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VS4ever
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Aviation Terminology - Help!

Sat Jul 17, 2004 6:51 am

General question to everyone.

Does anybody know of a good place, either a book or on-line to find a list of aviation terminology and definitions?

For example, I am thinking on the lines of C Check, D Check, APU and other such acroynms.

Any help you could give would be greatly appreciated.

VS4ever!
That feeling when you sit at the end of a runway, brakes are released and the raw power takes over. Now that is a thing of beauty and it never gets old.
 
flymia
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Sat Jul 17, 2004 7:39 am

Well APU is Auxillary Power Unite. Dont know a site to find any others though. That would be intresting.
"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
 
dl757md
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Sat Jul 17, 2004 7:42 am

757 Most beautiful airliner in the sky!
 
liamksa
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Sat Jul 17, 2004 9:07 am

There's a decent list of TLA's (  Big grin ) here in a past thread

https://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/56214/
 
LimaFoxTango
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Sat Jul 17, 2004 9:45 am

Easy one first. APU is the Auxilliary Power Unit. This is just a little engine at the back of most planes which supplies power to the aircraft while the engines are off. Ever been near to an airplane and you hear a noise that sounds like the engine, but when you look the engines are off? Well, thats the APU running.

C & D Checks. At various intervals within a planes life, it has to do certain maintenance checks which calls for practically every part of the aircraft has to be taken out, checked and reassembled. I believe C & D Checks are not the only type of these checks out there. There could be A, B C, D, etc etc etc checks. Difference letters, different checks. I bet someone here can explain this better.
You are said to be a good pilot when your take-off's equal your landings.
 
SlamClick
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Sat Jul 17, 2004 10:19 am

VS4ever geez man, if it was all written down, any rookie could use those terms. Then how could us veterans of the biz sound like skygods?

ASA publications (which publishes the FARs) offers a dicitonary of aviation terms. Bought mine a few years ago and don't have it with me, so I don't remember the price. Pretty good stuff.

Other than that, read the technical magazines over the private pilot ones, keep reading the Tech/Ops forum over the non-av and so on. It will come to you.
Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
 
7574EVER
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Sat Jul 17, 2004 3:09 pm

ASA publications (which publishes the FARs) offers a dicitonary of aviation terms. Bought mine a few years ago and don't have it with me, so I don't remember the price. - SlamClick

Paid $19.95 for mine.
Right rudder....Right rudder...Come on, more right rudder....Right rudder......Aw forget it, I quit!!
 
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VS4ever
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Sat Jul 17, 2004 3:10 pm

Thanks folks, this wasn't actually for me, but my boss who wanted some bedtime reading!

I'll look up ASA and see what they have to offer.

As for rookies vs experts, the answer is simple. You can use the terms all you want, doesn't mean you truly understand what they mean. That takes knowledge and experience, something I know most Skygods have!

Thanks for the help, anything further you find, let me know.

VS4ever  Smile/happy/getting dizzy
That feeling when you sit at the end of a runway, brakes are released and the raw power takes over. Now that is a thing of beauty and it never gets old.
 
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TS-IOR
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Sun Jul 18, 2004 8:46 pm


...just ask on this forum every time you need to precise a term !!!

there's no better place...
 
L-188
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Sun Jul 18, 2004 11:08 pm

That ASA book is a pretty good reference source.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
QantasA332
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Mon Jul 19, 2004 7:23 am

"Air Pilot's Glossary And Reference Guide" by David Bruford (Airlife Publishing) is another good terminology reference to have a look for...

Cheers,
QantasA332 (happily typing away on a hotel guest computer here in cold New Zealand Big grin)
 
bsergonomics
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Tue Jul 20, 2004 6:52 am

For the US Department of Defence, see:

http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/doddict/ (JP1-02)


For US Acronyms and Abbreviations, See:

http://www.gps.tc.faa.gov/glossary.html

There are hundreds of other definitions and acronym/abbreviation sites.

=======

Aside:

ACRONYM - A Contrived Reduction Of Nomenclature Yielding Mnmemonics


The definition of a 'Pessimist': an Optimist with experience...
 
cancidas
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Tue Jul 20, 2004 2:00 pm

Bsergonomics, i really don't get your signature.

Take me to 60000 feet at 600 kts and let me pull the yellow and black handle...??

i know what the yellow and black handle is, but why would anyone want to do that at FL600 and 600kts?
"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
 
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VS4ever
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Wed Jul 21, 2004 5:04 am

Once again, thanks guys, very useful indeed!  Smile/happy/getting dizzy
That feeling when you sit at the end of a runway, brakes are released and the raw power takes over. Now that is a thing of beauty and it never gets old.
 
bsergonomics
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Fri Jul 23, 2004 7:38 am

Cancidas,

This post isn't really related to the topic, so check out Def Stan 00-970 Part 1/3, Section 2, Page 6 (available from http://www.dstan.mod.uk) for abbreviations related to the flight portion of UK military aircraft design.

Have you never thought about ejecting? There is no singular experience like it on the planet... Think of yourself in a warm, comfortable cockpit. You pull the Yellow And Black Handle (the ejection seat firing handle). Then, shortly after, your canopy is shattered by the MDC (the abbreviations differ, but let's use the US version - Minature Detonating Cord - there's another relevant thing for this post), pull 17g (briefly) as you are literally shot out of the aircraft. You are immediately hit with a freezing wind blast at 600 knots (Note: 600kts is generally considered to be the highest survivable airspeed during ejection; a Russian pilot once survived an ejection at Mach 2.25, but it was a case of 'die in the aircraft or die ejecting'). Then you start to fall. And fall. And fall (Zero G? Oh, Yes!). You are twelve miles above the Earth's surface. Even at the terminal velocities experienced near the ground, it would take you some six to eight minutes to reach ten thousand feet AMSL. Once you reach that altitude (depending on your seat system), your seat seperates and your main parachute opens (many seats separate immediately after ejection - in any case, you'll have your drogue 'chute). Your Personal Survival Pack (PSP - there's another acronym for this post) drops on the cord below you. You then parachute down to the ground (the time needed depends on a variety of factors... still, it is probably more than a couple of minutes)... In the process, your spine will be shortened by about two inches (5cm - it grows back after about 6 months, but you can only sustain a few of these shocks). You are likely to suffer wind burn and, at that altitude, some effects of hypothermia and (in extreme cases) frostbite.

But can you think of anything else on (or near) the planet even like it?

Bring It On!
The definition of a 'Pessimist': an Optimist with experience...
 
Super Em
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RE: Aviation Terminology - Help!

Fri Jul 23, 2004 1:25 pm

Ever been near to an airplane and you hear a noise that sounds like the engine, but when you look the engines are off? Well, thats the APU running.

That's true.Especially the CRJ's. Those things are loud.

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