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jetmech
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Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 08, 2008 10:46 am

G'Day team   ,

Although engineers are pretty much perfect, we have been known to make the odd slip up, shocking I know  . The pilots and ramp rats have fessed up, so it is only fair that we do as well.

The worst thing I did personally was rip a big long gash into the side of an A340-300 engine. I actually saw the stand make contact with the engine, but was sure the engine would deflect the stand with no damage. Unfortunately, the carbon fibre grabbed the edge of the stand wonderfully, and I proceeded to make the situation worse in my attempts to reverse the movement of the stand. The fact that this happened within half an hour of curfew made matters even worse.

I also was involved in an engine change on a JT9 where the sparkies left one of the cannon plugs attached. I discovered this minor anomaly when the engine was already a foot away from the strut. The damaged consisted of all the pins in the plug being pulled out of the back-shell. The fact it was the biggest plug with the most wires surely made the sparkies rue their earlier oversight! I have also being known to leave fan ties in engines when doing spins!

Other mishaps I have heard of have to do with apprentice engineers, so they can be forgiven. One apprentice "acquired" several quarts of MJ-II jet engine oil to put in his car. Unfortunately, jet engine oil is way too thin for car engines. The apprentice promptly discovered this when his engine seized up. Another apprentice was sent to check the mag plugs on a Rolls- Royce. Unfortunately, he managed to undo the oil drain plug on the gearbox, which promptly dumped its contents all over the tarmac.

So what other dumb things have fellow engineers done? I hope I'm not the only one!

Regards, JetMech

[Edited 2008-03-08 02:48:47]
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
Buzz
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 08, 2008 12:44 pm

G'day JetMech, Buzz here. I've seen a few screw ups, done a few. I can say that I've got more "off-road" time in a 737 than anybody else I know. About 10 years ago we were doing a high power run after tweaking the fuel control on #1 engine, had a mere pittance of fuel aboard (6k lbs), and was gracefully pushed off to the side of the taxiway.
No serious damage done, we had the airplane ready to fly in less than 3 hours. And I became "Buffoon of the Week". One of the day shift mechanics said the best words of encouragement after it was all done: "Some guys will never make that mistake. They're too busy sitting on their (lower body region). But you're out there trying to get things done all the time."

I know of a couple other guys who were towing a 727 to the gate about 20 years ago. They were in a hurry, accelerated out of the parking spot (all the ballast fuel sloshed aft), turned sharply to get on the taxi-line. The airplane nose was skipping as it made the turn... when he slowed a bit the airplane started to pass the tug on the left (towbar still hooked up) so Paul romped on the brakes. The towbar folded into a V shape and the side of the airplane smacked into the side of the tug. Not a lot of damage, a dent and a crack in a stringer.

Hmmm, replacing a 767 forward galley chiller, bolt holes in the bottom don't quite line up... spend an hour trying to get all 4 bolts to engage... slide it back and forth a lot... ZORCH! I was scraping the insulation off a nearby wire bundle.
That airplane had EICAS disagree messages for a long time.

I can say that I've learned from a few expensive lessons. Other mechanics wonder how I became "Teflon Plated". When the brown stuff hits the fan, it doesn't stick to me.

g'day
 
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jetmech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 08, 2008 2:09 pm



Quoting Buzz (Reply 1):

Nice work Buzz, the old teflon shoulders come in use all the time!

I actually thought of a few more dumb moves made whilst I was an engineer.

We were fitting tank access panels to a 747 on night. For some reason, everyone thought that the mesh gasket was the actual sealing element. The mesh gasket is actually for bonding the panel to the wing skin, and it goes between the clamp ring and wing skin. Because we thought it did the sealing, we were putting it between the panel and the wing skin. Lucky enough, the leading hand caught the mistake before we put fuel on!

Another night we were doing tank work, where we had to do some work on the piping going through #4 wing tank of a 747. For some reason, no one realised that the reserve tank had fuel in it. We soon found out when we undid some pipes, only to have fuel flood into #4 wing tank and out the access hole onto the hangar floor!

Possibly the most dangerous one I head of was attributable to a crew that I had once worked with. These guys were a 767 heavy maintenance crew, who were helping out on the 747 line one day. They where tasked with removing a 747 body landing gear. All the preliminary work was done, all that remained was to lower the trunnion from it's fittings and wheel the gear away. For some reason, they could not get the trunnion to drop.

Their solution to the problem was to pump up the strut with a few thousand psi of nitrogen in an attempt to loosen the trunnion. What they forgot was that the drag brace was already removed. They merrily kept pumping in nitrogen until the inevitable happened. Once there was a huge amount of pressure in the strut - and due to the missing drag brace - it forcefully kicked forward with a huge bang. Luckily, no one was killed, but quite a bit of damage was done to the surrounding maintenance stands.

Regards, JetMech
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
ex52tech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 08, 2008 4:26 pm



Quoting JetMech (Thread starter):
Although engineers are pretty much perfect, we have been known to make the odd slip up, shocking I know

When you said engineer, I thought you meant actual engineers, Took a paragraph to realize that you mean mechanic.

Well..........yeah.......I have pull one or two stunts over the years. I was filling in for an absent lead mechanic, and ended up helping a crew that was unfamiliar with the DC-10 (757 heavy check mechanics) install a new thrust reverser assembly on a DC-10-30 one evening, and with the work load at the time, running between two airplanes I neglected to see the aft cowling that was installed on the inboard side of the engine on the hold open rods. The outboard aft cowl was on the floor.........well anyway........I had one of the guys deploy the reverser at which time the transalating sleve deployed right into the open cowl. I was standing on the outboard side of the engine, and just didn't see the aft cowl. Folded the aft edge of the translating sleve over, and the leading edge of the aft cowl, broke one of the jackscrews, which flailed around and tore up alot of sheet metal.  guilty 

We removed that new reverser assy. and put it right back in the box, and I was looking for a rock to hide under, but the manager was good about it......I got that "Well if you were doing nothing it wouldn't have happened". I heard about it from the other guys for a long time, but I deserved the ribbing.

Pulled an oil pump out of a JT9 one night, without draining the oil tank........forgot ......no check valve. Got 10+ gallons of oil all over the floor. 10 gallons of 2380 makes a big puddle. Had an audience while I was spredding out the speed dry, but no help........nice bunch of guys.

Then there is always the "get the new guy to pull the CSD out of the JT8, and don't tell him to drain the wet spline" trick. I learned working on J57's you always get out of the way when you pull any component out of the gear box. So that trick didn't work. But it was fun doing it to someone else.
"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
 
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jetmech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 08, 2008 5:43 pm



Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 3):
had one of the guys deploy the reverser at which time the transalating sleve deployed right into the open cowl. I was standing on the outboard side of the engine, and just didn't see the aft cowl.

I have seen this one almost happen on a few occasions!

Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 3):
Pulled an oil pump out of a JT9 one night, without draining the oil tank........forgot ......no check valve. Got 10+ gallons of oil all over the floor. 10 gallons of 2380 makes a big puddle. Had an audience while I was spredding out the speed dry, but no help........nice bunch of guys.

I remember that we used to do a check on the main oil pumps of the JT9D-7R4E. This involved removing the pump cartridge from the gear box, and making several measurements across the teeth of the driving gear with a special micrometer to determine the tooth wear.

The pump cartridge is round, so you can put it back into the gearbox in one of 4 positions. Several times, the pump was replaced in the wrong position, such that the two gears driving the pump were not in mesh. You only discovered this when you went to spin the engine and got zero oil pressure!

Another good one came to us courtesy of the Boeing company itself. We had to replace a structural element which was part of one of the wing to fuselage attachments on a 747 classic. This structural piece was about 8 inchs wide, and 4 foot in length, with hundreds of holes and various thickness all over the place. It was also curved along its length to conform to the fuselage shape. The sheeties went to fit the replacement part, which was perfect in every sense except for one small detail. This small oversight was that it was curved in the precisely the wrong direction! Definitely a part made early on a Monday or late on a Friday!

Regards, JetMech
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
2H4
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 08, 2008 6:13 pm



Quoting JetMech (Reply 4):
perfect in every sense except for one small detail. This small oversight was that it was curved in the precisely the wrong direction!

Could it have been the part for the other side of the fuselage?

2H4
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jetmech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 08, 2008 6:37 pm



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 5):
Could it have been the part for the other side of the fuselage?

I don't think so, because although the profile, curvature and hole locations may have been mirror images, the thickness variations throughout this particular part were not. In other words, the profile, holes and curvature could fit on the other side of the fuselage, but the thickness variations were mirrored "incorrectly", which would have prevented fitment.

Regards, JetMech
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
2H4
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 08, 2008 6:40 pm



Quoting JetMech (Reply 6):

Blast. Thought I had it all figured out.

2H4
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jetmech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 08, 2008 6:51 pm



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 7):
Blast. Thought I had it all figured out.

I just had a think about it, and realised that the part would have come without the holes drilled. Because of the number of holes, and the various diameters and locations, you would dummy fit the part first and then drill the holes.

Nonetheless, of the three unique elements making up the part, namely the profile, curvature and thickness variations, one of these elements was not mirrored correctly to allow fitment to the other side of the fuselage. This happened to be the thickness variations.

Regards, JetMech
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
SFOMB67
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 09, 2008 4:02 am

Here's one I have seen several times. 767 C-Ck line. Run the inbd slats down on an open T/R. Usually causes delam on the reverser.
Not as easy as originally perceived
 
tdscanuck
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 09, 2008 5:15 am



Quoting Sfomb67 (Reply 9):
767 C-Ck line. Run the inbd slats down on an open T/R. Usually causes delam on the reverser.

There was a 737NG stuck on the ground for this very problem yesterday.

Tom.
 
ex52tech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:05 am

Now I haven't done this, but I have witnessed it a few times. Someone will pull a fuel boost pump out of the tank on a DC10, and actually trust the check valve to close off so the tank doesn't drain itself on the ground. You can never get that pump back into the socket once the fuel starts gushing out.
"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
 
2H4
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:18 am

I was preflighting a 152 some years ago that had just come out of a 100-hour inspection.

When it came time to check the oil, I had trouble spotting the oil level on the dipstick. I could make out a slight line of oil on it, but the oil was so new and clean, it was difficult to discern exactly where the oil level was.

I headed inside and grabbed an instructor, who examined it and assured me the oil level was acceptable.

I wasn't satisfied, so I got a senior instructor. This guy said the same thing, and showed me how to run my finger along the dipstick to feel where the oil level was. He explained that the oil was so nice and clean, the level had to be detected by feel, rather than by sight.

I still wasn't satisfied, so I returned the aircraft's keys and paperwork, and started checking out a different aircraft. I had to redo all the paperwork, shuffle the schedule a bit, and start the preflight from scratch, but as far as I was concerned, I wasn't going to fly an aircraft if I wasn't 100% sure about the oil level.

So I went out on my flight, taking a friend up for her first-ever airplane ride. We had a great time, and spent about an hour sightseeing and having fun.

After taxiing up to the fuel pump and shutting down, the senior CFI approached me and congratulated me on making the call to reject the first airplane. Apparently, the mechanic had forgotten to add new oil to the engine after draining the old oil, so the engine was, in fact, bone dry.

2H4
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ReidYYZ
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:59 am

Here's mine:

Having just done a post A-check engine run on a RB211-535E4 equipped 752 and clearing out of the flight deck, an Avionics asked if I could run the reverser back and forth for him. I glanced out and looked, there was only the C-duct latches access panel still open from someone checking the chip detector and gone into the hangar to get lockwire for it. So I ran it back, no problem. Running it forward is another thing. The access panel, when the T/R ran back just rode the lip of the T/R sleeve in some sort of cam action. When I went to stow, the access panel- now open and in the way of the sleeve lip just cut through the Honeycomb sleeve lip like a hot knife through butter. Not knowing this, after coming down stairs and approching the engine to check on the lockwire status, found this chunk of aluminum honeycomb lying on the ground. With the long walk of shame back into the hangar to tell the supervisor, I had to find the tractor and pull the aircraft back in for sheetmetal to repair the sleeve. They hated me for a while.

Lesson learned: Don't do anything for Avionics!
 
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jetmech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 09, 2008 9:43 am



Quoting Sfomb67 (Reply 9):
Run the inbd slats down on an open T/R. Usually causes delam on the reverser.

We had a lockout tool to prevent this exact occurrence. Problem was, people started burning out slat motors when they attempted to extend the slats with the tool still fitted  boggled  .

Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 11):
Someone will pull a fuel boost pump out of the tank on a DC10, and actually trust the check valve to close off so the tank doesn't drain itself on the ground.

Is there a drain valve on the back of DC-10 boost pumps to check if the valve has in fact shutoff the fuel?

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 12):
Apparently, the mechanic had forgotten to add new oil to the engine after draining the old oil, so the engine was, in fact, bone dry.

And Murphy's law says the engine would have seized up just as you left the ground!

Quoting ReidYYZ (Reply 13):
Lesson learned: Don't do anything for Avionics!

It's amazing how quickly the coneheads scatter when a job involves heavy lifting, dirt or excessive physical effort! My favourite one is having to lug IDG's in and out for them, even though it is very much an electrical component.

Regards, JetMech
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
Buzz
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 09, 2008 11:35 am

Hi JetMech, ExB52Tech, 2H4 : Buzz here. I noticed something... slow on the uptake sometimes. The post about "pilots doing dumb things" is significantly larger than the post about Mechanic's Mistakes.

That could start a flame war! But we'll act professionally on this one (grin)

g'day
 
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jetmech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 09, 2008 11:53 am



Quoting Buzz (Reply 15):
That could start a flame war! But we'll act professionally on this one (grin)

Given pilot's egos the number of their mistakes is sure to be even higher than what it appears  Wink! They wouldn't even get the opportunity to do dumb things unless we did our job perfectly in the first place Smile!

In all seriousness, I have maximum respect for pilots and the awesome responsibility they shoulder, management on the other hand Angry.

Quoting Buzz (Reply 15):
The post about "pilots doing dumb things" is significantly larger than the post about Mechanic's Mistakes.

Flame war, flame war, flame war duck !

Regards, JetMech
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
2H4
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:44 pm



Quoting Buzz (Reply 15):
Hi JetMech, ExB52Tech, 2H4 : Buzz here. I noticed something... slow on the uptake sometimes. The post about "pilots doing dumb things" is significantly larger than the post about Mechanic's Mistakes.

They all (predictably) pale in comparison to the thread awhile back that focused on passengers doing dumb things.  yes 

2H4
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wirelock
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 09, 2008 5:43 pm

i know of a mechanic that drove a mobile air source away while it was till connected to a B767(which was in a hangar at the time). it was very lucky somebody wasn't injured.
 
WrenchBender
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Mon Mar 10, 2008 2:57 pm

A couple of military ones-
I did full retraction tests on a CH124 Sea King at sea on board an AOR tanker. Very stupid  Smile

A friend who did retraction tests on a T33 T-Bird using the Engine as a power source.  Silly

Pulled the Chip Detector on CH124 Main Gear Box and dumped 44 quarts of oil on to the 2 crew sensor stations. The Fraggle techs hated me for that one.

WrenchBender
Silly Pilot, Tricks are for kids.......
 
LMP737
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Mon Mar 10, 2008 10:51 pm

Some years ago I was doing a CSD/GEN change on an MD-80. A voice in the back of my head told me I was forgetting something. Of course I dismissed that voice and went about my work. As soon as I started to pull the CSD off the gearbox I remembered very quickly what I forgot. That's because all the oil in the wet spline between the CSD and gearbox dumped all over me.
Never take financial advice from co-workers.
 
ex52tech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Tue Mar 11, 2008 3:22 am



Quoting JetMech (Reply 14):
Is there a drain valve on the back of DC-10 boost pumps to check if the valve has in fact shutoff the fuel?

Yes there is, and you can drain the pump housing, but it is like trusting a politician. People have trusted that check valve, only to rotate the pump that last quarter turn, pull the pump out the rest of the way, and here comes the fuel.

Quoting Buzz (Reply 15):
The post about "pilots doing dumb things" is significantly larger than the post about Mechanic's Mistakes

Probably has a lot to do with mechanics not wanting to admit their mistakes. Yes we can be somewhat arrogant.

I have told more than one (deserving) pilot, on an ego trip, that the only people that they will meet that are more arrogant than a pilot...........Surgeons, and aircraft mechanics. Subtle way to pop ones baloon.
"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
 
greasespot
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Tue Mar 11, 2008 3:45 am

Lets see...the memorable ones...Broke the chip detector off on a CSD 10 mins before departure. Removed a CSD and forgot about the wet splin....It was not 10 gallons of 2380 but it was about 5 liters on my partner...

Had a powercard jump off the hitch and go through a hangar door...Burned out 4 DME'sboxes in a row because i forgot to pull the right cct's breaker..

Dumped a lav full of cooked poo(been sitting in the heat for a week, all over the ramp.....I ended up getting a fire hose out to wash it away...

Those are the ones that stick out....

Gs
Sometimes all you can do is look them in the eye and ask " how much did your mom drink when she was pregnant with you?"
 
tdscanuck
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Tue Mar 11, 2008 4:47 am



Quoting Greasespot (Reply 22):
Burned out 4 DME'sboxes in a row because i forgot to pull the right cct's breaker..

I didn't do the deed, but I once had to develop the troubleshooting list for a 737 that had had 115VAC connected to one of the 28 VDC buses. Many many fried black boxes that day.

Tom.
 
S5LineATL
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Tue Mar 11, 2008 5:20 am

Ahhh such wonderful stories...... My personal best

First day on the floor in the engine shop, doing a QEC buildup on a freshly overhauled CF6-50. I was putting on the HP bleed valve and didn't pay attention to the fact that all the borescope plugs were still removed for inspection. Those that have done a borescope on a CF6 are probably familiar with the plugs that are inside the " Y " duct on the right hand side of the engine. Well as I was hastily trying to get the valves installed I dropped a bolt down inside the Y duct and wouldn't you know it, I pulled off a one in a million shot as the bolt went into the open plug hole. All I herd was a sound similar to the game show plinko as the bolt found it's way deep inside this very expensive piece of aerospace machinery. I thought I was fired.... luckily for me my boss just gave me hell as he was laughing quite loudly at my misfortune. I spent the next 8 hours learning how to use a borescope and finding out that I knew more cuss words in various combinations than I thought.

Man I love my job.
Mongo only pawn in game of life.
 
NKP S2
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Tue Mar 11, 2008 4:58 pm



Quoting ReidYYZ (Reply 13):



Quoting ReidYYZ (Reply 13):

Having just done a post A-check engine run on a RB211-535E4 equipped 752 and clearing out of the flight deck, an Avionics asked if I could run the reverser back and forth for him. I glanced out and looked, there was only the C-duct latches access panel still open from someone checking the chip detector and gone into the hangar to get lockwire for it. So I ran it back, no problem. Running it forward is another thing. The access panel, when the T/R ran back just rode the lip of the T/R sleeve in some sort of cam action. When I went to stow, the access panel- now open and in the way of the sleeve lip just cut through the Honeycomb sleeve lip like a hot knife through butter. Not knowing this, after coming down stairs and approching the engine to check on the lockwire status, found this chunk of aluminum honeycomb lying on the ground. With the long walk of shame back into the hangar to tell the supervisor, I had to find the tractor and pull the aircraft back in for sheetmetal to repair the sleeve. They hated me for a while.

Oh yeah, I was a party to that as well. Was working a 757 T/R problem and it was getting late toward the end of the shift ( dark on the ramp by then ) and we just got everything rigged, and instead of heading in to give a turn-over to the next shift, me and my work partner were eager to do an ops check as we wanted to see the fruits of our labor. The fwd latch access was of the "scoop" type and appeared to be hanging open vertically...out of the translating cowls path. I ran up to the cockpit and my partner stayed at the engine to watch and keep people clear. I popped the T/R but did not see the EICAS msg go from amber to green...then it finally did...just then I see my partner frantically signalling me from in front of the A/C and then threw his hat on the ground with a very resigned/disgusted expression on his face. A gust of wind just then blew the scooped door into the T/R's path and sliced through the bottom of the translating sleeve just as you noted. It all happened because we were in a rush to get a good ops check, and didn't want to waste even a minute re-latching the access door. Some of our 757's use the flat, non-scooped door and so this is/was never an issue. We've modded the scooped doors with a cable lanyard restricting the door travel. It works, but it makes C-duct latch access and chip detector access a major pain in the ass now.

Regarding the damage: It was mitigated by 2 lucky factors:

1) That very translating sleeve just happened to already be scheduled for a replacement due to a temporary composite repair from another issue. Lucky for us.

2) They were glad we repaired a long chronic T/R indication / synch lock issue.

Nothing more was said. Of course we all worked together for years and know each other well, and so the supervisor at the time knew what not to say
 
Tristarsteve
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Tue Mar 11, 2008 5:46 pm

My nbr one of all time was about 30 years ago on a B737-200.
We had to replace a Ground Spoiler Selector Valve. This was in the right wheel well and was actuated by a teleflex cable from the torque links, so that when the torque links compressed, the valve opened and the ground spoilers came out.
But this same teleflex cable also provides ground sensing. In fact the ground sense microswitches and the ground spoiler selector valve are in the same fitting. In those days I was a supervisor and had unlicensed mechanics. It seemed a very simple job so I sent my mech out to do it. No problems he reported, and when I inspected it I failed to see the elongated bolt holes that were there for adjustment.
So off it went, unable to retract the undercarriage, returned. We immediately reallised our mistake and the hangar foreman was up the ramp, and had the teleflex cable in pieces and was greasing it up before Quality arrived. No one else ever knew!
 
ex52tech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Wed Mar 12, 2008 12:39 am



Quoting S5LineATL (Reply 24):
Those that have done a borescope on a CF6 are probably familiar with the plugs that are inside the " Y " duct on the right hand side of the engine. Well as I was hastily trying to get the valves installed I dropped a bolt down inside the Y duct and wouldn't you know it, I pulled off a one in a million shot as the bolt went into the open plug hole. All I herd was a sound similar to the game show plinko as the bolt found it's way deep inside this very expensive piece of aerospace machinery.

Know those two plugs well.

The CF6 shop I worked in, we built the engines vertically, so it was a common event to drop hardware in an engine. We would pick the engine up with a crane, slowly rotate the compressor, and listen for the "plinko" effect until the bolt fell out. If the hardware was in the hot section we would remove the fuel nozzles closest to where the hardware ended up, get the borescope out, and the mechanical fingers. Happened all the time.
"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Wed Mar 12, 2008 9:33 am

It feels bad when one notices a step trestle just below the Galley service door of a B737 on Jacks being lowered & ones yell & run towards the erring engineer is just too late & the door is pushed out of shape.Damn.

Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 27):
The CF6 shop I worked in, we built the engines vertically, so it was a common event to drop hardware in an engine. We would pick the engine up with a crane, slowly rotate the compressor, and listen for the "plinko" effect until the bolt fell out. If the hardware was in the hot section we would remove the fuel nozzles closest to where the hardware ended up, get the borescope out, and the mechanical fingers. Happened all the time.

Are you serious about theTilting of the Engine by a crane part  Smile
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
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jetmech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Wed Mar 12, 2008 6:27 pm



Quoting Wirelock (Reply 18):
i know of a mechanic that drove a mobile air source away while it was till connected to a B767(which was in a hangar at the time). it was very lucky somebody wasn't injured.

That's a common one. One of the mechanics I work with drove away a GPU whilst the cord was still attached. Another person managed to once wedge a work van under one of the outboard engines on a 747.

Quoting WrenchBender (Reply 19):
Pulled the Chip Detector on CH124 Main Gear Box and dumped 44 quarts of oil on to the 2 crew sensor stations.

Was there no oil shutoff mechanism inside the MCD holder?

Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 21):
People have trusted that check valve, only to rotate the pump that last quarter turn, pull the pump out the rest of the way, and here comes the fuel.

It sounds like DC-10 boost pumps are a combination of the 747 and 767 design, in that there is a check valve like the 747, but also some additional mechanism to shut off fuel due to the required "twist", which is similar to the fuel shut off sleeve of the 767.

Quoting Greasespot (Reply 22):
Dumped a lav full of cooked poo

Lovely! I was once witness to the dumping of "fresh" poo on the tarmac. Strangely, you actually could not smell it until you where quite close, and even then it was not too bad. I'm sure a week of high heat would fix that though!

Quoting NKP S2 (Reply 25):
Of course we all worked together for years and know each other well, and so the supervisor at the time knew what not to say

Supervisors themselves are sure to have made mistakes on occasion. It's nice when they remember that fact and keep things in perspective when you slip up.

Quoting S5LineATL (Reply 24):



Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 27):

Had a similar occurrence on an APU once. Boro'ing the APU required one to manually spin the engine to see all the blades. This was done using a 3/8" (or 1/2", not sure) square drive extension. Unfortunately, this extension had one of those spring loaded socket retention features on the square end. Lo and behold, the boys could not remove the extension from the APU, and they thus had to do an APU change  Sad !

Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 26):
So off it went, unable to retract the undercarriage, returned.

Was that because the aircraft still thought is was on the ground due to the neglected adjustment of the fitting?

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 28):
It feels bad when one notices a step trestle just below the Galley service door of a B737 on Jacks being lowered & ones yell & run towards the erring engineer is just too late & the door is pushed out of shape.Damn.

This also happened in the hangar many times, where roof mounted platforms where driven down onto open passenger doors.

Regards, JetMech
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
WrenchBender
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Wed Mar 12, 2008 6:52 pm



Quoting JetMech (Reply 29):
Was there no oil shutoff mechanism inside the MCD holder?

Rotating sleeve type. It came out with the detector, which is approx 2" in dia with it's screen, and the oil was hot about 15 minutes after shutdown.

WrenchBender
Silly Pilot, Tricks are for kids.......
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Wed Mar 12, 2008 9:56 pm



Quoting JetMech (Reply 29):
This also happened in the hangar many times, where roof mounted platforms where driven down onto open passenger doors

The catering trucks out here are culprit often.
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
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BreninTW
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Thu Mar 13, 2008 1:09 am



Quoting JetMech (Reply 29):
Lovely! I was once witness to the dumping of "fresh" poo on the tarmac. Strangely, you actually could not smell it until you where quite close, and even then it was not too bad. I'm sure a week of high heat would fix that though!

31 hours will do it! My first flight to Taipei was on MH, and we were on an MD-11. The plane went tech, and we were delayed 31 hours. In that time, the plane wasn't serviced (or serviced properly) -- JNB was probably on strike or something. The routing was the infamous EZE - CPT - JNB - KUL route ...

After 31 hours of sitting in the JNB summer sun, that plane was *VERY* aromatic when we finally boarded for the flight. Thankfully, two glasses of wine and a sleeping pill took care of that for the rest of the flight.
 
LMP737
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Fri Mar 14, 2008 4:00 am



Quoting NKP S2 (Reply 25):
Oh yeah, I was a party to that as well. Was working a 757 T/R problem and it was getting late toward the end of the shift ( dark on the ramp by then ) and we just got everything rigged, and instead of heading in to give a turn-over to the next shift, me and my work partner were eager to do an ops check as we wanted to see the fruits of our labor. The fwd latch access was of the "scoop" type and appeared to be hanging open vertically...out of the translating cowls path. I ran up to the cockpit and my partner stayed at the engine to watch and keep people clear. I popped the T/R but did not see the EICAS msg go from amber to green...then it finally did...just then I see my partner frantically signalling me from in front of the A/C and then threw his hat on the ground with a very resigned/disgusted expression on his face. A gust of wind just then blew the scooped door into the T/R's path and sliced through the bottom of the translating sleeve just as you noted. It all happened because we were in a rush to get a good ops check, and didn't want to waste even a minute re-latching the access door. Some of our 757's use the flat, non-scooped door and so this is/was never an issue. We've modded the scooped doors with a cable lanyard restricting the door travel. It works, but it makes C-duct latch access and chip detector access a major pain in the ass now.

AA had a rash of TR damage some years back due to that panel coming open. The fix ended up being putting a latch on the leading edge of the panel.
Never take financial advice from co-workers.
 
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jetmech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Fri Mar 14, 2008 5:17 am

I wonder if anyone can relate to an engineer similar to what I am about to describe.

Anyhow, this particular engineer has a pathological aversion to blank Tech Log pages. Even if an aircraft comes into on a transit with nil defects, he has to find at least a few other things to enter into the Tech Log. I think his best effort was filling three or four whole Tech Log pages on an aircraft that come in nil defects! Keep in mind each page has space for four separate snags  eyebrow .

As you can imagine, most of the snags are for really minor detail items, that have absolutely no bearing of the serviceability of the aircraft. His favourite is missing screw caps on the bleed screws of brake units, and stuff like missing decals in the toilets and galleys. He also seems to go nuts over small pieces of plastic trim on the passenger seats

Apparently, Airbus apply small reflective triangular stickers to the outside of the fuselage sections. Lasers are shone on these reflective triangles to align the fuselage sections at the factory during assembly. This particular engineer snagged a few of these stickers as missing on one occasion. The fact that the fuselage was already firmly bolted together and unable to be readjusted seemed to totally escape him  Yeah sure .

Regards, JetMech
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
wirelock
Posts: 98
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Fri Mar 14, 2008 9:57 am



Quoting JetMech (Reply 34):
Apparently, Airbus apply small reflective triangular stickers to the outside of the fuselage sections. Lasers are shone on these reflective triangles to align the fuselage sections at the factory during assembly. This particular engineer snagged a few of these stickers as missing on one occasion. The fact that the fuselage was already firmly bolted together and unable to be readjusted seemed to totally escape him

hey jetmech,
these stickers are markers for the aircraft body water line. they are handy for finding position (ie stringer number) for assessing structural damages (they are located between stringer 19/20).
as you know they have no affect on the aircraft flying...
i know what u mean about having a guy like this but its better than having a lazy guy .... and we both know those type of engineers are out there too.
 
MD11Engineer
Posts: 13899
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Fri Mar 14, 2008 12:22 pm



Quoting Wirelock (Reply 35):
Quoting JetMech (Reply 34):
Apparently, Airbus apply small reflective triangular stickers to the outside of the fuselage sections. Lasers are shone on these reflective triangles to align the fuselage sections at the factory during assembly. This particular engineer snagged a few of these stickers as missing on one occasion. The fact that the fuselage was already firmly bolted together and unable to be readjusted seemed to totally escape him

hey jetmech,
these stickers are markers for the aircraft body water line. they are handy for finding position (ie stringer number) for assessing structural damages (they are located between stringer 19/20).
as you know they have no affect on the aircraft flying...
i know what u mean about having a guy like this but its better than having a lazy guy .... and we both know those type of engineers are out there too.

You might need those stickers if the aircraft had a prang and you want to check if something got distorted (like the LH A320 last week).

BTW, I also know the kind of engineer, who writes up loads of bullsh*t snags, but I also hate those guys who have an aversion to writing and never do proper handover sheets or leave the booking in and out of spare parts from stores to the next shift.

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
miamiair
Posts: 4249
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Fri Mar 14, 2008 12:26 pm

A shift supervisor was jacking a 707in the hangar for a gear swing. He was not "supervising properly as the tail jack was not following the ascent in unison with the nose and wings. The tech on the tail was busy looking at the females coming back from lunch. I walked into the hangar as the 707s tail dropped to the hangar floor with a crunch. The tail jack had gouged the aft fuselage and poked a good hole through the horizontal stab. Luckily no one was injured. The lower aft fuselage was crushed requiring circumferential/stringers/skin repairs. One wing tip had snapped down on to a rack unit and damaged it too. Job security for the tin-peckers. Human factors>distractions...
Molon Labe - Proud member of SMASH
 
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jetmech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 15, 2008 12:00 am



Quoting Wirelock (Reply 35):
i know what u mean about having a guy like this but its better than having a lazy guy



Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 36):
BTW, I also know the kind of engineer, who writes up loads of bullsh*t snags, but I also hate those guys who have an aversion to writing and never do proper handover sheets or leave the booking in and out of spare parts from stores to the next shift.

It's very true what you both say. Despite all his peculiarities and at times, titanic personality, this particular engineer is definitely the one you want to be working with when the s*** hits the fan. Although I am not a real fan of lazy engineers either, the ones that really get under my skin are the blase" ones, and those who's only priority is to do the job as quickly as possible.

One mechanic I used to work with was very blase", in that he never bothered to do stuff like ensuring safety devices where fitted or checking C/B's for deactivation before doing jobs. He always assumed someone else had done it as part of the check. This caught him out one night when he was in the cockpit doing a wet spin after a FFR change on a RR D4.

Lo and behold, the engine fired up as the igniter plug C/B's were still in. This guy made a whole lot of excuses, saying that he did check the C/B's, and that someone in the cockpit must have bumped the igniter plug C/B's back in, but we all knew he did not bother to check them in the first place.

Another engineers sole objective was to do the job as quick as humanly possibly so we could then sit in the smoko room for the rest of the night. This guy really got on my nerves. We had to change a boost pump housing on a 747 one night due to leakage. This guy was so keen to finish the job, he would not allow us to call a fuel tanker to fill the tank for a leak check! On top of it all, this guy always whinged incessantly for the entire shift

Quoting Miamiair (Reply 37):
The tech on the tail was busy looking at the females coming back from lunch.

Ah yes, rue the female that was brave or foolish enough to walk onto the Jetbase! It was amazing how all these responsible middle aged family men suddenly turned into pre-pubescent boys at the mere sight of a female.

Quoting Miamiair (Reply 37):
A shift supervisor was jacking a 707in the hangar for a gear swing.

My scare experience working on the 707 came when we where removing the fin. This was done by knocking out the four taper bolts, and fitting smaller, temporary bolts to the fittings on one side. The fin was then winched down to the horizontal hinging around the temporary bolts, and then lifted off with a crane.

The fitting from the winch bolted to the fin with a swivel mechanism. Once the fin was past a certain angle, the swivel would twist, and the whole fin would suddenly drop a short distance. Scared the crap out of me, but got a good laugh out of all the older engineers as they knew it was coming.

Regards, JetMech
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
FredT
Posts: 2166
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 15, 2008 8:45 am



Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 3):
When you said engineer, I thought you meant actual engineers,

We never screw up.

However, there are times at which the world is not up to specification...  Wink
I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
 
ex52tech
Posts: 553
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 15, 2008 4:36 pm



Quoting FredT (Reply 39):
We never screw up.

You mean like the guys that designed the Comet 1.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 28):
Are you serious about theTilting of the Engine by a crane part

You bet.............. If the engine was being built it was standing on its nose, and if you wanted to pick it up you attached a fixture to the rear case, and then you could lift it with a hoist, when it came time to set the engine in a trailer, we would attach a fitting to the forward engine mount, attach a hoist to that and a hoist to the rear fixture, then lift the front hoist, and lower the aft hoist until the engine was horizontal.

When the engine was on its nose, it was sitting on a wheeled stand we called a skateboard. You could move it around fairly easily, but you had to be careful not to do any sudden moves, the engine could tip over if you ran over a bolt, or nut, and the skateboard stopped suddenly, at least that was the theory.......didn't want to find out the hard way if it would tip over or not.
"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
 
FredT
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sat Mar 15, 2008 8:03 pm



Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 40):

Quoting FredT (Reply 39):
We never screw up.

You mean like the guys that designed the Comet 1.



Quoting FredT (Reply 39):
However, there are times at which the world is not up to specification... Wink

Egg-zactly. Nothing in the specs about metal fatigue, and yet the metal fatigued. Darn metal never read the specs, completely unacceptable!

"When the real world and the map do not agree, what do you do? Call in the combat engineers..."  Wink

(Just in case anyone missed it: Completely tongue-in-cheek)
I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
 
ex52tech
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 16, 2008 5:36 am



Quoting FredT (Reply 41):

(Just in case anyone missed it: Completely tongue-in-cheek)

I didn't miss it..........I just could not resist, and I saw where you were from, so I picked the Comet.  Big grin
"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 16, 2008 6:56 am



Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 40):
You bet..............

Interesting.

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 36):
BTW, I also know the kind of engineer, who writes up loads of bullsh*t snags, but I also hate those guys who have an aversion to writing and never do proper handover sheets or leave the booking in and out of spare parts from stores to the next shift.

Also the Folks from the previous night shift not changing that worn tire or brake assy & forcing the morning shift guys to do that in line Mx distrupting a scheduled flight.

regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
LMP737
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 16, 2008 4:04 pm



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 43):
Also the Folks from the previous night shift not changing that worn tire or brake assy & forcing the morning shift guys to do that in line Mx distrupting a scheduled flight.

That will usually get you a metting with your manager.
Never take financial advice from co-workers.
 
ex52tech
Posts: 553
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 2:28 pm

RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 16, 2008 6:50 pm



Quoting LMP737 (Reply 44):
That will usually get you a metting with your manager

Only if you tell him.......and then what happens. I have seen tool boxes with pneumatic grease guns attached, and the trigger zip-tied on. Not something I would do, but it has been done.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 43):
Also the Folks from the previous night shift not changing that worn tire or brake assy & forcing the morning shift guys to do that in line Mx distrupting a scheduled flight

Used to have another airlines 727 come through our gates every morning. Their tire, and bake wear limits were different from ours, this was a code sharing (partner) airline. So I changed many a tire, and occasional brake, that was out of our limits, but not theirs.
"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
 
wirelock
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:20 pm

i know a guy who put a310 wheels on an A320... left the hangar and mistake was found at the next station. should i be even writing these things... i mean there are passengers reading this. oh and by the way that was not here in spain but at my previous job
 
BAE146QT
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:06 pm



Quoting JetMech (Reply 14):
It's amazing how quickly the coneheads scatter when a job involves heavy lifting, dirt or excessive physical effort!

Rackmounting - that's something we have to do quite frequently. Any engineer working on your project who won't help you rackmount 30-odd KG of kit is simply showing their true colours. They don't get asked back for the double or triple overtime and they're only hurting themselves. Screw 'em.

Quoting Brenintw (Reply 32):
Thankfully, two glasses of wine and a sleeping pill took care of that for the rest of the flight.

It took me a minute to realise you weren't the pilot. LOL

Quoting JetMech (Reply 34):
As you can imagine, most of the snags are for really minor detail items, that have absolutely no bearing of the serviceability of the aircraft. His favourite is missing screw caps on the bleed screws of brake units, and stuff like missing decals in the toilets and galleys. He also seems to go nuts over small pieces of plastic trim on the passenger seats



Quoting JetMech (Reply 38):
It's very true what you both say. Despite all his peculiarities and at times, titanic personality, this particular engineer is definitely the one you want to be working with when the s*** hits the fan.

There are people in IT Security like this. You curse them on a daily basis but when you need them, you're glad they're there. Jetmech is right - they are a different breed, but they are the people you want when it all goes south.
Todos mis dominós son totalmente pegajosos
 
MD11Engineer
Posts: 13899
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:10 pm



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 43):
Also the Folks from the previous night shift not changing that worn tire or brake assy & forcing the morning shift guys to do that in line Mx distrupting a scheduled flight.

regds
MEL

Or certain other (main) stations, who swap those aircraft they do not want to fix themselves (loads of snags or serious T/S involved) into other stations, and swap them back the moment they are good, just to pass the next junker to the outstation.

At a previous airline there existed a station in the US which had a reputation for being lazy. They would MEL the smallest things (like nav lights, why didn't they just change the bulb? Takes just as much time as MEL'ling the item).
Once they sent us a 747 with a main wheel showing some thread, the way the tyre was worn it didn't just happen on the last flight. My supervisor told me to dispatch the plane as it was for an experiment. As expected, next evening this plane was back again, with the same tyre, just the spot of wear having gotten bigger. We sent it back another time. Same, the plane came back next evening with the same flat spot. After almost one week of this, we decided that we couldn't take the responsibility anymore and changed the wheel.
After the wheel was replaced, the plane got sent somewhere else and did not return to our station anymore.

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
LMP737
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RE: Engineers Doing Dumb Things

Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:29 pm



Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 45):
Only if you tell him.......and then what happens.

If a flight takes a delay at the gate because you did not change a tire and/or brake the previous night it will be easy for them to find out who worked on that aircraft.
Never take financial advice from co-workers.

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