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First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 9:06 am
by ba1978
Does anyone know when thrust reversers first began to appear on aircraft and on what type of aircraft?

RE: First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 9:16 am
by Richard28
Let me first point out that I am non expert!


however, do not propeller planes have thrust reversers by reversing the blade pitch?

This would mean it was a long long time ago - but I'll leave it for the experts to give you the full and complete answer!

RE: First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 9:27 am
by iflyatldl
I'm no expert either, but I thought the same thing about propeller blades. And now, there are some a/c that don't even reverse thrust. Helicopters...not included.  Innocent

RE: First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 9:29 am
by ba1978
I was thinking more of the reversers on jet engines, but thanks anyway.

RE: First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 9:36 am
by will
T/Rev's on the first jet airliner was "I Think" the Comet 4.

I could be wrong but I remember seeing an old marketing presentation on the Comet 4 years ago. The T/Revs technology was presented as an advancement in airliner landing performance.. Etc..

Regards,

Will........

RE: First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 9:40 am
by timz
Pretty sure the 707 always had them, but the Comet 4 didn't at first? As for earlier military jets-- hm. I'm guessing none.

RE: First Thrust Reverser

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 9:46 am
by isitsafenow
The reverser on the DC 8 and 707 were pretty much like the "cans" of today.
The principle is the same..Reverse the thrust and slow the aircraft down while applying brakes. What you really need to notice about the first 707's of the late 50's was the mufflers on the back of the engine. This was to reduce noise.
After the fan was added to the engines and more air was inducted into the engine, the use for mufflers died. The engines were a little quieter with a larger intake of air. From the factory Boeing called them the B model.
707-120
707-120B(fans)
707-320
707-320B(fans)
The 320 was the intercontinental version...a little bigger plane with more powerful engines and a longer range.
safe

RE: First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 9:50 am
by iflyatldl
BA1978:We know, and pardon the punn. Big grin I would think with the early jets: perhaps the Comet, the early canadien jet I can't think of the name of and the 707, even the Caravelle, in that case, I think it's thust reversers were in the form of a parachute.  Smile Somebody, please jump in, I'm spent!  Innocent

RE: First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 7:48 pm
by CV990

Hi!

I don't know about the Comet, but the ones I know they had from the start were the Caravelle VI-R and the DC-8 from Series 10/30/30 and 40. The DC-8 reverse was more like a clams shell, it was a noise supresor but also when it landed those clams would close and the flux from the engine would go to the side. I don't know about the early series of the 707 but probably they had too, but it was not so evident like in the DC-8.
regards

RE: First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 8:08 pm
by Guest
I remember vaguely something about reversers in Hawker Hunter fighters...
Early 1950s... they experimented the use of T/Rs on that type.
But I cannot recall for airliners, when they appeared.
Comet IV - two engines could be put in reverse...
Caravelles - only appeared on Caravelle VI-R and subsequent models.
And the 707s or DC8s had reversers from the first production models.
xxx
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper

RE: First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Fri Mar 19, 2004 9:39 am
by timz
I still like the 707. Brooks says early Comet 4s got reversers "retrospectively".

RE: First Thrust Reversers

Posted: Fri Mar 19, 2004 2:16 pm
by 411A
For those that are interested, the reversers on the early B707's (non-fan engines) were not all that effective...but they sure did make a LOT of noise in the process.

Early DC-8's also had ejectors...but someone that flew DC8's will have to explain this better, as I never operated the big 4-engine Douglas.