Guest

Engine Fire Bottles

Thu Oct 12, 2000 5:41 pm

I am just curious, I have seen those round cannon ball looking fire bottles for an engine fire in the 737, there sitting right there in the wheel well hydrolics area. But what exact chemical compound do they contain. If anyone knows please let me know.
 
AAR90
Posts: 3140
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2000 11:51 am

RE: Engine Fire Bottles

Thu Oct 12, 2000 7:37 pm

Last I knew it was Bromotrifloromethane (sp?). A specific form of.... Halon.  
*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
 
b727
Posts: 464
Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 3:19 am

RE: Engine Fire Bottles

Thu Oct 12, 2000 8:58 pm

Yes, as AAR90 stated they are halon. Most models have 2 per engine. They are
set off by a switch on the flight deck. When the flight crew get a fire indication, they set the system off.

Hope this helps

Glenn
B727
(Fire Suppression Tech)
 
JT8DJET
Posts: 197
Joined: Fri Jul 07, 2000 12:28 am

RE: Engine Fire Bottles

Fri Oct 13, 2000 1:49 am

Bromotrifluoromethane or Halon 1301 has been banned by the EPA, because it is an ozone depleting substance. For the time being, the airline industry is exempt until a replacement can be found. The likely replacement will be Trifluoroiodomethane (Triodide) or Pentafluoroethane.
 
Guest

Thanks

Sat Oct 14, 2000 5:09 pm

Hey thanks for the answers guys, Just another note also, the 737's I work with have only 2 bottles for both engines, and 1 for the apu, if one engine has a fire, and they use both bottles on it, the second engine has no bottles left for it, but in that case I don't think your gonna end up to lucky anyways.
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: Engine Fire Bottles

Sat Oct 14, 2000 6:47 pm

Evilboy is correct with the systems that I have seen. Two bottles and a selector handle to choose what engine or powerplant to shoot the extigisher into.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
b727
Posts: 464
Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 3:19 am

RE: Engine Fire Bottles

Sat Oct 14, 2000 9:06 pm

This is also true with cargo hold suppression. There are two bottles but they can be discharged into either hold. But once they are discharged it is time for a recharge.

Glenn
B727
 
JETPILOT
Posts: 3094
Joined: Tue May 18, 1999 6:40 am

RE: Engine Fire Bottles

Tue Oct 17, 2000 5:08 am

Most large transport aircraft use compressed freon as an extinguishing agent.
 
b727
Posts: 464
Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 3:19 am

RE: Engine Fire Bottles

Wed Oct 18, 2000 3:17 am

Jet Pilot,

Halon is a form (and from the same family) of Halon .

They are working on another clean agent. Dupont has developed one that is used in computer labs. etc... Now it has to be approved by the FAA.

B727
Glenn
 
aaron atp
Posts: 517
Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2000 1:17 pm

RE: Engine Fire Bottles

Wed Oct 18, 2000 7:19 am

Halon 1301 (bromotrifluoromethane (CBrF3)), is also known as Freon FE 1301. The Term Halogenated Hydrocarbon (which is another name for the Freon family) is where Halon gets its name, although it is still a Freon (and CFC).

I think that is what B727 meant when he wrote: Halon is a form (and from the same family) of Halon


aaron
 
b727
Posts: 464
Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 3:19 am

RE: Engine Fire Bottles

Thu Oct 19, 2000 2:05 am

Yes Aaron atp that is what I meant. I was tired when I wrote it before.

Glenn
 
crjmech
Posts: 257
Joined: Wed Jun 07, 2000 6:31 am

RE: Engine Fire Bottles

Thu Oct 19, 2000 3:41 am

I should hope that Freon isn't used as a fire supression agent. I was told in A&P school that phosgene gas is produced when Freon-12 is exposed to an open flame. Phosgene is the active ingredient in mustard gas.
Thou shalt mind thine altitude,lest the ground reach up and smite thee.
 
aaron atp
Posts: 517
Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2000 1:17 pm

Crjmech

Thu Oct 19, 2000 5:41 am

Ever heard of R13B1?

It's the common refrigerant name of Halon 1301, and yes, any chlorinated compound can create phosgene when heated.

...it's not a huge concern, when an engine is burning, there are worse things to worry about.



aaron
 
jim
Posts: 448
Joined: Thu Jul 29, 1999 8:12 am

Aaron Atp Et Al

Sat Oct 21, 2000 11:09 am

Folks,

I thought the agent used was Halon 1211, due to the corrosive properties of 1301.

Too bad the bottles aren't labled  

Jim
 
aaron atp
Posts: 517
Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2000 1:17 pm

Jim...

Sat Oct 21, 2000 7:30 pm

I believe 1301 is inert (eg. no corrosion) for most temperature ranges, and is the safest of all Halon extinguishing agents. 1211 is second to 1301 in both safety and average performance. 1211's greatest benefit is a higher boiling point, which allows it to be discharged in more liquid form, for greater range in portable extinguishers.

According to AC 20-42c, 1301 and 1211 both form toxic products when decomposed by heat (~900°F), but 1211 produces toxins not produced by 1301. It also warns to never discharge 1211 on Class D fires.

1211 = ABC
1301 = BCD


aaron
 
galaxy5
Posts: 1952
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2000 10:09 pm

RE: Jim...

Thu Oct 26, 2000 9:06 am

most fire bottles still use 1301 alot are also using 1211 too. the plane i fly on (c-5) uses both. it uses the 1211 for engine and apu fire extinguishing and uses 1301 for internal ( cabin area fires) on top of the the C-5 also uses LN2 ( liquid nitrogen ) which can be selected and dispersed all over the aircraft from the wheel wells to the engine and pylons and leading edge of the wings.
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