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Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Mon Sep 28, 2015 8:00 pm
by green12324
Hi all,

I am looking to attend a school and get my dispatch certificate in the next couple of years. What are some schools you'd recommend? I am in the Chicago area, but I'm willing to travel if necessary.

Thanks for the help

RE: Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Tue Sep 29, 2015 8:02 am
by covert
Sheffield, IFOD or Jeppesen seem to be popular with the dispatchers on the other more job oriented aviation forum that I am a member of.

RE: Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Tue Sep 29, 2015 11:04 am
by flyDTW1992
Sheffield seems to be very well regarded. I'm considering them as well as some smaller programs right now. Sheffield offers a distance learning program followed by 2 or 1 week classroom sessions.

RE: Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Fri Oct 02, 2015 7:27 am
by L-188
I got my certificate, which I am finally using after having it for a decade, through a local adult education program here in Anchorage.

The instructor was drawn from a place called the Career Academy here in Anchorage that offers a dispatch program.

RE: Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2015 4:13 am
by northwestEWR
Quoting flyDTW1992 (Reply 2):
Sheffield seems to be very well regarded. I'm considering them as well as some smaller programs right now. Sheffield offers a distance learning program followed by 2 or 1 week classroom sessions.

That is ridiculously short. I did mine in a 10 week classroom program and even that felt rushed. Part of what makes Dispatch interesting is all the different areas that you need to understand and be able to work--you really can't get a good handle on all that in a week.

I recommend Falcon Aviation Academy near Atlanta. They're small but have some outstanding folks teaching--all of whom are either retired Delta Dispatch or current Delta/ExpressJet employees. I loved my time there and highly recommend it to anyone interested.

RE: Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Sun Oct 04, 2015 6:33 am
by flyDTW1992
Quoting northwestEWR (Reply 4):
That is ridiculously short. I did mine in a 10 week classroom program and even that felt rushed. Part of what makes Dispatch interesting is all the different areas that you need to understand and be able to work--you really can't get a good handle on all that in a week.

To be fair, the distance learning phase is 4 months long. And I do have a 4 year aviation management degree and going on a year of flight operations experience, and a year of ground handling experience. My college program also offered dispatch, but I elected not to do it there, but in the process I completed about half of the required courses for dispatch.

That said, I'm sure you have a point, but since I've got a full-time job there's just no way anything more than two weeks would be doable. Which is one reason I'm still weighing whether I'm going to get my cert at all. I have no interest in being a
"frontline" dispatcher, as I'm quickly learning that I don't want to do shift work for the rest of my life. Some of the other types of positions I'd like to pursue would benefit from having the certificate, though.

RE: Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Tue Oct 06, 2015 2:43 am
by SKC
In reality, which dispatch school you choose doesn't matter in the big scheme of things. Getting the cert, then getting some experience is the primary thing.

Sheffield, Riddle, IFOD, the Kroger down the street, doesn't matter, unless you're getting it from a Cracker Jacks box. Any employer that is more worried about where you got the cert vs what experience you have isn't worth working for. The classes you'll attend for the cert are very basic. When you get to an airline, that's where you'll actually be trained.

Find a school that you feel comfortable with, can afford, and that their instructors are or have worked as dispatchers before.

I know you were asking for recommendations, but figured I'd just add a few tidbits in hopes that you don't stress out too much about choosing a school. I went to IFOD, before it was called IFOD. I'd recommend it again.

RE: Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Tue Oct 06, 2015 2:52 pm
by bhmdiversion
I recommend AGS in Cincinnati. They teach you how to source the info and not memorize like Sheffield. Im sure Eric will be on here soon enough, but an antiquated 727 does nothing for someone going to a Regional Airline.

RE: Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Wed Oct 07, 2015 3:36 pm
by SKC
Quoting bhmdiversion (Reply 7):
but an antiquated 727 does nothing for someone going to a Regional Airline.

The purpose of a dispatch school isn't to prepare you for what you'll be dispatching, as that wouldn't be very efficient based on the sheer number of a/c types out there. It's sole purpose is to teach you enough to pass your test and have your knowledge base large enough to get you through the interview with the basic principles of dispatching. Of course, some are better than others at this, but don't dismiss some options just because they still teach the 72.

The airline you become employed with will teach you the finer points of the CRJ / ERJ / 737, etc. Learn the basics of aircraft systems at school, then your airline will tweak it to their specific requirements.

RE: Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Thu Oct 08, 2015 2:04 am
by northwestEWR
Quoting SKC (Reply 8):
but don't dismiss some options just because they still teach the 72.

The FAA test questions are all based on the DC9, 737 Classic, 727 and Beech 1900. It's perfectly fine to teach the old ways because that's what you'll be tested on.

Once you get to an airline, you'll get a type rating on the airplane you'll be working anyway.

RE: Best ADX Schools In US

Posted: Sat Oct 10, 2015 10:21 am
by L-188
Quoting SKC (Reply 8):
It's sole purpose is to teach you enough to pass your test and have your knowledge base large enough to get you through the interview with the basic principles of dispatching.

Exactly, it is just an introduction. Every airline is going to have different equipment. I would say license to learn but I find that saying cliche

Quoting northwestEWR (Reply 9):
The FAA test questions are all based on the DC9, 737 Classic, 727 and Beech 1900. It's perfectly fine to teach the old ways because that's what you'll be tested on.

The math for a weight and balance generally doesn't change based on the aircraft you train on. Neither will the dangers posed by CB clouds.

That being said when I went to dispatch school, they did not have Q routes and they were still putting new MLS approaches in the book.

Our school airplane was the 1900 but now I dispatch 737-200/300, the company trained me on those