Page 1 of 1

Caravelle Yokes

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 10:13 pm
by kimon
What were those odd looking side-yokes on Caravelles?
A precursor of the side-stick?
Does anyone have good photos?

RE: Caravelle Yokes

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 10:26 pm
by tdscanuck


Quoting Kimon (Thread starter):
What were those odd looking side-yokes on Caravelles?

Those are the main yokes...same function as in any other yoke-based airplane, just different mounting.

Quoting Kimon (Thread starter):
A precursor of the side-stick?

Not really...the motion on the yoke is the same as a conventional between-the-legs yoke.

Quoting Kimon (Thread starter):
Does anyone have good photos?

This is the best one I could find:
https://www.airliners.net/photo/Trans...t=&prev_id=1272858&next_id=1272856

Tom.

RE: Caravelle Yokes

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 11:28 pm
by Stealthz
A quick comparison between the image posted above and-


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Nick Salmon
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ryan Hemmings



Illustrates quite clearly how much DH Comet there was in the pointy end of the Caravelle

Cheers

RE: Caravelle Yokes

Posted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 3:46 am
by 411A
The deHavilland Comet and SUD Caravelle designs, although looking very similar at the pointy end, were entirely different, from a systems perspective.
The Caravelle design was very advanced for its time, fully hydraulic powered flight controls, and many redundant systems.
Also, the Caravelle was the first jet transport airplane to perform CATIIIB autolands, using a Lear designed duplex autopilot system.
This design was used (as I recall) by the French Post Office for air mail, however, not for passenger ops.
Passenger ops required a triplex autoflight system, such as the one designed by Smiths and installed on the HS.121 Trident.

RE: Caravelle Yokes

Posted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 11:20 am
by Fabo
Well, the allready old by that time DC-2 had it, so hardly a "first" or some kind of "sidestick precursor" - remember by the time of DC-2 the computers were merely imagination (well, sorta).

RE: Caravelle Yokes

Posted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 11:59 am
by Starlionblue
Sidesticks do not really require computers, although I guess you need fully powered controls to make them really practical.

RE: Caravelle Yokes

Posted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 1:43 pm
by kimon
The Caravelle was also the first clean-swept wing (commercial aviation) and rear-fuselage mounted engines.

RE: Caravelle Yokes

Posted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 3:21 pm
by Jetlagged


Quoting 411A (Reply 3):
The deHavilland Comet and SUD Caravelle designs, although looking very similar at the pointy end, were entirely different, from a systems perspective.

The Caravelle and Comet noses weren't just very similar, Sud Aviation re-used the DH design for the early Caravelle marks. What went inside the structure was clearly entirely different.

RE: Caravelle Yokes

Posted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 4:23 pm
by vc10


Quoting 411A (Reply 3):
The Caravelle design was very advanced for its time, fully hydraulic powered flight controls, and many redundant systems.

The Comet also had fully hydraulic powered flying controls

littlevc10