Qantas747300
Topic Author
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Dec 29, 2006 7:08 pm

B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 5:58 am

As the title suggests, I'm interested in the primary differences in the auto flight functions of the B737NG and the A320.

What are the major philosophical differences of the autopilots?

[Edited 2015-10-11 23:24:11]
 
mmo
Posts: 1766
Joined: Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:04 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 6:21 am

Quoting Qantas747300 (Thread starter):
For example, my research indicates a primary means of interface to the FMGS is through the throttles when considering the A/T mode on the A320

Care to explain? I have no clue as to what you mean by that statement.

Quoting Qantas747300 (Thread starter):
What are the major philosophical differences of the autopilots?

In reality, you are asking a question that is very hard to answer. Remember the 737NG is not FBW while the 320 is. The autopilot is actually part of the flight control system and the two are interrelated unlike the 737 in which there are two distinct systems.
If we weren't all crazy we'd all go insane!
 
Qantas747300
Topic Author
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Dec 29, 2006 7:08 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 6:41 am

Quoting mmo (Reply 1):
I have no clue as to what you mean by that statement.

I was unclear, I agree. I have very little exposure to the Airbus product and trying to 'paint the picture' with manuals.

Quoting mmo (Reply 1):
The autopilot is actually part of the flight control system and the two are interrelated unlike the 737 in which there are two distinct systems.

I think this is exactly what I am after. Could you please expand a little on the autopilot being a part of the flight control system? It doesn't need to be in-depth, but I'm a little overwhelmed on how the system works.
 
thepinkmachine
Posts: 361
Joined: Tue Apr 28, 2015 4:43 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 8:13 am

I am a Bus guy, with limited exposure to Boeings (couple of sim rides, that's it), but I was actually quite surprised how similar the autoflight systems are between these 2. At least from the user's perspective, as I have not much clue of the inner workings of these systems.

They seem to be doing exactly the same things in (almost) the same way. Just the terminology is different:

Airbus OPEN CLB/DES = Boeing FLCH (with minor differences)

Airbus MANAGED CLB/DES = Boeing VNAV (again, with minor differences, but giving same end result)

Airbus MANAGED NAV = Boeing LNAV

Airbus MANAGED APPR = Boeing IAN

etc.

The main difference I have noticed speed control - on the Bus you can do the entire flight without ever touching the speed knob - it's almost always 'managed'. Plus there are some extras that Boeings don't have, like GSmini and Afloor

As for Thrust Levers being an autopilot interface: Airbus mention that a lot in their manuals, but it's quite overrated IMO. The only thing these levers control is: engage appropriate mode for takeoff or go-around, arm/engage the autothrust and swithch it off on landing. Again - pushing the levers forward is similar to using the TOGA button on the Boeing. At the end of the day, in normal ops you:

- set the levers to TOGA (or FLEX, which is same thing as Assumed Temp.) for takeoff
- move them back a notch at thrust reduction altitude to select CLB Thrust (and engage ATHR)
- set them to IDLE just before flare

Quite simple and intuitive, no rocket science there  
 
mmo
Posts: 1766
Joined: Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:04 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 9:23 am

Quoting Qantas747300 (Reply 2):

I think this is exactly what I am after. Could you please expand a little on the autopilot being a part of the flight control system? It doesn't need to be in-depth, but I'm a little overwhelmed on how the system works.

Quite simply, when you hand fly the Airbus, you are not moving the controls directly, like you would be doing in a Boeing. Granted the Boeing has hydraulic controls so you are moving an actuator. On the Airbus, you make a movement with the sidestick and that is then processed by the flight control computers. The A320 has a total of seven flight control computers - two ELACs (Elevator Aileron Computer), three SECs (Spoilers Elevator Computer) and two FACs (Flight Augmentation Computers). The autopilot also makes electronic inputs when it commands a control input. The computers will evaluate the control input to ensure, in direct law, none of the limits are exceeded. In the Boeing if you want to 60 degrees of bank you simply move the yoke until you get what you want. You can't do that in the Airbus. The Boeings have a bank limiter that is part of the autopilot system that limits the bank angle. There is an auto position that lets the FMS control the angel at altitude. On the Airbus when on autopilot or "hand flying" there are pitch and bank limits, when in direct law, in the Boeings when hand flying the aircraft you get what you want.

That's the difference in a very basic explaination.
If we weren't all crazy we'd all go insane!
 
QFA380
Posts: 2013
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 4:38 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 10:46 am

One of the biggest differences I think -from a hugely uneducated perspective; the physical interface between pilot and plane is very different. In the 737 you press the button for whatever mode you want, in the A320 you push/pull the knob. Airbus you turn the dial to whatever value you want and push or pull the button.

A common theme between the 3 main FCU knobs is you pull the knob for a pilot controlled mode and push the knob for a FMC controlled mode. I think this creates a nice little mechanism in an Airbus pilot's brain by differentiating pilot vs computer controlled. Not implying in anyway the pilot is not controlling the computer however there is a big difference between a altitude/waypoint combo in the FMC that the plan will achieve vs a raw xx00ft/min V/S climb.

As mentioned above, I believe all of the core A/P modes are largely the same except in the bus with envelope protections although these are independent of the A/P and will activate irrespective of if the autopilot is flying or the pilot is flying.

Quoting mmo (Reply 4):
The computers will evaluate the control input to ensure, in direct law, none of the limits are exceeded.

I'm not an expert but do you mean in Normal Law? I thought in Direct or Alternate Law the limit protections were reduced. Direct Law is just that, direct sidestick -> control deflection.

Airbus pilots not knowing the differences between their respective laws and what law the plane is using can be deadly, as seen in AF447 and the NZ A320 test flight crash.

Here is a fascinating page I just found. http://www.airbusdriver.net/airbus_fltlaws.htm
 
User avatar
Starlionblue
Posts: 19314
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2004 9:54 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 10:55 am

Quoting mmo (Reply 4):
The computers will evaluate the control input to ensure, in direct law, none of the limits are exceeded.

That would be Normal Law. Direct Law is the most degraded law and has no protections.

Quoting mmo (Reply 4):
. In the Boeing if you want to 60 degrees of bank you simply move the yoke until you get what you want. You can't do that in the Airbus.

Sure you can. Just roll to 60 degrees with sidestick input.

The following comments relate to stick or yoke movement in manual flight:

In a 737 roll inputs on the yoke command a surface deflection proportional to yoke movement. Thus at higher speeds the same input gives a larger aircraft response. In a FBW Airbus, in Normal Law stick inputs in roll demand a roll rate proportional to stick input regardless of speed. Once at a certain bank angle if you let go of the stick, the plane will retain that bank angle (up to 33 degrees). To maintain more than 33 degrees (up to a maximum of 67 degrees) you have to hold the stick deflected (and add backpressure as needed). Once you let go the plane goes back to 33 degrees and stays there.

Moving to pitch, in a 737 pitch inputs on the yoke command a surface deflection proportional to yoke movement. Thus at higher speeds the same input gives a larger aircraft response. In a FBW Airbus in Normal Law, stick inputs in pitch command a proportional load factor increase (increase assumes you're pulling of course) in pitch regardless of speed. You are essentially telling the aircraft how many Gs to pull while changing flight path in pitch. The bigger the stick deflection, the higher the load factor up to the maximums.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
mmo
Posts: 1766
Joined: Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:04 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 2:07 pm

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 6):

Quoting mmo (Reply 4):
The computers will evaluate the control input to ensure, in direct law, none of the limits are exceeded.

That would be Normal Law. Direct Law is the most degraded law and has no protections.

My mistake!! Mea Culpa!!

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 6):
Sure you can. Just roll to 60 degrees with sidestick input.

But watch what happens when you let go! Plus, you can't exceed 60 degrees. No such protection on the 737 or any other Boeing for that matter!
If we weren't all crazy we'd all go insane!
 
thepinkmachine
Posts: 361
Joined: Tue Apr 28, 2015 4:43 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 2:46 pm

With all respect, I am wondering why on this thread we are mixing AFCS and FBW. These are two SEPARATE systems (though interfacing with each other) and discussing them together just muddies the waters.

AFCS is based on two FMGC (FMGEC for A330) computers, which (among other stuff) perform autopilot functions and output steering commands for execution to flight control compters (ELACs for A320, PRIMs for all other FBW Airbii).

The only difference between the 737 and the Bus in this respect is that in the former AFCS acts via servos directly on the flight controls, while in the latter it does so via flight control computers - the end result being exactly the same...

Flight Envelope protection on the Bus has nothing to do with the autopilot, which has its own, much narrower envelope. Plus it automatically disconnects anyway, when, or before FBW protections come into play...
 
mmo
Posts: 1766
Joined: Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:04 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:03 pm

Quoting thepinkmachine (Reply 8):
With all respect, I am wondering why on this thread we are mixing AFCS and FBW. These are two SEPARATE systems (though interfacing with each other) and discussing them together just muddies the waters.

And you're on the Airbus????

Right from an old FCOM for the 320 I have. I suggest you take a look at 1.27.0. And I quote:

-Flight controlled are electrically controlled and hydraulically operated
-The stabilizer and rudder CAN be mechanically controlled
-Pilots use sidestick controllers to fly the aircraft in pitch and roll (and yaw indirectly through the turn coordination)
-Computers interpret pilot inputs and move the flight control surfaces, as necessary, to follow their orders.
There is a great and very simple of the relationship of the flight controls to the autopilot.

The 737 is all direct input to the control actuators. If you are on the Airbus you should, of all people, know that and how the autoflight works with the flight controls.
If we weren't all crazy we'd all go insane!
 
thepinkmachine
Posts: 361
Joined: Tue Apr 28, 2015 4:43 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:32 pm

Yes Mmo, I am on the Bus and I know my stuff... Instead of quoting some random passage from the FCOM (which, BTW is from the "Flight Controls" chapter), please re-read carefully my post above and correct any errors you find...

Hint: we are dicussing 'Autopilot' here, NOT Flight Control System/FBW. I hope I don't have to explain to you the differences between these two systems...

Regards,

Pink Machine
 
mmo
Posts: 1766
Joined: Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:04 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 7:02 pm

Quoting thepinkmachine (Reply 10):

Hint: we are dicussing 'Autopilot' here, NOT Flight Control System/FBW. I hope I don't have to explain to you the differences between these two systems...

Let me give you a little hint! On the Airbus you cannot talk about one without talking about the other. Since the two systems are interrelated you have to talk about both of them. Following your logic, there are no differences between the two aircraft. But that is not really true. The question was about philosophy of the autopilot!

Quoting thepinkmachine (Reply 10):
Yes Mmo, I am on the Bus and I know my stuff... Instead of quoting some random passage from the FCOM (which, BTW is from the "Flight Controls" chapter), please re-read carefully my post above and correct any errors you find...

You never answered his question. And what does it have to do where the quote was from? The same quote is in auto flight.

Quoting thepinkmachine (Reply 8):
Flight Envelope protection on the Bus has nothing to do with the autopilot, which has its own, much narrower envelope. Plus it automatically disconnects anyway, when, or before FBW protections come into play...



You just pointed out what I did! The two systems are part of the same system....FBW!!!!
If we weren't all crazy we'd all go insane!
 
thepinkmachine
Posts: 361
Joined: Tue Apr 28, 2015 4:43 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Mon Oct 12, 2015 8:09 pm

Quoting mmo (Reply 11):
On the Airbus you cannot talk about one without talking about the other. Since the two systems are interrelated you have to talk about both of them

I guess that's where we differ fundamentally. IMO They are two separate systems, serving different purposes, operated by different computers and described in totally different chapters of the manual. They do interface with each other, big time, but they are not the same thing.

Quoting mmo (Reply 11):
Following your logic, there are no differences between the two aircraft. But that is not really true. The question was about philosophy of the autopilot!

Precisely. The AUTOPILOTS of both a/c are actually quite similar in what they do and how they do it.

They both receive inputs from the pilot (via FCU/MCP), or from the FMS, process them and output steering commands to the respective FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS. They do so using similar modes (albeit with different names, as I have described earlier).

The only major difference between them is that the 737 autopilot acts directly on the flight controls via respective servos, whereas on the Bus it sends steering orders to the ELAC's/PRIMS.

Now, if we discuss the FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS of Boeing an Airbus, then yes - they are so competely different, that we could write a book about it. But that was not the OP's question...

Coming back to the 'Autopilot philosophy', another thing worth mentioning is that the Bus system controls the rudder and thrust in all flight regimes and is capable to fully control the a/c also in case of engine failure - including autoland and single engine g/a. (I guess this is not the case on 737, at least not aways).

Also, it is 'fail-operational', enabling CATIIIB OPS, whereas on the 737 it is 'fail-passive', enabling CATIIIA only (though, AFAIK, there are mods available enabling CATIIIB)

Cheers,

Pink
 
Qantas747300
Topic Author
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Dec 29, 2006 7:08 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Tue Oct 13, 2015 11:21 pm

Thank you to everyone! I really appreciate the explanations.
 
Qantas747300
Topic Author
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Dec 29, 2006 7:08 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Wed Oct 14, 2015 12:38 am

Does Airbus have the equivalent of the Boeing ALT HLD command? Or, is that managed through LVL/CHANGE by selecting an altitude and adjusting the VS/FPA?

And

Am I correct in saying that the 737NG does not allow the pilot to select a flight path angle as a function of vertical speed external to the FMC?

[Edited 2015-10-13 17:44:36]
 
a320fan
Posts: 772
Joined: Fri May 01, 2009 5:04 am

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Wed Oct 14, 2015 4:39 am

Quoting Qantas747300 (Reply 14):

Of course the A320 has an alt hold mode.

That is correct, FPA is not a selectable variable on the 737 autopilot. In fact I don't know any Boeing that allows for FPA to be controlled through the auto flight system like an A3xx or E-Jet. Perhaps the 787, but I haven't studied that aircrafts systems at all.
A319, A320, A321, A330-200, A350-900, A380, 737-700, 737-800, 777-200ER, 777-300, 777-300ER, 787-8, Q300, Q400
 
User avatar
7BOEING7
Posts: 3038
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 5:28 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Wed Oct 14, 2015 9:08 pm

Quoting a320fan (Reply 15):

That is correct, FPA is not a selectable variable on the 737 autopilot. In fact I don't know any Boeing that allows for FPA to be controlled through the auto flight system like an A3xx or E-Jet. Perhaps the 787, but I haven't studied that aircrafts systems at all.

On both the 777 and 787 the V/S control on the MCP can be switched by pushing the button to FPA.
 
Qantas747300
Topic Author
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Dec 29, 2006 7:08 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Thu Oct 15, 2015 1:14 am

Quoting a320fan (Reply 15):
Of course the A320 has an alt hold mode

Where is that located on the FCU? Does it work the same way as the Boeing system where it will hold the altitude that the ALT HOLD command is activated?
 
Qantas747300
Topic Author
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Dec 29, 2006 7:08 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:30 am

Quoting Qantas747300 (Reply 17):
Where is that located on the FCU?

Ahhh, it's a pull out function. So the only difference on the glare shield between the two aircraft is the EXPED function on the Airbus?
 
User avatar
glen
Posts: 345
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2005 4:43 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:07 am

Quoting Qantas747300 (Reply 18):
Ahhh, it's a pull out function. So the only difference on the glare shield between the two aircraft is the EXPED function on the Airbus?

No, it is a push function: When pushing the V/S selector knob, the system commands an immediate level-off by engaging V/S or FPA mode with a target of zero. The flight mode annunciator will display "V/S = 0".

Quoting Qantas747300 (Reply 18):
EXPED function

Not all A320 have the EXPED function installed. And as a side note: On the A330/A340 aircraft the EXPED pushbutton is replaced by an ALT-button, which has the same function as pushing the V/S-knob.
"The horizon of many people is a circle with zero radius which they call their point of view." - Albert Einstein
 
User avatar
Jetlagged
Posts: 2564
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 3:00 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Fri Oct 23, 2015 6:38 pm

Quoting mmo (Reply 7):
But watch what happens when you let go! Plus, you can't exceed 60 degrees. No such protection on the 737 or any other Boeing for that matter!

But an Airbus can still achieve 60 deg bank, which was the point being made.

As for no other Boeing having this, the 777 and 787 have similar bank protection. You can roll to 60 but you have to hold the wheel against increasing force and they will return to 30 if you let go of the wheel.

Quoting mmo (Reply 11):
Let me give you a little hint! On the Airbus you cannot talk about one without talking about the other. Since the two systems are interrelated you have to talk about both of them. Following your logic, there are no differences between the two aircraft. But that is not really true. The question was about philosophy of the autopilot!

The differences are in the Flight Control System, not the Autopilot. The Autopilot in an Airbus is separate from the Flight Control System. Protections only come into play at the extreme so the Airbus FCS will follow AP commands just as happens in a Boeing. The AP won't issue commands to exceed the flight envelope in either a Boeing or an Airbus. It's only the pilot, or an uncontrolled aircraft, that might exceed the limits and cause protections to become active.
The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
 
User avatar
zeke
Posts: 13827
Joined: Thu Dec 14, 2006 1:42 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Fri Oct 23, 2015 7:00 pm

Quoting thepinkmachine (Reply 8):
The only difference between the 737 and the Bus in this respect is that in the former AFCS acts via servos directly on the flight controls, while in the latter it does so via flight control computers - the end result being exactly the same...

Under the skin the Airbus autopilot is very different, it is trajectory based, that being it will know the pitch/roll/yaw trajectory desired, and if there is an external influence such as a gust it will take that into account. The 737 autopilot is older design and does not have the trajectory as an output, it has a speed, roll, pitch.

Most of the 737s build to date were never able to auto-land with full rollout, where an Airbus will autoland even with an engine inoperative with full roll-out. Most 737 autopilots built did not have the ability to maintain the runway cent-reline on landing, it did not understand the trajectory. Over the years they have upgraded the autopilot so that is now possible.
Human rights lawyers are "ambulance chasers of the very worst kind.'" - Sky News
 
User avatar
Starlionblue
Posts: 19314
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2004 9:54 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Fri Oct 23, 2015 11:27 pm

Quoting mmo (Reply 7):
Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 6):
Sure you can. Just roll to 60 degrees with sidestick input.

But watch what happens when you let go! Plus, you can't exceed 60 degrees. No such protection on the 737 or any other Boeing for that matter!

The Airbus limit is 67 degrees. To summarize roll control in Normal Law.
- Side input on the stick commands a roll rate. The more input, the higher the roll rate.
- Up to 33 degrees of bank, auto-trim is retained (no need for backpressure). If you let go of the stick, the plane maintains the bank.
- From 33 to the maximum 67 degrees of bank, no auto-trim (backpressure needed to maintain altitude). If you let go of the stick, the plane rolls out to 33 degrees of bank and maintains it.
- If overspeed protection is active, the plane rolls out to wings level. If bank is again commanded, it is limited to 45 degrees.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
User avatar
7BOEING7
Posts: 3038
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 5:28 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Sat Oct 24, 2015 5:57 am

Quoting zeke (Reply 21):
Most of the 737s build to date were never able to auto-land with full rollout, where an Airbus will autoland even with an engine inoperative with full roll-out. Most 737 autopilots built did not have the ability to maintain the runway cent-reline on landing, it did not understand the trajectory. Over the years they have upgraded the autopilot so that is now possible.

Not exactly true. More than half of all the 737's delivered to date had an available option "Fail-Operational Autoland" to provide full rollout capability. However, most customers did not select that option either because they didn't need it, the benefit wasn't worth the "cost" or the optional HUD gave them a similar capability.

With that option the 737 can also fly a single engine approach through rollout but with slightly higher minimums.
 
User avatar
Jetlagged
Posts: 2564
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 3:00 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:56 pm

Quoting zeke (Reply 21):
Under the skin the Airbus autopilot is very different, it is trajectory based, that being it will know the pitch/roll/yaw trajectory desired, and if there is an external influence such as a gust it will take that into account. The 737 autopilot is older design and does not have the trajectory as an output, it has a speed, roll, pitch.

Not quite sure what you mean by this. A 737 AP will maintain pitch and roll in a similar way and react to gusts. In LNAV and VNAV a 737 AP is just as interested in trajectory as an Airbus in Managed mode.

Quoting zeke (Reply 21):
Most of the 737s build to date were never able to auto-land with full rollout, where an Airbus will autoland even with an engine inoperative with full roll-out. Most 737 autopilots built did not have the ability to maintain the runway cent-reline on landing, it did not understand the trajectory. Over the years they have upgraded the autopilot so that is now possible.

Trajectory following is part of any autoland during rollout: maintaining the runway centreline.
The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
 
User avatar
zeke
Posts: 13827
Joined: Thu Dec 14, 2006 1:42 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Sat Oct 24, 2015 11:04 pm

Quoting 7BOEING7 (Reply 23):

Optional does not mean built, it is a standard feature on all A320s

Quoting Jetlagged (Reply 24):

The 737 is a dinosaur, the aircraft is obvious to what is going on around it, Airbus FBW is C star based, that has trajectory as an output. Being trajectory based the A320 pilot can select a track and flight path angle at any time via the FCU and the aircraft will fly that trajectory automatically compensating for changes in atmospheric conditions or aircraft configuration.
Human rights lawyers are "ambulance chasers of the very worst kind.'" - Sky News
 
User avatar
7BOEING7
Posts: 3038
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 5:28 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Sun Oct 25, 2015 5:34 am

Quoting zeke (Reply 25):
Optional does not mean built, it is a standard feature on all A320s

And based on the fact that most airlines by a large margin chose not to buy the option says they didn't need it or the HUD was adequate. It's a neat little feature but not a necessary for the vast majority of airline operations.
 
User avatar
zeke
Posts: 13827
Joined: Thu Dec 14, 2006 1:42 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Sun Oct 25, 2015 10:03 am

Quoting 7BOEING7 (Reply 26):

Yet standard feature on the 747/777/787, why is that ...... Awaiting the next reversion back to the 1960s....
Human rights lawyers are "ambulance chasers of the very worst kind.'" - Sky News
 
BoeingGuy
Posts: 6263
Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2010 6:01 pm

RE: B737NG And A320 Autopilot Differences

Sun Oct 25, 2015 4:10 pm

Quoting zeke (Reply 27):
Quoting 7BOEING7 (Reply 26):

Yet standard feature on the 747/777/787, why is that ...... Awaiting the next reversion back to the 1960s....

Full autoland and rollout has always been standard feature on all 757, 767, 777, 787, and 747-400 and -8 (not sure about the -300s as that is before my time). The 777 and 787 are certified to full Cat 3B on a single engine too, since they have individual autothrottle control for each thrust lever.

I'll keep my comments to myself about the 737, but I'm not in disagreement with your comment. It serves its purpose very well and sells like hotcakes. It makes a heck of a lot of money for Boeing and the customers. Enough said.

[Edited 2015-10-25 09:17:23]

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: cargil48, Karlsands and 41 guests

Popular Searches On Airliners.net

Top Photos of Last:   24 Hours  •  48 Hours  •  7 Days  •  30 Days  •  180 Days  •  365 Days  •  All Time

Military Aircraft Every type from fighters to helicopters from air forces around the globe

Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos