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express1
Topic Author
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Help With This Pic Pls

Wed Feb 28, 2007 1:14 am

C:My DocumentsMy PicturesDSC_0106.JPG

hello

While flying home from Rome on this Ryanair flight,i took this photo of the engine to this B738, and was wondering what is this peace of metal that is sticking out. I didn't want to start asking this questions while on board just in case it might worry the pax.

Any help on this would be greatfull.

cheers
dave
David.S cavanagh since 1961,if you can do better,then show me.
 
Spruit
Posts: 367
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2005 12:34 am

RE: Help With This Pic Pls

Wed Feb 28, 2007 1:22 am

Hi,

Maybe uploading the image to the servers would be helpful in your quest for answers  Smile

Spru!
E=Mc2
 
express1
Topic Author
Posts: 847
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RE: Help With This Pic Pls

Wed Feb 28, 2007 1:24 am

Quoting Spruit (Reply 1):

Opps it went to my profile

dave
David.S cavanagh since 1961,if you can do better,then show me.
 
LMP737
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RE: Help With This Pic Pls

Wed Feb 28, 2007 2:10 am

If you are talking about the fin looking device that's the vortex generator. It's purpose is to smooth the airflow going over the wing. Hope this helps.  Smile
Never take financial advice from co-workers.
 
express1
Topic Author
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Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 2:08 am

RE: Help With This Pic Pls

Wed Feb 28, 2007 2:12 am

Quoting LMP737 (Reply 3):

It did help, thanks a lot

dave
David.S cavanagh since 1961,if you can do better,then show me.
 
Fly2HMO
Posts: 7184
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RE: Help With This Pic Pls

Wed Feb 28, 2007 2:19 am

Quoting Express1 (Thread starter):
and was wondering what is this peace of metal that is sticking out.

If you look closely, 99% of all passenger planes with underwing engines have that little piece of metal sticking out. It only really is effective at high angles of attack.
 
KELPkid
Posts: 5247
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:33 am

RE: Help With This Pic Pls

Wed Feb 28, 2007 7:27 am

That would be a strake, who's purpose is to disrupt airflow durring certain flight regimes....if you ever fly on a 737 in high humidity conditions, you get a wonderful visualization of what it does to the airflow  Smile IIRC, at high angles of attack, it creates a nice high energy vortex that goes right over the top of the wing.
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HAWK21M
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RE: Help With This Pic Pls

Wed Feb 28, 2007 7:47 pm


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Rolf Wallner


Mounted on the Inboard side of the Cowl....Its a type of Vortex Generator.Called a Strake.
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
grandtheftaero
Posts: 247
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2003 1:05 pm

RE: Help With This Pic Pls

Thu Mar 01, 2007 3:14 am

More info from Dick Shevell's AIAA paper "Aerodynamic Bugs: Can CFD Spray Them Away"

"DC-10 wind tunnel tests showed a significant loss in maximum lift
coefficient in the flap deflected configurations, with landing slat
extension, compared to predictions. This resulted in a stall speed
increase of about 5 knots in the approach configuration. The initial
wing stall occured behind the nacelles and forward of the inboard
ailerons. The problem was traced by flow visualization techniques to the
effects of the nacelle wake at high angles of attack and the absence of
the slat in the vicinity of the nacelle pylons. The solution was
developed in the NASA Ames Research Center 12 ft. pressurized tunnel and
turned out to be a pair of strakes mounted forward on each side of the
nacelles in planes about 45 degrees above the horizontal. The final
strake shape was optimized in flight tests. The strakes are simply
large vortex generators. The vortices mix the nacelle boundary layer air
with the free stream and reduce the momentum loss in the wake. The
vortices then pass just over the upper surface of the wing, continuing
this mixing process. The counterrotating vortices also create a downwash
over the wing region unprotected by the slat, further reducing the
premature stall. The effect of the strakes is to reduce the required
takeoff and landing field lengths by about 6%, a very large effect."

http://www.aiaa.org/content.cfm?pageid=406&gTable=mtgpaper&gID=43846

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