts: 817
Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2000 10:34 am

RE: Ralgha

Thu Sep 21, 2000 12:54 pm

Yes. Also, make sure the engine is running.

Further, be sure to look outside to see if the wings are still there.

GE
 
Guest

RE: L188

Fri Sep 22, 2000 6:22 am

The Johnson Bar?!  

Now I know you must be around a LOT of bush pilots.

Years ago (1981) at Oshkosh I flew on a Ford Trimotor. Right behind the throttle quadrant was this big gear shifter like you'd see in the cab of an 18 wheeler. The pilot was shifting it back and forth like a madman during our taxi out, and at the time I wondered what the hell it was for.

Reading a Flying magazine article on the Trimotor a few weeks after, it turned out that that was a Johnson Bar, but this one could be moved to the right to engage the right brake and to the left to engage the left brake. Being a tail-dragger, you can imagine that the pilot had his hands full.
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: Cockpit Question

Fri Sep 22, 2000 6:53 am

hehehe....Yeah I do DC9CAPT....

Anyway...I hadn't heard of one that could be used for differential braking.....Interesting....

I know that the Comanche that the company I worked for just got rid of also used on for braking. Yes that aircraft was used as a bush airplane too.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
Pacific
Topic Author
Posts: 1145
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2000 2:46 pm

RE: Cockpit Question

Tue Sep 26, 2000 8:47 am

Thanks to everyone for the responses. It's been very helpful.  
 
seb
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2005 2:19 am

RE: Cockpit Question

Sun Oct 01, 2000 8:47 am

Pacific

In response to your question lets examine the 747-400. Yes the yoke will steer it but not on the ground, the steering tiller on the side of the pilots and the rudder pedals those pedals you talked about when you push down on both of them at the same time that is your brakes. The parking break is to the left of the throttle quadrant it is a grey handle.

Hope this helps

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: hongkongflyer and 32 guests

Popular Searches On Airliners.net

Top Photos of Last:   24 Hours  •  48 Hours  •  7 Days  •  30 Days  •  180 Days  •  365 Days  •  All Time

Military Aircraft Every type from fighters to helicopters from air forces around the globe

Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos