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Aircraft Commonality

Posted: Thu Nov 04, 2004 3:48 pm
by videns
I see Boeing's website talking about commonality between 757 and 767 aircraft.

I also see Airbus' website talking about commonality between A320 family aircraft, A330/340 family aircraft...

They talk about crew commonality.
I personally consider people working on "anything" part of the crew that operates that "anything"...
But besides my personal opinion, my question is this:
How much commonality is there between aircraft families from a maintenance point of view?
Every one of these machines seems to be pretty unique, despite them being just a stretch or shortening of the fuselage. Wires probably get routed differently, same with hydraulics, and what not... Not to mention the A330/340 families, with one having twice the engines the other one has (although different types)...
I would just like to hear from the mechanics out there who actually have to maintain aircraft that are supposed to share commonality... Is it real, or is it just a marketing Spiel?...

Thanks in advance;
Videns

RE: Aircraft Commonality

Posted: Thu Nov 04, 2004 3:59 pm
by QantasA332
Is [commonality] real, or is it just a marketing Spiel?

The short answer is 'yes.' Yes, commonality certainly exists and it is an important consideration which airlines do take into account. In general, commonality within a fleet is indeed substantial enough to make an ecomonic and operational difference (that said, it is certainly not the end-all be-all issue involved). I'll let the folks who have worked on the 'common' aircraft families in question to expand on what aspects are common and what are not...

Cheers,
QantasA332

RE: Aircraft Commonality

Posted: Thu Nov 04, 2004 10:46 pm
by air2gxs
The B757/B767 share alot of common components and locations, but probabaly have an equal amount that are not common. Off-hand, the hydraulic system and the air-conditioning systems are different.

I think when we talk commonality on aircraft we are talking more philosophy than the aircraft actually being identical. And its more a flight crew issue than a maintenance issue.

RE: Aircraft Commonality

Posted: Thu Nov 04, 2004 11:13 pm
by dl757md
I think it is important to remember the term is commonality not identicality.
The idea was to reduce the differences between types not eliminate them as that is not possible.

Dl757Md

RE: Aircraft Commonality

Posted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 12:41 am
by HAWK21M
Commonality from the Mx point of view is Important,Having Different Aircraft increases a Companys stores Inventory,leading to increased costs.It would be more Economical to store common spares.
On the B737NGs for instance There are slight differences between the -700s & the -800s in certain systems,not major but still differences exist.
However Commonality is good for Maintenance as it requires studying a particular or similiar type.
regds
HAWK

RE: Aircraft Commonality

Posted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 12:18 pm
by 320tech
The A320 series has sufficient commonality that we have to remember the aircraft number to know which type we're working on. To be sure, there are differences, but there are greater differences between the older 320 series with CFM56-5A engines, and the newer ones with CFM56-5B's (not just in the engines).

Maintenance procedures and parts are generally the same between the 319, 320, and 321.

In short, commonality in the 320 series makes our jobs much easier.

RE: Aircraft Commonality

Posted: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:12 pm
by videns
What about the 757 and 767? They are VERY different aircraft in terms of shape, size, engines, power requirements, air conditioning requirements, etc...
Is commonality in this case more of a matter of where systems are located/routed through (like Air2gxs said), or do they really share all that many components and parts?

Answers appreciated.

Videns

RE: Aircraft Commonality

Posted: Wed Jan 11, 2006 10:09 pm
by Starlionblue
Quoting Videns (Thread starter):
Not to mention the A330/340 families, with one having twice the engines the other one has (although different types)...

The 330/340-200/300 are for most intents and purposes the same plane with different numbers of engines, some small wing variations and different size empennage. The inside pylons on the 340 are even in the same location as the 330 pylons.

Quoting Videns (Reply 6):
What about the 757 and 767? They are VERY different aircraft in terms of shape, size, engines, power requirements, air conditioning requirements, etc...

Sure but a lot of the parts are supposed to be the same if you drink the Boeing Cool-Aid.