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flymatt2bermud
Topic Author
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Tricks Of The Trade.

Thu Jul 13, 2006 6:03 am

Over the years I have learned some neat little ideas that have benefited me greatly. One Swiss operator shared that they add a little vodka to their aircraft water tank in the winter to keep the lines from freezing. Note: They also are forbidden to use that water for brewing coffee.

Our popular idea with others was to carry cheap mouthwash aboard aircraft with recirculating toilets. Adding it to a ripe recirc toilet will make it much more tolerable for a few more hours.

Have you come up with ideas as such that you will share?
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
 
kaddyuk
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Thu Jul 13, 2006 9:43 am

Acetone is the best thing in the world for removing the brown sticky goo left behind from Speedtape...

Adding DC4 electrical grease to a whistling door seal will normally shut it up...
Whoever said "laughter is the best medicine" never had Gonorrhea
 
Dougloid
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:38 pm

Quoting Kaddyuk (Reply 1):
Adding DC4 electrical grease to a whistling door seal will normally shut it up...

DC4 is good stuff. It's got a myriad of good uses.

When I was in the engine repair line, installing a nose cone and prop shaft in a Garrett was a problem sometimes because of the prop shaft end bearing rollers drooping in their cage. I always used Crisco to hold them in place (not the buttery flavor kind). As long as this was not overdone it was fine.

After an engine repair, I'd run it for a while and then take a plastic tube and suck up a little engine oil into a clear plastic sandwich bag and hold it up to the sunlight to see whether there was any metal particulate matter. If there was I'd change the oil filter and run it again for a half hour and continue doing this until it cleared up.

I knew that the first thing that the operator would do when he got home was exactly the same thing. This saved a lot of unnecessary road trips.
If you believe in coincidence, you haven't looked close enough-Joe Leaphorn
 
aogdesk
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:41 pm

Quoting FlyMatt2Bermud (Thread starter):
Our popular idea with others was to carry cheap mouthwash aboard aircraft with recirculating toilets. Adding it to a ripe recirc toilet will make it much more tolerable for a few more hours.

Adding vodka to the bluejuice will make it slightly more palatable. Carry some of that mouthwash though.  Wink
 
flymatt2bermud
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Fri Jul 14, 2006 4:42 am

Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 3):
Adding vodka to the bluejuice will make it slightly more palatable

I don't think I'll be drinking any of that palatable blue juice. Your note reminds me of the movie 'Vegas Vacation' when Chevy Chase emerged from the lav with a blue arm and leg. I would have needed lots of vodka.
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
 
n8076u
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Fri Jul 14, 2006 5:33 am

Wash hands thoroughly if you've been working with Skydrol, before you visit the restroom.  hot 

Speaking of blue juice, when I worked overhaul, we used regular water from a hose to fill up the toilet tanks to leak-check everything, etc. It didn't make you gag as much if you were stuck in the lav for an extended time than with the real blue stuff, and the flow was easier to manage. Spills inside the lav was also less of a hassle to clean up if it was plain water. When you were done, and you drained most of the water, we had these little packets you could throw in, and it turned the regular water into the blue water, as it was merely a concentrated powder of the same thing. Saved you the trouble of draining all the water, and dragging out the honey cart's fill hose to precharge the lavs from the cart's blue water tank. Yes, long explanation for something stupid.  Smile


Chris
Don't blame me, I don't work here...
 
flymatt2bermud
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Fri Jul 14, 2006 6:11 am

Quoting N8076U (Reply 5):
we had these little packets you could throw in, and it turned the regular water into the blue water, as it was merely a concentrated powder of the same thing

Lav service is getting expense these days. It's cheaper to use Evian. Really some airports want $100 to $125 per service. That may not sound like much on a large airliner but a biz jet that just came in from a two hour flight and is going to be sitting on the ramp in the sun all weekend, you really can not afford not to dump.

But at $125, I'm here to tell you we might start carrying more Evian and finding the little blue packet vendor. You just need to be careful because the skin breaks easy on those little pills and it will do a number on staining the floor or your pants pocket--just ask Chevy Chase. Oops, I should've taken those to the cleaners.
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
 
n8076u
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Fri Jul 14, 2006 6:37 am

Quoting FlyMatt2Bermud (Reply 6):
But at $125, I'm here to tell you we might start carrying more Evian and finding the little blue packet vendor. You just need to be careful because the skin breaks easy on those little pills

If I remember right, the brand name of those packets was Honey Bee. Whether that has any relation to why the lav service cart is nicknamed the "honey cart", I do not know.  Wink

The packets we had were made of some sort of paper that dissolved quickly. If you held on to one too long it would start to come through and stain your hand, so wearing gloves and working quickly was of utmost importance!

Chris
Don't blame me, I don't work here...
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Fri Jul 14, 2006 4:23 pm

Quoting N8076U (Reply 5):
Wash hands thoroughly if you've been working with Skydrol, before you visit the restroom

 bigthumbsup  bigthumbsup  bigthumbsup 

regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
n8076u
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Fri Jul 14, 2006 6:16 pm

On the PW4000s that we had on our 747-400s and 767-300s, sometimes you'd get a fuel or oil leak from the drain mast, but you couldn't quite determine where it was coming from. Sometimes, more than one of the drain lines (drivepad drains, case drains) were plumbed together into one common line. If you disconnect where the unit's drain connects to the common drain and put a plastic baggie over each one and tape it in place, you can then do an idle run, and check the bags to see what exactly is leaking. Luckily, most of the time, it was obvious when you disconnect each individual line. But this bag trick came in handy a couple times, once when there was a fuel puddle under the engine only after it came in after a flight, but no leak after an idle run. We had to do a high power run to find that one. Of course, this trick should work on other engines too.  Wink

Chris
Don't blame me, I don't work here...
 
FlyingColours
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:29 pm

Quoting N8076U (Reply 7):
The packets we had were made of some sort of paper that dissolved quickly. If you held on to one too long it would start to come through and stain your hand, so wearing gloves and working quickly was of utmost importance!

Ahh the blue teabags  Wink, last year it was our responsibility to drop them down (2 per lav) downroute. Now that wasn't in the job description  Smile

I'll jot down the FA tricks and tips later on

Phil
FlyingColours
Lifes a train racing towards you, now you can either run away or grab a chair & a beer and watch it come - Phil
 
midnights
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Fri Jul 14, 2006 10:37 pm

Pepsi/Coke works great to clean bugs from a windshield, gum from a tray table and anything spilled and baked in an oven....SP-40 (our version of WD-40) will take any sort of graffitti off tray tables left by little artists. Also, a friend of mine gave his wife a small squirt bottle full of skydrol in place of mace or pepper spray and told her to shoot for the face and eyes....she hasn't had to use it but I know how well that could work, not too sure how leagle that is.
 
Dougloid
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 1:04 am

Quoting Midnights (Reply 11):
Pepsi/Coke works great to clean bugs from a windshield, gum from a tray table and anything spilled and baked in an oven....SP-40 (our version of WD-40) will take any sort of graffitti off tray tables left by little artists. Also, a friend of mine gave his wife a small squirt bottle full of skydrol in place of mace or pepper spray and told her to shoot for the face and eyes....she hasn't had to use it but I know how well that could work, not too sure how leagle that is.

I used to keep a small 4 ounce squeeze bottle of olive oil in my rollaway and a pack of paper matches. Occasionally someone would get an eyeful of skydrol and olive oil's very good to flush it out of the eyes while you're heading for the eyewash station. One night out on the ramp a mech named Kevin Thorne got a facefull and I had to lead him to the eyewash station because he was instantly blinded. We got him squared away but his eyes looked like hell for a few days,


The paper matches are for small particles in the eye. When one's torn out of the book, the end is very soft and can be used to remove a small particle from the eye.
If you believe in coincidence, you haven't looked close enough-Joe Leaphorn
 
NKP S2
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 1:34 am

Quoting N8076U (Reply 9):
On the PW4000s that we had on our 747-400s and 767-300s, sometimes you'd get a fuel or oil leak from the drain mast, but you couldn't quite determine where it was coming from. Sometimes, more than one of the drain lines (drivepad drains, case drains) were plumbed together into one common line. If you disconnect where the unit's drain connects to the common drain and put a plastic baggie over each one and tape it in place, you can then do an idle run, and check the bags to see what exactly is leaking. Luckily, most of the time, it was obvious when you disconnect each individual line. But this bag trick came in handy a couple times, once when there was a fuel puddle under the engine only after it came in after a flight, but no leak after an idle run. We had to do a high power run to find that one. Of course, this trick should work on other engines too.

Very common thing, bagging the individual pad drains and running to check for leaks. Sometimes we've checked the breather exhaust as well...a "B & B check". Sometimes we've added a special flourescent dye to the oil and then run, then check the engine with a UV light. Since it's not possible to do a leak check on the cores of many or most High-bypass fan engines while running ( C-ducts open ) you need to resort to tell-tale methods such as these.
 
NKP S2
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 1:38 am

One more thing: 'Kroil". Makes every other penetrating oil seem like a "cotter pin in a can". Great stuff that'll help break just about fastener loose.
 
Dougloid
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 3:27 am

Quoting NKP S2 (Reply 14):
One more thing: 'Kroil". Makes every other penetrating oil seem like a "cotter pin in a can". Great stuff that'll help break just about fastener loose.

Kroil is good stuff, no doubt about it.


Removing and replacing Huckbolts on Westwind fuel tanks. Get yourself a die grinder with a small carbide cherry in it. Tape off the area with a couple courses of aluminum painter's tape because it's likely she'll take off and run once or twice. Grind the center of the Huckbolt and dish it out a ways. Start the center pin with a punch and finish with a pin punch. Then drill the sleeve a bit, take a close fitting punch and snap the head off the Huckbolt-after you have removed the clinching ring. Take a pin punch a bit smaller than the hole and drive the rest of the sleeve out.

Don't forget to retrieve the pin and sleeve when you're in there and check your hole size before resealing and reinstalling. Huck rivets come in slight oversizes for abused holes and you can ream them for a nice fit.
If you believe in coincidence, you haven't looked close enough-Joe Leaphorn
 
n8076u
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 3:43 am

Quoting NKP S2 (Reply 13):
Sometimes we've checked the breather exhaust as well...

We used to do a 20 minute high-power run to "check" the breather for leakage. If it was dry right after the run, you were good, if not, engine change.  Wink

Quoting NKP S2 (Reply 13):
Since it's not possible to do a leak check on the cores of many or most High-bypass fan engines while running

I've never seen it done, but according to our maintenance manual, you can idle run the PW4000s with the core partially exposed. You had to remove the core cowls completely, reverser cowls must be closed, fan cowls could be left open, and have a dedicated person with a large fire extinguisher at the ready. Since that didn't do much good, as the majority of the problems would require the reverser cowls to be open to actually see something, and nobody wanted to be in the fan flow of an engine that's running, it was never done that way.  Wink

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 12):
I used to keep a small 4 ounce squeeze bottle of olive oil

I remember a couple guys always had a bottle of oil (castor, olive) in their toolboxes.

Here's another tip: Never keep superglue in your pocket, if you use eyedrops. We had one guy that had eye problems, and always used eyedrops several times a day. One time, he grabbed his eyedrops and medicated his eye with superglue instead. Our Loctite superbonder adhesive came in a little squeezebottle that was very similar to his eyedrops. He ended up being okay after a quick dash to the ER.

Chris
Don't blame me, I don't work here...
 
kaddyuk
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 7:17 am

Quoting N8076U (Reply 16):
I remember a couple guys always had a bottle of oil (castor, olive) in their toolboxes.

I've got a small bottle of castor oil in my box, however milk will solve skydrol in the eyes as well. Be careful however because the bacteria in milk could cause an infection (never heard of it though).

Tinfoil around bleed air joints when leak checking... If you have a leak, it will destroy the tinfoil...
Whoever said "laughter is the best medicine" never had Gonorrhea
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 9:45 am

Quoting Kaddyuk (Reply 17):
Be careful however because the bacteria in milk could cause an infection (never heard of it though).

Not if it's pasteurized milk in an unopened carton/bottle.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
CosmicCruiser
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 10:49 am

From the pilot point of view...always open the yogurt facing away from you!!
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 11:09 am

Quoting CosmicCruiser (Reply 19):
From the pilot point of view...always open the yogurt facing away from you!!

Same for pax! But I find that poking a hole in the lid with the fork before opening is a better option.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
cancidas
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 11:30 am

wear your cell phone in a pouch and not on a belt clip, less of a chance of it getting lost when you have to use the net on an overweight flight. have nonreved to too many stations after work just to pick up cell phones lost in the bellies...


keep a leatherman and flashlight on your belt, especially when you're deicing.
"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
 
2H4
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 11:46 am



When reaching into the gap of a control surface during preflight to inspect hinges, nuts, etc, hold the control surface firmly in place with your other hand to prevent the wind or another person from chopping your finger off....




2H4


Intentionally Left Blank
 
Dougloid
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 1:25 pm

Quoting Kaddyuk (Reply 17):
Tinfoil around bleed air joints when leak checking... If you have a leak, it will destroy the tinfoil...

Good one. I used to drape a shop towel over the couplings on Canadair Challengers-the asbestos biscuits they used in the couplings were leaky bastards. They'd flutter where there was a leak.

Oh....this one's important fellows.

Never mark your tools with your name. Think about it for a while and you'll understand why I say that.

And if a guy in the shop is a tattletale, have nothing to do with him.

I worked for Atlantic Aviation for a while, a Merlin came in with a bad paint job. They'd not masked off the air intakes so painted the first stage of the compressors and the paint flakes plugged up the filters and the pitot static instruments stopped working. So me and this other guy put air on the venturi they used and were able to determine that the filters were completely plugged because the instruments worked as advertised. We figured on cleaning it all out the next day.

That night the cleaners shot compressed air in the static ports on the fuselage and killed the pitot static instruments.

When me and the other guy came to work, of course nothing worked like it was supposed to. There was a guy in the shop, had been a Saberliner pilot, went to work for Aircraft technical publishers, IM me if you want to know his name, he spent the entire day trying to convince the boss that me and Mike had ruined the guy's instruments, which had to be rebuilt.

Avoid the company of tattlers and teacher's pets. They'll try to screw you to make themselves look good.

Stay on good terms with your crew chief and don't ever let him get the idea you're a whiner or a 40 hour a week man. Refuse OT or road trips rarely and only for good reasons. Your crew chief will remember you if you didn't pitch in and help him out of a jam.

You want to be the guy with answers and solutions, not questions and problems.

Don't be a cheapskate about sharing knowledge. How did you learn?

Do impeccable work, and make it look good too.

Avoid associating with the shop drunks-there are always a few of them.

Stay organized. Avoid slob mechanics. They are a dime a dozen, and they're disorganized people. Disorganized people lose track of important details and they'll always try and blame whoever's handy when the chickens come home to roost.

This is the best tip. It came from a guy who worked for Hughes Aircraft and disappeared, only to be found 8 years later living under an assumed name.

"Never get good at something you don't like, because you'll end up doing it forever."

That applies to fuel leaks, boys, I'm here to tell you.
If you believe in coincidence, you haven't looked close enough-Joe Leaphorn
 
n8076u
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 3:43 pm

Dougloid, that's one extensive list you put together!

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 23):
Never mark your tools with your name.

I can't stress the importance of this one.  Wink

Chris
Don't blame me, I don't work here...
 
ThirtyEcho
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 5:00 pm

If you are renting an older C172, with a tach timer rather than a Hobbs meter, cruise at the bottom of the green. It will cost you a few knots but it will make the tach timer run much more slowly.
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 6:15 pm

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 23):

Nice Tips.
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sat Jul 15, 2006 9:43 pm

Great list Dougloid. Many of those apply in any job.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 22):


When reaching into the gap of a control surface during preflight to inspect hinges, nuts, etc, hold the control surface firmly in place with your other hand to prevent the wind or another person from chopping your finger off....

My daughter has a wooden box with a hinged lid that has blocks inside. She put one hand in the gap and pressed down on the lid with the other hand. She looked completely mystified, then started crying. But she kept pressing! Poor baby got a red thumb. So I'm glad to hear adults still manage this trick  Wink
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
n8076u
Posts: 419
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:40 am

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 27):
My daughter has a wooden box with a hinged lid that has blocks inside. She put one hand in the gap and pressed down on the lid with the other hand. She looked completely mystified, then started crying. But she kept pressing! Poor baby got a red thumb. So I'm glad to hear adults still manage this trick

Along those lines regarding "traps", here's another tip: If you must work in the nose gear well of a 747, and the doors are open, make sure the handle is in the "open" position. I've seen a guy get caught right between the doors when hydraulics were put on and he "thought" he would be okay and continued working after he was told power was coming on, but the handle was in the stow position after all. He lived, and was out of work for a couple months. Luckily, it got him in the legs, rather than higher. I've heard of another guy at another airline that went to close the nose gear doors with hydraulics powered on a 747 classic (handle is inside the wheelwell). Right when he actuated the doors, he slipped and got decapitated as the doors closed. This may have been the reason for moving the handle outside of the wheelwell on the 747-400s.

Here's another tip, anytime the state of the aircraft is going to change (electrical power coming on, hydraulics coming on, pneumatics, etc), take a break and make sure where you are working isn't going to become your coffin.

There was a 757 in one of the hangars at SFO being worked on (the old service center). Somebody for whatever reason put the gear handle to "up" (from what I heard, someone was cleaning the cockpit, and did that for better access). An announcement was made for hydraulics coming on, and one guy working in the E/E compartment stepped back to be safe about it. Whoever went to the cockpit apparently didn't check anything and just threw on the hydraulic power. The aircraft's nose gear retracted, putting the tail through the roof of the hangar, and crushing the ladder under the E/E compartment, that the guy was standing on a minute before. Luckily nobody got hurt. The guy in the cockpit then learned something else he didn't know. Once on its nose, a 757's nose gear will not be able to raise the aircraft out of that "oh sh*t" position, as he tried that next. I think they made him a supervisor after that...

New to working on the 737 3/4/500? The 6/7/8/900s may be similar, but I don't know firsthand, and can only assume so. Don't open the inboard engine reverser cowlings and then drop the flaps. You'll find out real quick that the inboard leading edge flap wants to occupy the same space as the inboard reverser cowling does.  Wink Yes, there are a couple work-arounds for this.

Chris
Don't blame me, I don't work here...
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sun Jul 16, 2006 4:06 am

Quoting N8076U (Reply 28):
Once on its nose, a 757's nose gear will not be able to raise the aircraft out of that "oh sh*t" position, as he tried that next. I think they made him a supervisor after that...

Well duh... There's always someone looking for a quick fix.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
flymatt2bermud
Topic Author
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sun Jul 16, 2006 4:23 am

There is some really good info here. It's the kind of stuff that is not in the manual and they forget to mention in 'indoc'. I was hoping this thread would pull some of these experiences. These things could save an eye or a life.
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
 
ReidYYZ
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:58 pm

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 23):
You want to be the guy with answers and solutions, not questions and problems.

I know a few mech's who don't get this: They have a problem and ask the sup "What do I do now?" Then the sup has to pull up a high chair and spoon-feed the info and instructions. If you run into a problem, your sup should be kept apprised of the situation, your future course of action, or your ideas to solve the problem. Think it through, nobody wants to lead somebody by the hand especially if they are paid the same as the rest of the staff. This is one of my largest pet peeves.
 
Dougloid
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Mon Jul 17, 2006 3:41 am

Quoting ReidYYZ (Reply 31):
Quoting Dougloid (Reply 23):
You want to be the guy with answers and solutions, not questions and problems.

I know a few mech's who don't get this: They have a problem and ask the sup "What do I do now?" Then the sup has to pull up a high chair and spoon-feed the info and instructions. If you run into a problem, your sup should be kept apprised of the situation, your future course of action, or your ideas to solve the problem. Think it through, nobody wants to lead somebody by the hand especially if they are paid the same as the rest of the staff. This is one of my largest pet peeves.

Well, part of that is doing the research to do the job. I'd never tackle a job without the maintenance manual sections describing the operation and the IPC showing the exploded assemblies right there on my rollaway.

If you must go to your boss with a problem, for heaven's sake have a solution in hand.
If you believe in coincidence, you haven't looked close enough-Joe Leaphorn
 
ReidYYZ
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Mon Jul 17, 2006 4:00 am

By:

Quoting ReidYYZ (Reply 31):
If you run into a problem,

It is assumed it is a result of the TSM not covering a specific situation, a function procedure not going according to AMM or just a snag not seen before. One should follow up with the proper documention, and ultimitly excersizing all your available resources before one goes to the Sup and have them do the leg work for you. Sorry if I was not clear enough.
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Mon Jul 17, 2006 4:05 am

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 32):

If you must go to your boss with a problem, for heaven's sake have a solution in hand.

Applies to any job. And even if your solution is wrong, the important part is to put in your best effort.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
cancidas
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Mon Jul 17, 2006 6:17 am

one thing i forgot. if you're in charge of deicing at your station, keep a bottle of hard liquor in your locker/ office. trust me on that one...
"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
 
MrChips
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Mon Jul 17, 2006 6:29 am

The best thing to clean and polish a polycarbonate windshield (such as those your average non-pressurized light aircraft) is not that expensive crap from Aeroshell or others - just get a can of Pledge furniture polish for a tenth the cost (you can get the lemon flavoured kind if you really want it). Not only does it clean and polish just as well as the expensive stuff does, but it also leaves a light waxy anti-static coating on the windshield, meaning it stays cleaner for longer periods of time AND it repels rain too.
Time...to un-pimp...ze auto!
 
scarebus03
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Mon Jul 17, 2006 6:53 am

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 22):
When reaching into the gap of a control surface during preflight to inspect hinges, nuts, etc, hold the control surface firmly in place with your other hand to prevent the wind or another person from chopping your finger off....

Just make sure it's not the gap of a hydraulically operated control surface you stick your finger in!  Wink


Brgds

SB03
No faults found......................
 
flymatt2bermud
Topic Author
Posts: 551
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2006 11:58 am

RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Mon Jul 17, 2006 1:17 pm

Quoting Scarebus03 (Reply 37):
Just make sure it's not the gap of a hydraulically operated control surface you stick your finger in!

Ouch!!
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
 
SFOMB67
Posts: 371
Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2005 1:20 pm

RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Mon Jul 17, 2006 2:47 pm

Quoting Midnights (Reply 11):
Also, a friend of mine gave his wife a small squirt bottle full of skydrol in place of mace or pepper spray and told her to shoot for the face and eyes....she hasn't had to use it but I know how well that could work, not too sure how leagle that is.

I knew a fellow at work that did the same, but he said you have to get "old, dirty skydrol" that's been in an aircraft hyd system, not new skydrol out of a can.

Quoting N8076U (Reply 28):
I think they made him a supervisor after that...

Reminds me of a supervisor at the base that made a w/u, signed it off, and bought it. He went on to become a Gen Mgr.
Not as easy as originally perceived
 
n8076u
Posts: 419
Joined: Mon Jun 19, 2006 10:52 am

RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Mon Jul 17, 2006 4:27 pm

Quoting Sfomb67 (Reply 39):
Reminds me of a supervisor at the base that made a w/u, signed it off, and bought it.

Just one supervisor?  Wink

Quoting Sfomb67 (Reply 39):
He went on to become a Gen Mgr.

Sadly, I know exactly who you mean.

Ah, the good old UAL days...

Chris
Don't blame me, I don't work here...
 
MesaMXORD
Posts: 176
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2006 2:05 am

RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Wed Jul 19, 2006 3:26 pm

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 23):
"Never get good at something you don't like, because you'll end up doing it forever."

AMEN To that. I changed a Stick Pusher Capstan on a Crj-700 in around half the time as the last person that did it. Next thing I know every day those were scheduled I got pulled off the line to sit all the way fwd in the little E/E bay for 2 hours multiple times!!! Never gonna do that again.

Clogged lav? Pressurize the plane and have the dump valve open.......... Makes a mess but then you dont have to got Brown trout fishing.
MESA - fighting common sense one day at a time
 
ilikeyyc
Posts: 1326
Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2003 8:09 am

RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Wed Jul 19, 2006 6:06 pm

Quoting MesaMXORD (Reply 41):
AMEN To that. I changed a Stick Pusher Capstan on a Crj-700 in around half the time as the last person that did it. Next thing I know every day those were scheduled I got pulled off the line to sit all the way fwd in the little E/E bay for 2 hours multiple times!!! Never gonna do that again.

I've done that same job. Just be thankful it wasn't a 200 as those are more difficult to change (so I have been told).

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 23):
Never get good at something you don't like, because you'll end up doing it forever.

Being one of three guys on my shift on my line that can fit into the CRJ fuel tanks means that I often get assigned the fuel tank mods.
Fighting Absurdity with Absurdity!
 
Dougloid
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Thu Jul 20, 2006 1:01 am

Quoting Ilikeyyc (Reply 42):
Quoting Dougloid (Reply 23):
Never get good at something you don't like, because you'll end up doing it forever.

Being one of three guys on my shift on my line that can fit into the CRJ fuel tanks means that I often get assigned the fuel tank mods.

Great Gawd almighty. Give your ass to Jesus, brother.

They gotta be the same as the Cl600/601, right? Football shaped panel just outboard of the wing root?

That was the main reason I quit working for Atlantic Aviation....there was a pretty extensive tank mod that they did back in the day. If the bird was not parked level the pressure refuel would just push fuel overboard thru the vents and when the asshole in the fuel truck looked up from his comic book and his sandwich a couple hundred gallons was on the ramp.
So Canadair came up with a fix which involved going in, swapping a lot of plumbing and drilling one of the stringers and installing some hilocks for some new sense valves.

Arms over the head. Up and in to the waist. Pull yourself up and in. Flip over on your back and shimmy forward as far as you could. Dark, smelly and dangerous.

When I found out that there were thirty or so Challengers on the west coast that needed mods, and as the junior facility we'd likely end up doing them all, I found another job.

However on the first one (Marie Callender's) Canadair sent a broad out from Windsor Locks to walk us thru it. She had a fine rack and it was better than a lap dance in a strip bar watching her go in.
If you believe in coincidence, you haven't looked close enough-Joe Leaphorn
 
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Starlionblue
Posts: 20472
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RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Thu Jul 20, 2006 3:09 am

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 43):

However on the first one (Marie Callender's) Canadair sent a broad out from Windsor Locks to walk us thru it. She had a fine rack and it was better than a lap dance in a strip bar watching her go in.

The unknown perks of aviation Big grin
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
ilikeyyc
Posts: 1326
Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2003 8:09 am

RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Thu Jul 20, 2006 4:03 am

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 43):
Great Gawd almighty. Give your ass to Jesus, brother.

They gotta be the same as the Cl600/601, right? Football shaped panel just outboard of the wing root?

Yeah its an oval shape just small enough to squeeze my fat torso on up there, put your arms over your head and shove yourself on up there. The only benefit to that job is because no one else can/wants to do it, they leave me alone and I can work at my own pace.

Knock on wood I haven't been in a 700 fuel tank, just the 200.

We had a woman that used to work the fuel tanks before I got here, but unlike your story, she looks like a guy.

edit:

let me also add that there is a center tank on the CRJ's. From your post, Dougloid, its sounds like there is no center tank on the Challengers.

[Edited 2006-07-19 21:29:55]

[Edited 2006-07-19 21:30:41]
Fighting Absurdity with Absurdity!
 
miamiair
Posts: 4249
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2004 9:42 pm

RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Thu Jul 20, 2006 8:21 pm

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 23):
Avoid the company of tattlers and teacher's pets. They'll try to screw you to make themselves look good.

Then again, there is "justice" for this category of people you work with:

Drill and install a zirk fitting in the offender's tool box, hook up the pneumatic grease gun and have at it. (Never done it, but I have seen it!)

Inject un-mixed resin into the drawer gaps and fill it up.

For those supervisors and managers that are pricks:
Inject their office with the two-part packing foam. Run like hell.

Had one guy in a crew that would take three trips to the crapper every day, for twenty minutes, right before break/lunch. Someone would go with a 2 X 4 and slap it outside the stall. The ensuing "BOOM" was sure to suck the turd back up his ass. Needless to say, he got toilet trained real quick.

And last but not least, we had a real practical joker in our crew that took offense to a hangar rat coming into our shop at break time and would smoke at our table. He had is own ash tray, so the joker one day added a small amount of gunpowder to the ashes...When the cigarette was placed in ash tray....FLASH...SMOKE...Guy fell out of his chair...never came back.

Tricks of the trade also involves dealing with schmucks like these.
Molon Labe - Proud member of SMASH
 
flymatt2bermud
Topic Author
Posts: 551
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2006 11:58 am

RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Thu Jul 20, 2006 8:57 pm

Quoting Miamiair (Reply 46):
we had a real practical joker in our crew that took offense to a hangar rat coming into our shop at break time and would smoke at our table. He had is own ash tray, so the joker one day added a small amount of gunpowder to the ashes...When the cigarette was placed in ash tray....FLASH...SMOKE...Guy fell out of his chair...never came back.

LOL Ouch! I nearly fell out of my chair when I read this one!! Good info MiamiAir!
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
 
Dougloid
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Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 2:44 am

RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Thu Jul 20, 2006 10:06 pm

Quoting Miamiair (Reply 46):
Tricks of the trade also involves dealing with schmucks like these.

There was a guy at Douglas who was 40 going on seventeen and he'd decided that we were all back in high school in gym class and he was going to make my life uninteresting.

So I knew he had a rollaway out on the flight ramp. One night I got a half gallon of blue lavatory concentrate that someone had left lying around, put a nipple on it, located his rollaway, found a hole in the back and discharged the entire contents into his toolbox.

After he'd cleaned it up I did it again to reinforce the point.

Ya know, there was another guy there, he was always blabbing about how he was going to call in AAFPRO and the FAA and close the place down because he thought some kind of bad shit was going on. This was the only time in life I ever threatened anyone.

I knew he lived on a boat and I knew it was over in Wilmington so in front of the crew I told him "Hank, I know where you live and I know what your boat looks like. If I lose my job because of you I will sink your fucking boat. Count on it." And I b'lieve I might have.
If you believe in coincidence, you haven't looked close enough-Joe Leaphorn
 
n8076u
Posts: 419
Joined: Mon Jun 19, 2006 10:52 am

RE: Tricks Of The Trade.

Fri Jul 21, 2006 4:44 am

Quoting Miamiair (Reply 46):
Then again, there is "justice" for this category of people you work with:

I've heard of the "fill toolbox with greasegun" trick, but haven't seen it myself.

The best one I've seen personally is when a guy's "dog" (pull-around smaller toolbox) was taken over to the overhead hoist, cabled to the hoist hook, and then the "up" and "deadman" buttons hoseclamped down, then the control head was slipped onto the hook as well. The toolbox and control head went up, up and away, and stopped when the hoist reached it's maximum up travel at the top of the wide-body hangar and must have been 80 or 90 feet above the ground. It took the guy a good hour of looking around before somebody mentioned that maybe his tools flew away, as a hint. When that didn't work, a more to-the-point individual told him that he should probably start pointing his eyes up rather than down in the search for his doggie. The look on his face was beyond priceless, as he finally spotted his box, swaying in the breeze.

I've also seen someone drill holes from the back of a guys toolbox, through the outer shell and through the back of each drawer. Then a long cherrymax was put through and pulled, thus preventing the drawers from opening.

We also had a prankster that made whistles out of tubing, and brazed an air fitting onto them. He would then freeze the whistle in a cup of water (to seal the whistle), and then take it out to the hangar and hook it up to an air fitting up high somewhere. After the ice melted, this whistle would go off (extremely loud with 90+ psi going through it), but he would be right there in the office, and act as surprised as everyone else. It took a while before we figured out it was him.  Wink
Don't blame me, I don't work here...

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