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carpediem
Topic Author
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Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 08, 2009 1:42 pm

Hi, chocks away, sometimes they are impossible to remove, they slide when it is ice conditions, strong winds can effect the tail and change wheelpositions. I wonder if somebody know of accidents, material or human caused by "bad" chocks, or general problems you have run into with the handling with chocks.
 
boeing767mech
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 08, 2009 3:26 pm

Quoting Carpediem (Thread starter):
material or human caused by "bad" chocks, or general problems you have run into with the handling with chocks.


The biggest problem we have is the snow plow operators getting our chocks with the plows and then putting them in the snow melt machine with the piles of snow. Chocks are handy for applying kinetic energy to a frozen ACM on a 767 or 767. (per the FIM you can lightly tap the ACM in full hot to restart a frozen ACM).

David

[Edited 2009-03-08 08:27:09]
Never under-estimate the predictably of stupidty
 
A10WARTHOG
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 08, 2009 5:05 pm



Quoting Carpediem (Thread starter):
or general problems you have run into with the handling with chocks.

People installing the chocks right up against the tires and then you put a fuel load on board. Loads of fun
 
Dufo
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 08, 2009 7:48 pm



Quoting A10warthog (Reply 2):
People installing the chocks right up against the tires and then you put a fuel load on board. Loads of fun

No problem if later they use the tug to pull them out..
I seriously think I just creamed my pants without any influence from any outside variables.
 
mmedford
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 08, 2009 8:08 pm

I remember acouple years ago at JFK T4, I believe. Guy working an inbound flight, rushes to chock the aircraft before the pilot set the brake. Aircraft rolled over him, killed him instantly...
ILS = It'll Land Somewhere
 
A10WARTHOG
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 08, 2009 8:10 pm



Quoting Dufo (Reply 3):
No problem if later they use the tug to pull them out..

Normally I have seen them beaten out with another chalk. We only had one gate tug which was hooked up to the plane and two tugs for maintenance, which was at the hangar.
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 08, 2009 9:37 pm

Chocks in place ONLY after engines are shutdown out here...........& placed 6-8 inches away from the wheels.
Major accidents is when people don't wait for the engines to be shutdown & at times stay too near the parking spot when the aircraft is taxing in.

regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
Mender
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 08, 2009 11:40 pm

IIRC a wheels up landing on a 737 was caused by a chock being left on the keel beam.
 
Mender
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 08, 2009 11:42 pm

 
avt007
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 08, 2009 11:46 pm

I was walking past the nose of a Dash 8 one night. The tow bar was attached, and a chock had been placed behind one nose wheel only. When the park brake was released, the aircraft rolled, the chock caused the nose gear to turn, and the swinging tow bar smashed into my ankle. The pain was immense, but luckily my work boots had padding around the ankles and all I got was a bruise.
Since then my pet peeves have been people not removing the tow bar, and people too lazy to throw the chock behind both tires.
 
T prop
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Mon Mar 09, 2009 2:12 am

This poor guy walking into the propeller of a Dash 8 while attempting to retrieve chocks.

http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief2.asp?...904X01867&ntsbno=DCA01MA056&akey=1
 
2H4
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Mon Mar 09, 2009 3:03 am

Here's another.

2H4
Intentionally Left Blank
 
FlyASAGuy2005
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Mon Mar 09, 2009 3:11 am

Loved when the guy pushing back would have the pilot release the breaks before the chocks are removed. The nose is alread hooked up to the strap on the lektro so no worries, but it would till roll back a hair which is just enough to make them not want to come ot so we would remove the chock in the front of the tire and pull up the a/c.

Also saw someone roll right over the rear chocks one time. That was, well, interesting.
What gets measured gets done.
 
dragon6172
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Mon Mar 09, 2009 10:34 am

When I was stationed in Japan, we did not have enough spots to park all of our aircraft out of the hanger. We parked the extra aircraft on a piece of asphalt that had a slight angle to it, on the side of the apron. One night the hydraulic shop brought out the service cart and decided to use the chocks from the aircraft on the cart since the carts brakes did not work. Everything was fine until a C-130 taxied past... the bit of prop blast was enough to put the unchocked plane rolling backwards down the hill and into the grass, ripping the hyd servicing lines from the side of the aircraft since they were hooked to the chocked service cart!
Phrogs Phorever
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Mon Mar 09, 2009 10:46 am



Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 12):
Also saw someone roll right over the rear chocks one time. That was, well, interesting.

I'm chocked, I tell you! Chocked!
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
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litz
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Mon Mar 09, 2009 6:01 pm



Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 12):
Also saw someone roll right over the rear chocks one time. That was, well, interesting.

Rolling anything over a wheel chock can be interesting, especially if it's a multi-axle bogey.

I've seen it happen with locomotives ... imagine trying to get a steel wheel chock out from under something that weighs 485,000 lbs!

You put enough forward energy in place, and you'll bump right over it.

What do you do with airplanes, jack the bogey up to extract the chock?

- litz
 
OzTech
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Mon Mar 09, 2009 8:14 pm

I dropped one on my foot once....  laughing   laughing   laughing 

Other uses are to completely chock an avionics vehicle full of lazy EIR Mechs who never get out of said vehicle to chock an arriving aircraft or push in MX entry steps or plug in ground power... They have to get out eventually to remove them... normally to get to the canteen before the mech guys...  headache   headache 
No defect too big, no defect too small, nothing in the log --- No defect at all !!
 
Leezyjet
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Mon Mar 09, 2009 11:37 pm



Quoting Litz (Reply 15):
Rolling anything over a wheel chock can be interesting

I drove over a set of chocks once in a Bedford Rascal van - made one hell of a bang and considering the size of a Bedford Rascal Van (google it) I'm surprised it wasn't stopped dead in its tracks !!.

Quoting OzTech (Reply 16):
Other uses are to completely chock an avionics vehicle

Chocking vehicles is quite a good trick to play on those new to the ramp environment !!.

 Smile
"She Rolls, 45 knots, 90, 135, nose comes up to 20 degrees, she's airborne - She flies, Concorde Flies"
 
reflectiveman
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Tue Mar 10, 2009 5:32 am



Quoting Litz (Reply 15):

I've seen it happen with locomotives ... imagine trying to get a steel wheel chock out from under something that weighs 485,000 lbs!

There was a chemical plant I used to pull cars from, where the plant switcher crew would put the chocks down first and then move the car up to them, usually resulting with the car ending up on top of the chock to some extent.

Needless to say, no human was going to remove those chocks without moving the car off of them first.
 
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litz
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Tue Mar 10, 2009 5:53 pm



Quoting Reflectiveman (Reply 18):
Needless to say, no human was going to remove those chocks without moving the car off of them first.

It's also a very, very effective method of 1) preventing theft of the chock and 2) making sure it isn't removed with out an active crew present and hooked to the cars.

 Smile

(all these airplane folks are going ... huh?)

- litz
 
twal1011727
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Tue Mar 10, 2009 9:34 pm



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 6):
placed 6-8 inches away from the wheels

That to me is quite excessive...if you have a slanted ramp, the A/C could roll back against the chock. If the jet-bridge is up to the A/C and the A/C rolls - damage to the entry door can result.

Delta policy is "Chocks that are not positioned to lightly touch the centerline
of the tire will not perform as designed."

I believe that they should be within 1 inch but not necessarily touching the tire.

Quoting Mender (Reply 7):
IIRC a wheels up landing on a 737 was caused by a chock being left on the keel beam

I believe an Eastern aircraft had that happen too in MIA

Quoting Litz (Reply 15):
What do you do with airplanes, jack the bogey up to extract the chock?

One way to pull a stuck chock is to use a steel bar about 5 or 6 feet long.
Inserted into the hole on the end of the chock and pryed out.
Another way is to push/pull the A/C with the pushtruck just enough to get it out.

Quoting Leezyjet (Reply 17):
Chocking vehicles is quite a good trick to play on those new to the ramp environment

We had an employee that was not all together there mentally.
When we chocked his truck rear tire, he rocked against it til he got pissed then gunned the engine.
Thus slamming the chock up against the underside of his truck.
The result was he ripped out the brake lines of his truck.
It was still funny though.

KD
 
josekmlb
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Wed Mar 11, 2009 8:04 am



Quoting TWAL1011727 (Reply 20):
We had an employee that was not all together there mentally.
When we chocked his truck rear tire, he rocked against it til he got pissed then gunned the engine.
Thus slamming the chock up against the underside of his truck.
The result was he ripped out the brake lines of his truck.
It was still funny though.

KD

Yeah I bet it was and I remember a person on our ramp that tried to push the plane with chocks in.
 
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litz
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Wed Mar 11, 2009 5:55 pm



Quoting TWAL1011727 (Reply 20):
One way to pull a stuck chock is to use a steel bar about 5 or 6 feet long.
Inserted into the hole on the end of the chock and pryed out.
Another way is to push/pull the A/C with the pushtruck just enough to get it out.

What do you do if you bump OVER the chock, and it's now in-between the two axles of a bogey?

(in the railroad world, that pretty much guarantees a call to the "boys with the big yellow toys", as you very rarely can get the chock out without lifting the locomotive)

- litz
 
YWG
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:06 pm

Speaking of incidents where chocks SHOULD have been used.....
Big version: Width: 658 Height: 493 File size: 31kb
Contact Winnipeg center now on 134.4, good day.
 
twal1011727
Posts: 449
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:47 pm



Quoting YWG (Reply 23):
Speaking of incidents where chocks SHOULD have been used.....

Man...thats just not right...thats like opening a door into your face and having your nose come out the other side of the door.

KD
 
reflectiveman
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Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 12:39 am

RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:49 pm



Quoting Litz (Reply 22):
as you very rarely can get the chock out without lifting the locomotive)

Of course you can, you can roll off of them rather easily, rolling onto the chock is actually a fairly common problem.

Just make sure you are not standing anywhere near the chock as its going to take flight as soon as movement starts.

Back to the av side of this discussion, has there ever been a case where a chock has been ingested into a engine?
 
YWG
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Thu Mar 12, 2009 12:36 am

Quoting TWAL1011727 (Reply 24):
Man...thats just not right...thats like opening a door into your face and having your nose come out the other side of the door.

I'm sorry you feel that way.


Edited: For Spelling

[Edited 2009-03-11 17:40:58]
Contact Winnipeg center now on 134.4, good day.
 
Silver1SWA
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Thu Mar 12, 2009 3:35 am

One of my biggest pet peeves is when someone chocks an aircraft and places the chocks so that the sides are flush with the side of the tires. It makes it impossible to kick them out. Always leave some room with a little bit of the chocks sticking out so you can kick them out when removing them!  banghead 

Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 12):
Also saw someone roll right over the rear chocks one time. That was, well, interesting.

LOL I saw this once...a guy didn't see a set of chocks on the mains and pushed out. The aircraft rode it like a speedbump as he pushed out. OOPS... Quite interesting indeed...
ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
 
DiamondFlyer
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Thu Mar 12, 2009 3:39 am

As a GA ramp guy/baggage handler/fueler/caterer/lavatory service guy/whatever else I did when the boss called, I saw a guy in a Beech Musketeer/Skipper/Sierra (BE23) forget to take the chock off the nose gear. We didn't notice it until he had the plane started, and I'm not dumb enough to go under and get it, that close to a turning prop. He ended up taxing over it. I think it took him near takeoff power to get over it. It was quite funny watching his expression, when he couldn't get the plane to taxi.

-DiamondFlyer
From my cold, dead hands
 
josekmlb
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Thu Mar 12, 2009 8:00 am



Quoting Litz (Reply 22):
What do you do if you bump OVER the chock, and it's now in-between the two axles of a bogey?

That's why you push the A/C if the chock is in front or pull the A/C if the chock is behind it. I done it lots of times with no problems and you only move the A/C a few inch's if that to get the chock out.
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Thu Mar 12, 2009 9:08 am



Quoting DiamondFlyer (Reply 28):
He ended up taxing over it. I think it took him near takeoff power to get over it.

Ideal would have been to shutdown the engines,& then withdraw the chocks.
regds
MEL.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
Sinlock
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Thu Mar 12, 2009 2:08 pm



Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 21):
Yeah I bet it was and I remember a person on our ramp that tried to push the plane with chocks in.



Quoting Litz (Reply 22):
Yeah I bet it was and I remember a person on our ramp that tried to push the plane with chocks in.

I watched one girl push a 757 about 15 feet with the nose chocks, Bright yellow ones. I guess after 23 years with the airline she still had things to learn.
 
pilotboi
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Thu Mar 12, 2009 3:24 pm



Quoting Carpediem (Thread starter):
strong winds can effect the tail and change wheelpositions

IIRC, most aircraft's steering systems are not directly connected to the rudder, so that wouldn't happen. And even if they are connected, it won't happen if you remember to put the bypass pin in right away  Wink
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Thu Mar 12, 2009 3:51 pm



Quoting Sinlock (Reply 31):
a 757 about 15 feet with the nose chocks

Were these metal chocks?
Wouldn't rubber chocks grab.

Quoting Pilotboi (Reply 32):
Quoting Carpediem (Thread starter):
strong winds can effect the tail and change wheelpositions

IIRC, most aircraft's steering systems are not directly connected to the rudder, so that wouldn't happen. And even if they are connected, it won't happen if you remember to put the bypass pin in right away

The poster is probably referring to the wind velocity striking the Tailplane & moving the aircraft & nothing to do with the steering interconnect.

I think theres a video on the net showing strong winds moving a parked B737 with tow bar attached to tow truck,but Parking brakes released & the Aircraft swinging.

regds
MEL.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
OPNLguy
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Fri Mar 13, 2009 6:52 am



Quoting Mender (Reply 7):
IIRC a wheels up landing on a 737 was caused by a chock being left on the keel beam.

That would have been Piedmont/USAir back in the late 1980s, at CLT.
ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
 
Bartonsayswhat
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:13 am

Quoting Carpediem (Thread starter):
I wonder if somebody know of accidents

It was a really really windy day and we were loading cans into a Purolator B727 (Kelowna Flightcraft.) We went back into the warehouse to get the last two cans and when we came back something wasn't right. Where the stairs were there were eight chocks, two for each wheel on the stairs (thats how windy it was.) These stairs were nowhere to be found. We looked aound saw a scrape on the radom (which was subsequently replaced) starting from the centre of the nose, all the way down the No 2 side. We kept walking that way until we found the stairs, about 100 yards down the ramp, 2 inches into the wing of a DHC-6 fresh out of the hanger. This twotter hadn't actually flown yet since its overhaul. The dent was buffed out and re-painted, but if you know where to look when that a/c is in you can still see where the stairs hit.

So these stairs on L1 jumped for sets of stairs, scraped up the right side of the radome, 100 yds down the ramp, and hit a twotter, and we still got the flight out on time (mx was perfromed downline)

[Edited 2009-03-13 01:17:48]
 
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SEPilot
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:48 pm



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 30):
Ideal would have been to shutdown the engines,& then withdraw the chocks.
regds

I have done that more than once. Shutting down the engine and getting out, while embarrassing, is far less so than the possible unexpected results of trying to horse the plane over the chocks. Go over the explanation you are going to give the owner of the plane you run into when your plane moves so much faster than you expect once it gets over the chock.
The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sat Mar 14, 2009 8:11 am



Quoting SEPilot (Reply 36):
is far less so than the possible unexpected results of trying to horse the plane over the chocks.

Exactly.There is no shortcut in Aviation.......Safety first ALWAYS.
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
twal1011727
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Sun Mar 15, 2009 8:16 pm



Quoting YWG (Reply 26):
Quoting TWAL1011727 (Reply 24):
Man...thats just not right...thats like opening a door into your face and having your nose come out the other side of the door.

I'm sorry you feel that way.

I'm just referring to the unfortunate damage that resulted.
Not anything about chocks. The hurt factor is enormous.

KD
 
hercppmx
Posts: 159
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Mon Mar 16, 2009 3:37 am



Quoting Dragon6172 (Reply 13):
When I was stationed in Japan, we did not have enough spots to park all of our aircraft out of the hanger. We parked the extra aircraft on a piece of asphalt that had a slight angle to it, on the side of the apron. One night the hydraulic shop brought out the service cart and decided to use the chocks from the aircraft on the cart since the carts brakes did not work. Everything was fine until a C-130 taxied past... the bit of prop blast was enough to put the unchocked plane rolling backwards down the hill and into the grass, ripping the hyd servicing lines from the side of the aircraft since they were hooked to the chocked service cart!

This does not surprise me. Strike 1 up for airframes. I guess someone took QA to seriously when they said all GSE has to be Chocked. Then Again I always wonder why Futenma Flight line was a hill.


We had a new guy place the chocks for the c-130 (we place them between the two main gear wheels facing opposite directions normally right up against each other with about 10 inches on either side from the tires.) He placed them right up against the wheels, The aircraft rolled a little when the brakes were being set. Needless to say, we sent him to go grab the BFH (big F***ing Hammer for non military out there.) and watched him knock it out.
C-130; it's a love-hate relationship
 
carpediem
Topic Author
Posts: 2
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Tue Apr 07, 2009 7:13 pm

Thank you for all replays, we had nearlya accident, when doing service on a aircraft in the hangar, chocks where left on in the wheelhouse. And at the stand/bridge the wheels where "chocked" as normal. When the aircraft took off the first choch fell of att the runway. FOD team dicovered it before next takeoff,
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Tue Apr 07, 2009 11:55 pm



Quoting Carpediem (Reply 40):
chocks where left on in the wheelhouse

Are you saying chocks were kept in the wheelwell.What type was the Aircraft?
regds
MEL.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
CanadianNorth
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RE: Accidents Involving Chocks

Wed Apr 08, 2009 12:50 am

Ran into a chock related problem not long ago...

At school one of our projects is to take our group of five and do an annual inspection on one of the Aerostars. So we were working away on UTV and I was asked a question from under the aircraft so I ducted under the wing to answer it. First thing I see is a nice big crack on the lower wing where it meets the outboard side of the engine setup. I looked up at it and right beside it, just forward of the jacking point are two nice big dents and a set of scrapes

So, it was noted on our defect report and next time the instructor happened to come by we pointed it out and got the full story from him that the crack and dents were actually part of an incident that bent the main wing spar, rendering the aircraft damaged beyond economical repair.

What happened was several years ago some students were doing a weight and balance check, which involved jacking the aircraft, placing scales under each wheel, and then lowering it onto those. Because it was only going to be there for a couple minutes they left the jacks in place and just lowered them enough so they weren't contacting the aircraft, but nobody thought to chock the aircraft once it was put down. So as you can imagine it didn't take long for the aircraft to roll off the scales, and cause the left wing to fall onto the jack about 6 inches forward of the designated jacking point, bashing into the lower skin of the wing and bending the spar.

All because nobody thought to throw in a set of chocks that were sitting about a foot away.



CanadianNorth
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