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Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sat Jul 13, 2019 7:49 pm

All non-database images in this guide are copyrighted by the screeners and may not be used in any shape or form without prior permission from the head screeners.


Disclaimer: This guide is intended to aid you in your upload and editing process. It is in no way a guarantee that your images will be accepted if you feel you have followed this guide.

As a photographer you have access to our aviation photography forum. There are many helpful and skilled people there who can help you improve your pictures. If this guide is not helpful please do not hesitate to ask our users for help. Remember to always do so with respect to everyone, including the Airliners.net Crew.


General notes before reading:
1. Images taken before the digital era (pre-2002 as a rough guideline) will be screened with more leniency because of their historical value and rarity, and to expand our database. The older the photo is, the more lenient we are. The implication of this policy is that you will see many old images in the database where quality is not as high as images taken today.

2. Rare aircraft and new registrations will also be screened with more leniency. We understand that the term rare is subjective. By rare we mean individual aircraft (new registrations). We do not mean the first visit of an aircraft to an airport, for example the first A380 visit to Amsterdam.

3. Often when fixing an image after a rejection, new problems can come to light (as this rejection guide will show on a number of occasions). Your image may for example be rejected on the first try for being too underexposed, and the next time it may be rejected for noise because in lightening the image digital noise was brought out. This is not screener inconsistency but a result of editing images.

4. The implication of point #3 is that some images may be unfixable no matter how much time you spend on improving them. Photoshop cannot save a bad picture! As screeners we will do our best to point out whenever we feel an image cannot be fixed but we will not be able to foresee this in every case. As a general rule if after 2-3 rejections your image is being rejected time and time again for similar reasons it will probably never make it.

5. When reworking images we strongly recommend to always start from scratch and not work on the rejected file. Double compression will cause great loss of quality, so always work from the original picture.

6. High resolution images show more flaws than low resolution images. We therefore advise everyone to upload images at 1200-1600 pixels wide. Uploading higher resolutions (with a maximum of 1920 pixels wide) should only be done with very high quality images and sufficient editing experience.

7. When an image gets rejected and you want to upload it again, we appreciate a short note in the "comment to screeners" box on the upload page on why this image was rejected before.


Legend

General:
1. Priority screening guidelines
2. Boeing customer codes
3. Types of images we accept

Upload help texts:
4. Uploading your photo
5. Watermark
6. Autocomplete
7. Not an aircraft?
8. Aircraft
9. Builder
10. Airline
11. Identification numbers
12. Location (country/region/location)
13. Date
14. Categories
15. Caption
16. Comment to screeners

Rejection reasons:
17. Banding
18. Blurry
19. Borders
20. Category
21. CCW Rotation
22. Color
23. Common
24. Compression
25. Copyright
26. CW Rotation
27. Dirty
28. Distance
29. Double
30. Editing
31. Error
32. Halos
33. Heat Haze
34. High Contrast
35. High in Frame
36. Info
37. Left in Frame
38. Low contrast
39. Low in Frame
40. Motive
41. Noise
42. Overexposed
43. Oversharpened
44. People
45. Personal Message
46. Photog
47. Quality
48. Reupload
49. Right in Frame
50. Size
51. Soft
52. Underexposed
53. Vignetting

54. Photo upload FAQ
55. Tips for newcomers


Changelog:
13-07-2019 - Creation of thread. Subarticles will follow. After completion, this changelog will be used to communicate changes that have been made. Until finished, this thread should not be used yet as guideline.
20-07-2019 - Thread open for feedback.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sat Jul 13, 2019 7:53 pm

Priority screening guidelines


General notes:
- Priority screening is given up to 24 hours after the first photo was added.
- Only the first photos will be added to the banner, to reward those who come to Airlines.net first.
- Crops of aircraft do not qualify for priority screening.
- All of the below priority guidelines are at screener discretion and subject to change.

The following subjects will be given priority screening and will qualify for a news banner on the front page:
- New type of aircraft.
- New type of aircraft for an airline - in full scheme, including sub-types, i.e. 737-700, 737-900.
- First flight for 1 of the above.
- New cabin design.
- New color scheme for an airline, including different types and sub-types, i.e. 737-700, 737-900.
- New special colors (i.e. retro jets, logo jets, colorful one-offs), including sub-types, i.e. 737-700, 737-900.
- New type for an armed force.
- New colorful special for a military aircraft (including tail only, even not highly visible, including camo).

The following subjects will be given priority screening, but will NOT qualify for a news banner on the front page:
- New type of aircraft for an airline - hybrid/untitled.
- New aircraft for an airline & in full scheme (new registration or manufacturer reusable registration). Museum, restored or permanent display aircraft are excluded.
- Delivery flights of new aircraft/registration for airline in full scheme.
- Registrations/serials that are new to the database. Museum/restored/permanent display aircraft are excluded from this, as well as crops of new registrations/serials.
- Major Airshows (Paris, Farnborough, Berlin, Dubai, MAKS only!). NOTE: priority will only be given during show days.
- Accident or incident (accident or incident must be visible in the picture. Burst tires or missing winglets etc. do not qualify). After a crash, we will only accept pictures where the crash is visible in the picture. We will not priority accept shots of the aircraft in question taken before the crash.


As per December 2017, the following changes have been made to the priority rules (listed in a Question/Answer format):

Q: Sometimes we see 1st flight shots, but the aircraft is on the ground with all the gears (take-off roll), like a static shot. Is it acceptable?
A: Priority submissions of a first flight will now have to be rotation or airborne photos.

Q: New type or new registration for an airline in all white color but with title. It is ok?
A: This is OK.

Q: Business, helicopter or single engine AC with new paint? Priority or not?
A: These will be screened as priority.

Q: When is a new sticker large enough to qualify for priority?
A: Anything larger than say the span of 3 windows (not the actual windows, but from far side to far side with the space of 3 windows in between). This is also applicable for small changes in a (special) livery.

In addition, we now offer priority screening to local newsworthy events. This also includes newsworthy first visits to your airport. Basically, any type of movement that is the talk of the town. To further increase your chances and since we are not always aware of the things that might be happening at your local place, we really need you to write a comment to the screeners with an explanation as to why you think the photo should be screened with priority. For these local priority photos, it is our intention to also offer more social media exposure to them (but no banner). Sometimes this may be with a delay due to time zone differences of the crew.

In an attempt to give further guidance to this addition, you will find some examples and the answers to them below:

Q: Inaugural flights of new service, as mentioned (e.g. the first flight of a new route of note)?
A: Yes.

Q: Final flights of otherwise ordinary jets (e.g. the last flight of an airline at an airport)?
A: No (unless with ceremonial salute).

Q: Rare visits from head of states or foreign dignitaries (e.g. Air Force One or other head of state jets in areas not usually expecting them)?
A: Yes.

Q: Sporting event charters (e.g. playoff jets)?
A: Yes.

Q: Rare military jet visits (e.g. fighters showing up at a civil airport that rarely sees them)?
A: Yes.

Q: Diversions of jets from other airports due to weather or other events (e.g. international widebodies stopping by BDL when JFK has nasty weather)?
A: Yes.

Q: Unusual visitors due to mechanical substitutions (e.g. a widebody sub coming in to pick up slack after cancelled flights)?
A: Yes.

Q: New additions to local air museums (e.g. events adding a major exhibit or completion of a restoration)?
A: No.

Q: Media events (e.g. 787 Dream Tour visits)?
A: Yes (banner for the first flight of the tour).

Q: The opening of a new terminal area for airport overviews?
A: Yes.

Q: Would scheduled special events for touring flying museums qualify?
A: No.

Q: About being the "talk of the town" does it need to be among avgeeks or the general population? I've a few pictures of an aircraft that received press attention and even front page of the main journal, does it qualify to priority?
A: Yes.

Q: About diversions, one airline that never landed at the airport qualify?
A: Yes.

Please note though that these are guidelines and sometimes exceptions to the above will be made. In some cases (e.g. if priority for airshows change) it will be announced in the Photography subforum. Alternatively, any other questions/examples may have been answered in the initial thread already: viewtopic.php?f=7&t=1380237
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sat Jul 13, 2019 8:08 pm

Boeing customer codes


Boeing have dropped the 2-digit airline code from its model type for the current build Boeing 737, 747, 767, & 777 as of August/September 2016.

B737 - From line number 6082 now known as either 737-800, 737-900, or 737-900ER
B747 - From line number 1534 now known as either 747-8I (Intercontinental) or 747-8F (Freighter)
B767 - From line number 1102 now known as 767-300F (only Freighters in current production)
B777 - from line number 1422 now known as 777-300/ER or 777-F (Freighter)
The 737 MAX models will be known as 737-7, 737-8, & 737-9, bringing the numbering convention into line with the B787's.

The editors have created the following new additions to the DB:

(Generic > Version)
Boeing 737-9 > Boeing 737-9 Max
Boeing 737-900 (BBJ3) > Boeing 737-900
Boeing 737-900 (BBJ3) > Boeing 737-900/ER
Boeing 747-8 > Boeing 747-8F
Boeing 747-8 > Boeing 747-8I
Boeing 767-300 > Boeing 767-300F
Boeing 777-200 > Boeing 777-F
Boeing 777-300 > Boeing 777-300/ER

The Boeing 737-800 version and Boeing 737-8 generic plus versions already existed in the DB. The Boeing 737-9 is a new Generic Type to the DB. Please note there is of course still a difference between the 737-8 and 737-800 (also goes for 737-9 and 737-900). Please upload any photos of new Boeing aircraft as per the above.

Any feedback/comments on this specific topic may be posted in the original thread: viewtopic.php?f=7&t=1353727
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 5:46 am

Types of images we accept


Airplanes
Any and all airplanes, on the ground or in flight are acceptable. This includes civil and military aircraft. That includes gliders, ultralights and homebuilts.
Not allowed are r/c models or other scale mock ups. Full scale mock ups are allowed but they have to be of existing aircraft (i.e. a mock up of a futuristic aircraft even at real scale is not allowed).

Airports
We accept pictures of airfields (including heliports), including runways, terminal buildings (inside and outside) and control towers.
We do not accept pictures of hangars (only if the image also contains an aircraft), office buildings or any other airport installations., like radar towers, beacons or approach lights.

Space Vehicles
All images in this category should be vehicles designed to leave the earth's atmosphere and travel into space (nominally 100km above the earth's surface). The vehicle's primary role should be to travel through space/atmosphere without contact to the ground (eg the Space Shuttle is allowed but the Mars Rover tracked vehicle is not allowed).
Primarily the category is intended for vehicles which are piloted by, or transport, a life-form (eg a Space Shuttle carries a crew of people, early Russian experimental rockets carried dogs). Images of non-living-payload vehicles are permitted (such as Arianne/Saturn rockets), however it is preferred that such vehicles are depicted in their entirety. Images solely depicting ancillary objects such as dispensed rocket-tanks, rocket engine components, payload, astronauts, etc are generally not permitted. Missiles are specifically not allowed, and any rockets should be nominally 25m or greater in height. Re-entry capsules, habitation vehicles ("space station"), atmosphere-contained space research vehicles (eg early Buran prototypes), etc are all allowed.

Balloons/Blimps
Any and all balloons (blimps) are allowed as long as they can carry persons.

Ekranoplanes and hovercraft
Ekranoplanes are allowed. Hovercraft are not allowed.

Helicopters
We accept all helicopters including autogyros and tiltrotor aircraft.

UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles)
We accept a limited number of UAVs, which must have a MTOW of 1,000 lbs (450 kg) and be reusable.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 6:03 am

Uploading your photo


To upload a photo, press the “choose file” button on the upload page to find the image file you want to upload from your hard drive.

For a smooth experience, please:
- Make sure that the file is in JPEG format (filename ends with .jpeg or .jpg).
- The minimum/maximum sizes are listed above the “choose file” button. Please familiarize yourself with these values.


Photo upload limits
1 - 5 images in the database: 2 upload slots
6 - 10 images in the database: 5 upload slots
11 - 100 images in the database: 10 upload slots
101 - 500 images in the database: 15 upload slots
501 - 1000 images in the database: 20 upload slots
>1000 images in the database: 40 upload slots
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 6:49 am

Watermark


The watermark now gives the photographer more freedom regarding opacity, color and location.

Color: You can only use a light colored watermark.
Size: Small / Medium / Large.
Opacity: Choose the strength of your watermark, ranging from 10% (weakest) to 100% (strongest). In between, you have options by steps of 10%.
Horizontal Position: Choose the horizontal position of your watermark (Left / Center / Right).
Vertical Position: Choose the vertical position of your watermark (Top / Middle / Bottom).
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 6:52 am

Autocomplete


Type in the registration of the aircraft you are about to upload and/or the three or four letter code of the airport where you shot the photo. We will use our database to try to find the correct Country, Location, Aircraft, Aircraft Generic, Airline, C/N and Code. If the database returns more than one result, please choose the correct entry that fits your photo.

When using this quick method, it is very important that you know what you are doing. We have standardized names for almost all aircraft and airlines that exist. If you choose an incorrect aircraft or airline name your upload may be rejected..

Note: You are required to use the autocomplete function whenever you have access to the aircraft registration.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 6:53 am

Not an aircraft?


Please tick the “No” box if your photo is not of an aircraft (e.g. Airport Overviews).
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 6:54 am

Aircraft


NOTE: The below should only be done if the autocomplete function does not list the aircraft type and version! If the autocomplete doesn't know the manufacturer, generic type and version, choose the Aircraft Manufacturer, Generic Type, and Version from the three dropdown menus. The menus are connected (sequentially-dependent), so you must first choose the Aircraft Manufacturer from the first menu; this then allows you to choose the Generic Type from the second menu, which in turn allows you to proceed to choose the Version from the third menu.

If this trick still does not work, try to disable the Aircraft Manufacturer Filter. In most cases, you will then find the correct entries for the make and model.

For example:
The correct entry for a Jabiru J430 can not be found with the filter enabled. When you tick the 'no' box to disable the filter, you will only see the type and version field. In the type field, start typing 'Jabiru' and the dropdown list shows up Select the correct entry. In this case, the correct entry is 'Jabiru J-430'. Once you have selected the generic type, the dropdown menu for the version will show up. Please select the correct entry from that list to complete this part of the upload.

When the manufacturer is listed, but you cannot find the generic aircraft type in its dropdown menu: tick the "New Entry" box and fill in the generic aircraft type in the Non-listed generic type field, and the version in the Non-listed version field.

When the manufacturer and generic type are listed, but you cannot find the version in its dropdown menu: tick the "New Entry” box and type the version in the version field. If there is more than one aircraft in the photo, list the data for the aircraft you wish to be the focus of the photo. Only list one aircraft! Other aircraft should be mentioned in the Remark field. When you are not sure about a generic type or version, choose in the dropdown menu the entry with the dots. Adding new entries should only be done when you are absolutely sure that the correct generic type and/or version can not be found! Please note that when adding a new version, the manufacturer should always be included.

Examples:
1. Ilyushin Il-62 is a designation used as a generic type for all versions of the Il-62, but the first version built is also designated just Il-62, without suffix. To make a clear distinction between the generic type and the version, when you don't know the version, choose "Il-62...", when you know it is the first version without suffix, choose "Il-62". Please adhere to this to make the supplied information reliable.

2. When adding a new version:
Incorrect
- generic type: Bell
- version: 212
Correct
- generic type: Bell
- version: Bell 212


NOTE: Not all aircraft types have yet been overhauled, so for several entries the generic type is still the same as the version for the time being. You can amend this where necessary.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 6:54 am

Builder


The builder field should only be used for license-built aircraft. Examples of this are the Fokker F-16 (manufacturer is Lockheed Martin) and the Reims 172 (manufacturer is Cessna). Aircraft that are not license-built should have the builder field empty. For example, Boeing and Airbus aircraft are not license built, so they should always have the builder field empty.

When in doubt, please leave this field empty. It can also happen that the autocomplete function incorrectly provides builder input. We aim to have everything corrected, but can’t always work that fast. So if you see an error regarding this, please remove the entry from your upload. If the autocomplete function does not list the builder but it is applicable, use the dropdown menu to select the aircraft manufacturer. If it is not listed, tick the “New Entry” box and add the manufacturer in the ”Builder” field.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 6:55 am

Airline


Select Airline from the airline dropdown menu. When you start typing the name in the airline field, the dropdown menu will show all existing entries that match your input. Please select the correct entry from the list. If you cannot find the airline in the dropdown menu, tick the “New Entry” box and type the name in the airline field, adhering to the standards listed below. Please remember that one character or space that is different from the upload list means a separate distinct entry in the Photo Index, causing your photo not to turn up in most database searches.

Civil aircraft without titles shall always be listed as “Untitled”. Only if operated by an airline, the airline name shall be listed too, between brackets. See para. 4, 5 and 12 below.

1. Airline aircraft with titles will be listed with the full airline name, like "Virgin Atlantic Airways".
2. Airline aircraft with titles of two companies will be listed with both companies, whereby the most prominent one comes first, and the minor one will be between brackets, like "Delta Connection (Skywest Airlines)". Although names like "Team Lufthansa" are not really "companies", on Airliners.net we consider them as companies.
3. Airline aircraft with titles of one company, but owned by and/or operated by another airline company whose titles are not worn, will be listed with both companies, but with the untitled one between brackets, like "America West Express (Mesa Airlines). Leasing companies, banks, trust companies, finance houses and such will not be listed, unless they are painted on the aircraft.
4. Airline aircraft which are untitled will be listed as "Untitled" with the airline name between brackets, like "Untitled (TMA - Trans Mediterranean Airlines)", or "Untitled (America West Express (Mesa Airlines))".
5. Untitled aircraft not operated by an airline or charter company, but owned by private persons, business companies, flying clubs, aircraft sale companies, broker companies, warbird operators, flying museums, etc. will be listed as "Untitled", without something following between brackets. If you want to supply owner or operator details these shall be listed in the Remarks field. In some cases the database standardization editors can make exceptions to this convention.
6. Aircraft not operated by airlines or charter companies, but nevertheless carrying owner or operator titles, will be listed with that name, like e.g. "Waterford Aero Club".
7. Aircraft which are "Ex airline XXX" will be listed as under points 1 to 10 whichever is appropriate, with the ex-details in the Remarks field.
8. Military aircraft will be listed as "country name, space, dash, space, service", like "Argentina - Air Force", or "Denmark - Army". Most of the names are in the upload list. Do not use air force names like "Royal Air Force", and do not add unit details to the name like "USA - Air Force 55TAS", these belong in the Remarks field. Note: "Air Force" is also used for countries with combined Armed Forces like Canada, etc.
9. Government aircraft WITHOUT military roundels AND carrying a civil registration, will be listed as under points 1 to 10, whichever is appropriate and further down the upload page the category "government" has to be selected. Government aircraft WITH military roundels AND/OR a non-civil registration, will be listed as under point 8, and not the category "government" has to be selected, but the category "military".
10. When distinctive variations of airline names are used, they will be listed with these distinctive names as e.g. "KLM Asia", "Lufthansa Express", or "British Airways Manchester".
11. When the airline name has the additional title "Cargo", they will be listed like that, like "British Airways Cargo".
12. Untitled aircraft of fractional ownership companies can (when you know the name) be listed the same way as for airline aircraft under point 4, like "Untitled (Flight Options)".
13. Aircraft in special color schemes like "Wunala Dreaming", or promoting an event, like "Salt Lake 2002" will not have those paint schemes mentioned in the airline name, but they can be mentioned in the Remarks field. These aircraft will thus be listed as (in this case) just "Qantas" and "Delta Connection (ASA - Atlantic Southeast Airlines)" respectively. Further down the upload page, tick the category "Special" box.
14. Airline aircraft with (additional) titles promoting a non-airline business, like the "McDonald's" MD-80, will be listed with the airline name only (like in this case Crossair), even when the airline name is not painted on the aircraft. The promoted company can be listed in the Remarks. Additionally, the category "Special" has to be selected further down the upload page.
15. However, for non-airline aircraft with promotion titles, these promotion titles will be listed as the "airline" name, like "Fuji". For non-airline aircraft the category "Special" may NOT be chosen, because that category is only for airliners (see the Help item for that category).
16. The database standardization editors can make exceptions to the above standards when a special situation occurs. An example is e.g. some BEX - Business Express aircraft. Although the titles "BEX - Business Express" are bigger than the titles "Delta Connection", and thus the airline should be listed according to point 2 as "BEX - Business Express (Delta Connection)", the names have been reversed here by the editors to "Delta Connection (BEX - Business Express)" to be consistent with all the other Delta Connection titles.
17. Aircraft painted with titles to commemorate an older airline name shall be listed with those titles, with the real company between brackets, like e.g. "Trans Canada Air Lines (Air Canada)". This is only valid for actively flying aircraft, not for static museum ones. The static museum ones will be listed with the commemorative name only, without the museum name.
18. Aircraft that have different titles on each side, or titles on one side only, shall be listed with the titles (or "Untitled") of the side of the aircraft that is shown in the photo. When the photo is really head-on, or taken straight above or below the aircraft, then just take one of the two, it doesn't matter which one.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 6:56 am

Identification numbers


MSN/CN
The construction number (c/n), also known as manufacturer's serial number (msn), is the permanent identity of an aircraft assigned by the manufacturer. The c/n can be found on the c/n plate somewhere in or on the aircraft. Except for some total rebuilds the c/n is normally not changed during the lifetime of an aircraft, in contrast with the registration. For establishing the history of a particular aircraft through its multiple registrations it is of the utmost importance to know the c/n.

For the format of the c/n you can consult entries that are already in our database, or you can list them as published in national registers or established reference sources. However, these sources are not always consistent, and the database editors will change them to a standard form if necessary. And when you are a seasoned aircraft historian and you know that the c/n hasn't been discovered by serious researchers, and the aircraft has no US or British military identity, you may insert "unknown". Filling-in of this field is optional, but it is really appreciated when you do an effort to find the c/n and list it, as the c/n is a great tool for cross-referencing and for historical research. When you don't know the c/n, leave the field blank.

LN
For Boeing and Douglas jet airliners, the line number (ln) shall also be included. These line numbers are assigned by the manufacturer to indicate the position of the aircraft on the production line, while construction numbers for these aircraft are normally assigned when a batch of aircraft is ordered, the c/n’s are rarely reflecting the order of production. However, the line numbers are not an official part of the c/n, and therefore they are not listed in national registers.

MIL SN
Some aircraft built for the military in the United States and the United Kingdom were never allocated a Manufacturer Serial Number. Instead, their USAF/USN/RAF serial (tail number) also became the airframe's identity, taking the place of the MSN. If that is the case, please leave the MSN field blank and use this field to list its original USAF/USN/RAF serial.

MIL SN [P]
Use this field to list a serial that is painted on the aircraft, but is not the actual serial.

Registration/Serial
Type the registration (also known as tail number) of the aircraft pictured. List only one registration. If there are more than one aircraft in the photo, type the registration of the most visible aircraft (the registration(s) of the other(s) can be mentioned in the caption field). By including the registration you will significantly increase your chances of having the photo accepted if it's a bordercase. Use capitals only, and use the standard format for the country concerned, like e.g. G-BNMH, SE-ARO, HK-2400X, A4O-PA, HL5645.

For the United States the form is e.g. N12345 and not N-12345, for Japan JA1234 and not JA-1234, for Russia RA-12345 and not RA12345, etc. Even when it is painted wrongly on the aircraft use the standard form only.

For military aircraft, list the serial in the registration field and the additional code if any in the code field. USAF and US Army aircraft are listed with the full serial including the fiscal year, e.g. 43-12453 or 85-0035, for the US Navy use the full six-digit BuAer number, e.g. 160457.

German serials are listed without the "+", e.g. 4375 instead of 43+75.
Spanish serials are listed without the dot, e.g. TK10-11 instead of TK.10-11.
Brazilian serials are listed without "FAB" as e.g. 5530 unless it forms part of the serial and is painted on the same line as e.g. FAB-1394.
French military and semi-military aircraft except the Navy: use the small number on the fin (which is often the c/n) as the registration and insert the squadron code in the code field. E.g. the small "109" on the fin is the registration, the larger "12-KF" is the code. French Navy aircraft only have a number which is the registration.
Italian serials: use the small MM prefixed serials as the registration and insert the squadron codes in the code field, e.g. the (very) small MM6768 is the registration, 36-05 is the code.

Other air forces: list in general the serial as painted on the aircraft. When your photo is depicting an airfield or another subject not being an aircraft, leave this field blank. If your photo depicts an aircraft but you don't know the nationality and the registration, list the registration with five stars as *****. When you know the registration partly, list the details you know and fill the rest up with stars, e.g. N*****, D-A***, SE-***, PH-BD*, N5**DA, HB-JA*, 85-018*, A97-***, etc.

REG [P]
Use this field to list a registration that is painted on the aircraft, but is not the actual registration. Example:
There is a Dutch Douglas DC-2 that has “PH-AJU” painted on top of the wings. Its actual registration is NC39165 however. In this case, PH-AJU is the REG [P] and NC39165 the registration.

Code
This field shall be used for codes. Many military aircraft carry them in addition to the serial (registration) to indicate an identity within a unit, or to indicate the home base.

Other codes that shall be listed in this field are fleet numbers for civil aircraft when they carry them, show codes for e.g. the Paris and Hannover Air Shows, race- or rally numbers, or any other identity not being a registration, construction number, or name on the outside of the aircraft (so, no SELCAL codes). Individual names painted on aircraft like e.g. "City of Melbourne" shall be listed in the Remarks field if you want to include them.

They shall be listed in the form as painted on the aircraft (so e.g. a warbird carrying fake USAAF serial 463864 shall not be listed as 44-63864, but as 463864, except when they have the data block below the cockpit with the full serial, then the full serial shall be listed). When a warbird carries both a fake serial and a code, they shall both be listed (e.g. a warbird with US Navy markings carrying serial 136464 and code 7D-464 shall be listed in the code field as 136464/7D-464).

Do not put any words in this field like code or fleet number and such. If the aircraft has no code, leave the field blank.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:06 am

Location (country/region/location)


Country
When you know the code of the airfield, please use the autocomplete feature. If the code is known to our database, you will then automatically get the correct country and airfield name. But always verify that the entry is correct. If you don't know the code, or the code is not present in the database, please add it manually;

Select the country in which you took the photo from the dropdown menu. All countries are listed here. Select the location. Note: the country dropdown menu is connected to the location dropdown menu. When you select a country, the location dropdown menu will display airports within that country. When the photo has not been taken in/ flying over a country, use the entry "International Airspace" from the country dropdown menu. In the location menu, please select the option that is the best fit to your photo.

If the location where you took the photo is not listed in the dropdown menu, you can manually add it by clicking the “New Entry” box and writing the name of the location in the field. Please read below on how you should add the location.

Location
When you know the code of the airfield, please use the autocomplete feature. If the code is known to our database, you will then automatically get the correct country and airfield name. But always verify that the entry is correct.

If you don't know the code, or the code is not present in the database, please use the dropdown menus. You must have selected the appropriate country before you can select the location. The location dropdown menu will display airports within that country. There are four possibilities to list a location:

1. Unknown
2. In Flight
3. Airport name
4. location name [OFF-AIRPORT]

Please read below for an explanation on how to add a location manually. When you have made the photo while being on the ground, use the following:
- When your photo has been made at an airfield, heliport, or seaplane base, select the airport, heliport, or seaplane base from the dropdown menu. Please be aware that the airfield you are looking for is listed in the dropdown menu under the city name, e.g. looking for "Travis AFB" you have to look under "Fairfield". Do not make any change to a location listed in the dropdown menu, and do not use your own version of listed airfields, because then your picture will not appear in all database searches.

If you cannot find the proper location in the dropdown menu, tick the “New Entry” box and type the name in the "Location" field. If you have to use the "Location" field, use the format:

City name followed by space dash space, the airport name, and between brackets the IATA code, space slash space and the ICAO code. Do not add the word "Airport" or "Airfield".

Example:
"Amsterdam - Schiphol (AMS / EHAM)".

Locations directly bordering an airfield shall also be listed with the airport name. For heliports and seaplane bases, add the word "Heliport" or "Seaplane".

Examples:
"Barrie - Royal Victoria Hospital Heliport"
"Timmins - Porcupine Lake Seaplane"
When your picture has not been made at an airfield, heliport, or seaplane base, but e.g. at an off-airport exhibition, an off-airport museum, a helicopter off-heliport, etc., use the format:

" Appropriate name of the city, lake, sea, river, area, etc. + [OFF-AIRPORT]" .

Examples:
- Los Angeles [OFF-AIRPORT]
- Mont Blanc [OFF-AIRPORT]
- Pacific Ocean [OFF-AIRPORT]
- Lake Okeechobee [OFF-AIRPORT]
- Cochrane area [OFF-AIRPORT]

When you are photographing an overflying aircraft from an airport, but the aircraft doesn't belong to the airfield traffic (e.g. a contrail) use "Off-Airport" too. When you made the photo while you were airborne, use the following:
- When there is no airfield, heliport, or seaplane base visible in your photo, use "In Flight" from the dropdown menu without any further addition.
- When there is an airfield, heliport, or seaplane base visible in your photo, use the appropriate format for listing airfields, e.g. "London - Heathrow (LHR / EGLL)".
- When you don't know where you took the photo, use "Unknown" from the dropdown menu.

NEVER add any additional info (behind the hangar, on runway 24, at Elmdon Street, etc) to these location entries,. Such information should go in the caption field.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:06 am

Date


Choose the date when the photo was taken. If you do not know the exact day or month, you can leave them as 'Unknown' by ticking the “Unknown Month/Day” box. Please note that we do require a full date as much as possible and we reserve the right to reject a photo if we think the date is being omitted without a valid reason.

If a full date is not possible for whatever reason, please inform us of this (and the reason why) by writing it in the “comment to screener” box at the bottom of the upload page. If you do not know the exact year when you took the photo, tick the “Unknown Year” box. A dropdown menu will appear. Please try to select the option that comes closest regarding your photo.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:07 am

Categories


Tick the correct boxes for the categories that are applicable to your photo.

Main Subject
Tick the correct box that matches your photo.

Owner

Military
Check this box if the aircraft on the photo has military nationality markings (roundel, star-and-bar, cross, etc) or a non-civil registration.

IMPORTANT NOTE:
- If the aircraft has military nationality markings but is flown or preserved with a civil registration, i.e. masquerading as a military aircraft, choose Warbird instead (see there).
- If the aircraft is/was ferried from a former military operator to a new civil operator with a civil registration but where they "forgot" to overpaint the military nationality markings for the ferry flight, do not choose Military or Warbird, but choose another appropriate category instead.
- The Military category also includes coastguard, police or other semi-military or government aircraft from certain countries where such aircraft are marked with non-civil registrations.

Business
Check this box if the photo is picturing a business jet. That includes just about any business jet that is privately or corporately owned (including those used by fractional ownership companies).

Warbird
Check this box if the photo is picturing a civil registered aircraft carrying military nationality marks, i.e. masquerading as a military aircraft. These can be former military aircraft, but also e.g. homebuilts which have been painted with military nationality markings for fun.
Be aware that British warbird aircraft are exempted from carrying their civil registration on the outside, and only research can reveal the civil registration with which they should be listed. In other countries the real civil registration is often very small and placed under the tailplane. When that is in the shadow it is often not readable on a photo. Only aircraft with existing military nationality markings will be listed as warbirds, aircraft with fictitious "military nationality" markings will not.

NOTE:
An exception for listing as a warbird are civil-registered aircraft carrying military nationality markings which are operated by a manufacturer or sales organization for demonstration or test flights. E.g a Boeing 737 with Venezuelan Air Force markings test flying with Boeing with a civil registration will not be listed as a warbird. Also, a civil-registered SIAI S-211 at the Paris Air Show carrying USAF markings for demonstration and promotion purposes will also not be listed as a warbird. Ex-military aircraft (like e.g. Spitfires, B-17s, Hunters, etc) that are civil registered but that do not carry military nationality markings shall NOT be listed as Warbird.

Private
Mark this box if the aircraft on the photo is privately or corporately owned and does not fit into the Warbird, Business or other category.

Government
Mark this box if the aircraft on the photo is a government aircraft WITHOUT military nationality markings AND carrying a civil registration. This includes certain VIP aircraft, aircraft with NASA markings, police, fire departments, etc.

NOTE: If a government aircraft HAS military nationality markings AND/OR a non-civil registration, choose Military instead.

Cargo
Mark this box if the aircraft on the photo is a cargo aircraft in opposite to a passenger carrying aircraft.

Airline/Other
Mark this box for anything that does not fit into the other categories (like normal airliners)

Paint
Colorful/Special Paint
This category is for special one-off color schemes, where the whole aircraft or at least the larger part of it (or for military aircraft at least the whole fin) is painted in a special, mostly temporary, color scheme. These schemes can be just for fun or to commemorate something, or the colors of a sponsor or advertiser.

We don't set strict boundaries for this category, but we expect that you use common sense to decide which aircraft belong in it. Please note: the category shall only be used for airliners and for military aircraft.

Please do NOT include:
The British Airways or PIA tail color schemes.
The Star Alliance color schemes.
Very colourful aircraft that are nevertheless in the standard, or one of the standard schemes of an airline.
Out of service aircraft in colour schemes that were never carried when in service.
Aircraft in the house colors of military demonstration teams like the Patrouille de France, Thunderbirds, Swifts, Blue Angels, Frecce Tricolori, Snowbirds, Russian Knights, Asas de Portugal, Patrulla Aguila, etc.
Two-airline hybrid schemes
For a pictorial explanation, see post in Photography Forum - https://www.airliners.net/aviation-foru ... in/267742/

Manufacturer Paint
Mark this box if the aircraft is painted in house colors, in other words that it's painted in the colors of its manufacturer and without airline markings. (like Boeing or Airbus colors)

Normal/Other Paint
Mark this box for normal paint schemes, old or new.

View
Cockpit
Mark this box if the subject of the photo is a cockpit (flight deck). This means that an interesting part of instruments must be visible and not just the upper edge of the instrument panel or a black window frame. When this box is marked the aircraft details in the photo caption must be those of the cockpit aircraft.

Cabin/Cargo Hold
Mark this box if the photo is picturing the inside the cabin / cargo hold of an aircraft. If it's picturing the cockpit, mark the Flight Deck category instead.

Tail/Winglet
Mark this box if the photo is picturing a closeup of one or more tails or winglets. This only applies to airliners.

Nose
Mark this checkbox if the photo is picturing a closeup of an aircraft nose. Note that this does not include photos picturing the front half of an aircraft. This only applies to airliners.

Window
A shot from inside the aircraft cabin through the window.

If parts of the aircraft (wing) are included, list the details of the aircraft (type, airline, registration, cn, code) in the appropriate fields.

If the photo shows an airport and also parts of the aircraft, list the aircraft details and additionally mark the Airport Overview category too.

If no parts of the aircraft are included, but the subject of the photo is an airport, do not use Window View, but mark Airport Overview only, mark the aircraft and airline field with a minus (-), and leave the registration, cn and code fields blank. The basic rule in this case is: list the details of the subject of the photo, not FROM where you made the photo (listing aircraft details in this case would result in the viewer seeing a picture of an airport while he clicked on and expected to see a photo of an aircraft type or airline, etc.).

If some other aircraft (e.g. air-to-air) is the main subject of the photo, list the details of that other aircraft, and do NOT select the category Window View.

Normal/Other
Mark this box for anything that does not fit into the other categories (most photos).

Other
Airport Overview
Mark this box if the photo is showing an airport either inside or outside. If aircraft is included in the photo, write the name and airline in the respective fields. If no aircraft is clearly visible, mark the aircraft and airline field with a minus (-).

If the airport overview is shot from an aircraft but no major part of the aircraft is visible, mark the aircraft and airline fields with a minus (-) and type the name of the aircraft and airline in the remark field.

Preserved
Mark this box if the photo is picturing a non-flying aircraft preserved in a museum, a collection, as a gate guard or monument, or in use as a bar/restaurant/nightclub/disco, or as an instructional airframe at a technical school.

So, an aircraft in a scrapyard, or abandoned in the corner of a field, or used as a fire brigade burn trainer, or stored pending a decision on their future, are NOT preserved aircraft. Aircraft that are displayed in a museum, but that are now and then taken out for flying, shall be listed as Preserved for those photos where they are displayed in the museum. For those photos where the aircraft is outside the museum for flying, the category Preserved shall NOT be chosen. This means that the same aircraft can have the category Preserved for some photos, and for some other photos not.

Seaplane
Mark this box if the aircraft can land and take-off in water (including helicopters).

Accident/Incident
Mark this box if the photo is depicting a crash, accident or incident or the photo is showing the damage caused by a crash, accident or incident.

Classic Airliner
Mark this box if the aircraft is older or as old as the 707 (1958). Note that this does NOT include the 707

Air-to-Air
Mark this box if your photo is of an airborne aircraft, while you were also airborne.

Last Built
Mark this box if the exact aircraft pictured is the last built of its particular type.

First Built
Mark this box if the exact aircraft pictured is the first built of its particular type.

Night/Dusk/Dawn
Mark this box if the sun was below the horizon when you took the photo.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:07 am

Caption/Remark


In this field you can write any info regarding the photo that you would like to share, but please only stick to relevant info. All captions should be in the English language.

Not allowed in this field are:
- URLs
- Hit-seeking comments (remarks about waving pilots, etc.)
- Dedications to your friends and relatives
- Derogatory comments
- Other irrelevant information

The crew reserves the right to remove sentences if they break any of the above rules.
Note: The registration number goes in the registration field, not the caption field.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:08 am

Comment to screeners


Use this field to write a note to the screeners. For example if there are certain things we should take into account when screening your photo (new registration, rarity, other info that may be of help understanding why you did something a certain way).

It is also recommended to use this field when you are re-uploading a photo after a rejection. In those cases, please also state the issues you fixed.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:36 am

Banding


Banding is a phenomenon that usually occurs in a cloudless or overcast sky. It means that there is striping visible. This can be in a horizontal, diagonal, or arcing (up-/downward direction). Often the 'bands' have a slight color difference. Think of it as a rainbow, but with only small color differences. It is a result of overediting (usually in combination with strong noise reduction and/or color/clarity/SH-tool tweaks) and can not always be fixed. But often, a new and more careful edit can fix it.

Example:

Image

NOTE: the right 1/3rd of the image has been equalized in Photoshop to show the banding more clearly.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:37 am

Blurry


This might be caused by motion blur from trying to track a fast moving object with low shutterspeeds, or by inadequate post-processing of the image.

Look carefully at your original digital image or slide. If it is sharper than the uploaded file, you might try using a photo editing program to sharpen the images, using the Unsharp Mask tool. If your photo has a high resolution you might want to try reducing the size. This will mask any minor blurriness. If the original image is not sharper then the version you uploaded, this image can probably not be saved.

Example 1: Blurry. This image is a good example of blurriness caused by a low shutterspeed.

Image
Larger version

Since blurry images often cannot be improved, note what happens to the image when we try to improve it by sharpening it in example 2 (below).

Image
Larger version


Note how some parts of the image now look sharp. However it mostly appears over-sharpened, especially the registration.

It's a common error to try and save blurry images by sharpening. This will then result in an oversharpened rejection. Again we stress that you look carefully at the original image and check if it's in focus. If it is, then the blurry rejection may have been caused by improper editing. If the original is not in focus the image can probably not be saved as we have noted in the example above.

If you get many blurry rejections please ask for advice in the feedback forum. Your camera may be broken or your shooting technique might be underdeveloped. Shooting at low (1/250th or slower) shutterspeeds often results in blurry images. You may also get a blurry rejection when the Depth of Field in your images is too shallow. Generally we prefer images that have a very high Depth of Field unless there is a specific motive for having a shallow DOF.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:37 am

Borders


Your photo(s) were partly or fully surrounded by light or dark borders.

These borders can be caused by rotating the picture in order to get it levelled and afterwards not checking the corners and cutting them off in a proper way. You can remove these unwanted borders by carefully cropping the photo. Another source of the problem can be the sharpening of the picture. In these cases you can solve the problem by making the canvas size smaller as final step of your processing.

If you think you have been able to improve the photos, please re-upload them. Do not forget to include a note to the screeners, detailing what you have done to improve the image. There is a special field available for such notes. Please note that we are still very interested in having these photos in our database, we only ask that you try to improve the quality of the images as much as possible.

This is an example of what an image with a border looks like (black border, bottom & left side of the photo).

Example:

Image

Note that in Photoshop (or similar) it's best to set your canvas color to something that stands out from the edges of the photo. This will make it easier to spot.

Another often-seen border issue is a thin border along the edge of all or some sides of the frame. Below is an example of that (a little exaggerated, usually it is less thick):

Image
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:38 am

Category


When uploading these photo(s) you either selected the wrong categories or you neglected to select certain categories that should have been selected. Selecting the correct categories is very important, because many features of the Airliners.net search engines depend on it.

Provided the photo quality is acceptable, we usually correct any incorrectly selected categories for you, so in general you should not receive this as a standalone rejection. If there were other rejection reasons as well, please correct them before reuploading the photo with the correct categories selected.

If you are unsure which categories apply, please read the help text on the upload page or post #15 in this thread. Note that several categories, such as special color schemes and classic aircraft, are ONLY for airliners.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:38 am

CCW Rotation


Your photo(s) require(s) counter-clockwise rotation.

This problem is caused by not keeping the camera completely level while making the photograph, and particularly applies to pictures of aircraft on the ground. For shots of aircraft in flight where the ground is visible (take-offs and landings in particular), the general rule is that the camera should be level with the horizon and the aircraft be at an angle.

A good method for checking if the photo is leveled is to check the vertical lines in the photo (buildings, lamp posts etc.) for being vertical. Try to avoid using verticals at the left or right edges of the photo, because these are often subject to lens distortion. In general, these problems can often be fixed by carefully rotating the picture until the verticals are truly vertical, and then cropping the picture. When using a wide-angle lens, use the verticals in the centre of the image to level the photo.

If you think you have been able to improve the photos, please reupload them. Do not forget to include a note to the screeners, detailing what you have done to improve the image. There is a special field available for such notes. Please note that we are still very interested in having these photos in our database, we only ask that you try to improve the quality of the images as much as possible.

Wide-angle images are often difficult to level. Most lenses have substantial distortion that makes verticals on the edges of the image unreliable. In such cases you need to level the image on the verticals in the centre portion in the image. Note that the verticals on both sides of the image will lean inward. Levelling based on these verticals would give unsatisfying results.

Note that after rotation an image may have borders. You need to recrop to get rid of them. Always redo the images completely because cropping changes the size of your image and if you do it on a 1024 pixel image you may end up with an image that is too small.

For cockpit photos, we require that either the horizon is level or the cockpit is level. In this image you would either need to apply counter clockwise rotation to level the horizon or clockwise rotation to level the cockpit. In general we want the cockpit to be level, unless the airplane can be seen banking quite steeply. If it's turning only very slightly please level on the cockpit verticals and not the horizon.

Note of caution: horizons are not always what they seem, sometimes they have slopes or perspective distorts the view. Similarly, verticals can sometimes give contradictory messages. In the difficult (rare) cases you sometimes need to apply some common sense and make sure the image 'looks' level or 'feels' level. This only applies to the most difficult of cases.


In short

When a photo is taken using a long focal length:
- Any vertical will do for a level reference
- If there are no verticals, check the horizon
- If the horizon can't be reliably judged, check if the subject looks level
- Benefit of the doubt may be given (for example when the photographer indicates that the location slopes)

When the photo is taken with a short focal length:
- Check for a middle vertical
- If there is no middle vertical, compare the horizon on both sides of the frame
- If the horizon can't be reliably judged, check if the subject looks level
- Benefit of the doubt may be given (for example when the photographer indicates that the location slopes)

When there are conflicting level indicators:
Does it look level? If yes, it will likley be fine. If not, re-edit the image so it looks level.

Notes:
- If the sea is visible on the entire horizon, then the sea should be level.
- The CW/CCW rejection indicates what the photo needs, not what it is.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:39 am

Color


There was a problem with the color in your photo(s). This may be due to one of two reasons:
- Your photo has a strong color cast that makes the photos look too red/blue/yellow etc.
- Your photo is saturated too little or too much. Over saturating is more common and causes colors to become very strong, almost neon like.

If you are using a digital camera, the incorrect colors can be a result of an improper setting of the white balance in your camera. A common cause of a color rejection is an incorrect white balance in night shots. If your night photo looks very orange than please adjust your white balance so you get an image that is more blue. Other color casts can usually be corrected using the color balance sliders in Photoshop or other image editing software.

If the image is a scan of a photo or slide, the please check your scanner settings to ensure you are using 16-bit colors or higher. You might also experience problems with poor colors if you use a too high compression level when saving your scanned jpeg files. You should also have your monitor and video card properly set up for 24 bit color or higher (usually called "true color"). Windows users can easily check this by right clicking on the desktop and looking in display settings.

If you are scanning very old pictures, particularly (but not limited to) E-6 slides more than 25 or so years old, there may be a very strong color shift. Most recent scanning and photo editing software have specific functions designed to restore the colors of old pictures.

Some examples of colorcasts:

Example 1a: Reference image with correct color
Image

Example 1b: blue/cyan cast
Image

Example 1c: yellow cast
Image

Example 1d: red/magenta cast
Image

Example 1e: green cast
Image


A color rejection could also mean your image is oversaturated or undersaturated:

Example 2a: Oversaturated
Image

Example 2b: Undersaturated
Image

Additionally you may get a color rejection if you edited your image in black and white without a proper motive. Black and white is only acceptable if it is properly motivated, i.e. the image works on another level than had it been in color.

Image


We accept Black & White images if the original medium was B&W (such as black & white film or black and white slide film). We also accept black and white images if the subject is a classic airline such as a DC3 or Convair 440, or a 737 retro jet and you want to give the image a vintage feel. As the example shows, this does not apply to modern airlines.

Finally, a color rejection may be caused by an incorrect whitebalance setting which happens most often with nightshots taken under fluorescent or tungsten lighting.

Example 4: Incorrect whitebalance
Image

The above image is straight from the camera using an auto whitebalance setting. We would reject this image for color because there is a strong orange cast caused by the tungsten lighting.

Example 5: Corrected whitebalance
Image

The above is a corrected version where the whitebalance has been changed. Note how the image has much more neutral ligting.

We strongly recommend to shoot night images in RAW/NEF format. In your RAW converter you can easily change your whitebalance whereas this is much more difficult with JPEG images. Simply change the whitebalance in your RAW converter to a cooler temperature. Be careful not to overdo it because we do not want images that are too cool or blue either.

Note:
Your photos should be saved in the sRGB color profile. If a photo is saved in AdobeRGB, it will only become apparent after acceptance. In such cases, a photo looks purple with undersaturated colors. In our screening interface, we can not distinguish sRGB from AdobeRGB photos.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:46 am

Common


The aircraft depicted in your photos was very common in the Airliners.net database, with many photos of this aircraft already present on the website. In this case the standards for acceptance are higher than for aircraft of which we have fewer or no photographs on the database, and only photos of exceptional quality will be accepted. Please understand that this is not a judgement on your abilities, as your picture may be of a technical quality which may be very decent. However, due to the common nature of the aircraft photographed, the highest standard is applied to avoid substantial duplication.

When uploading you should always check our database for the amount of photos we have of the particular aircraft you are uploading. If a particular aircraft or registration is common in our database, you may increase the likelihood your photos of it will be accepted by photographing it from an unusual angle, under exceptional lighting conditions, or with interesting scenery in the background. Note that the common rejection reason will always be given in combination with another rejection reason. This means that if your image gets rejected for "Quality" and "Common" the image is too common for the quality you provided.

We often get asked when an aircraft is common. This may vary. A general rule is usually from 100 images onwards. That number may be lower for an easyJet A319 or Southwest 737 because those are likely to be heavily photographed in the future. Similarly that number may be higher for aircraft of which only one example exists and even with 200 images can be relatively rare in our database.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:46 am

Compression

Results of compression are visible in your photo. Often this is caused by low quality settings when saving or taking your photo . Another cause may be reworking a previous edit (not starting a new edit from scratch). Every time you resave a JPG file, more detail gets lost. It is strongly recommended to use the highest quality settings (RAW) of your camera when taking photos.

Common cases of this rejection include:
- Your photo suffers from 'bleeding colors', a condition where the colors seemingly blend and don't have a clear border.
- The sky looks 'blotchy'.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:47 am

Copyright


A copyright text or graphic was added to your photo(s), we do not accept such photos. Airliners.net offers a watermark option on the upload page to increase protection against photo theft. This watermark will be added when your picture gets accepted into our database.

Regarding the copyright ownership by photographers, please refer to the Photographer paragraph below.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:47 am

CW Rotation

Your photo(s) require(s) clockwise rotation.

This problem is caused by not keeping the camera completely level while making the photograph, and particularly applies to pictures of aircraft on the ground. For shots of aircraft in flight where the ground is visible (take-offs and landings in particular), the general rule is that the camera should be level with the horizon and the aircraft be at an angle.

A good method for checking if the photo is leveled is to check the vertical lines in the photo (buildings, lamp posts etc.) for being vertical. Try to avoid using verticals at the left or right edges of the photo, because these are often subject to lens distortion. In general, these problems can often be fixed by carefully rotating the picture until the verticals are truly vertical, and then cropping the picture. When using a wide-angle lens, use the verticals in the centre of the image to level the photo.

If you think you have been able to improve the photos, please reupload them. Do not forget to include a note to the screeners, detailing what you have done to improve the image. There is a special field available for such notes. Please note that we are still very interested in having these photos in our database, we only ask that you try to improve the quality of the images as much as possible.

Wide-angle images are often difficult to level. Most lenses have substantial distortion that makes verticals on the edges of the image unreliable. In such cases you need to level the image on the verticals in the centre portion in the image. Note that the verticals on both sides of the image will lean inward. Levelling based on these verticals would give unsatisfying results.

Note that after rotation an image may have borders. You need to recrop to get rid of them. Always redo the images completely because cropping changes the size of your image and if you do it on a 1024 pixel image you may end up with an image that is too small.

For cockpit photos, we require that either the horizon is level or the cockpit is level. In this image you would either need to apply counter clockwise rotation to level the horizon or clockwise rotation to level the cockpit. In general we want the cockpit to be level, unless the airplane can be seen banking quite steeply. If it's turning only very slightly please level on the cockpit verticals and not the horizon.

Note of caution: horizons are not always what they seem, sometimes they have slopes or perspective distorts the view. Similarly, verticals can sometimes give contradictory messages. In the difficult (rare) cases you sometimes need to apply some common sense and make sure the image 'looks' level or 'feels' level. This only applies to the most difficult of cases.


In short

When a photo is taken using a long focal length:
- Any vertical will do for a level reference
- If there are no verticals, check the horizon
- If the horizon can't be reliably judged, check if the subject looks level
- Benefit of the doubt may be given (for example when the photographer indicates that the location slopes)

When the photo is taken with a short focal length:
- Check for a middle vertical
- If there is no middle vertical, compare the horizon on both sides of the frame
- If the horizon can't be reliably judged, check if the subject looks level
- Benefit of the doubt may be given (for example when the photographer indicates that the location slopes)

When there are conflicting level indicators:
Does it look level? If yes, it will likley be fine. If not, re-edit the image so it looks level.

Notes:
- If the sea is visible on the entire horizon, then the sea should be level.
- The CW/CCW rejection indicates what the photo needs, not what it is.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:48 am

Dirty


Your photo(s) had blemishes on them. If the image is from a digital single-lens reflex camera (DSLR), these blemishes may be dust spots, which are often difficult to see. They are caused by dust on the CCD/CMOS sensor of your camera. DSLR are very sensitive to the problem, because of the removable lens. To minimize this problem, always hold your camera with the lens pointing down, when changing the lens. If your camera sensor is very dirty, you will need to have it cleaned. There are ways to do this yourself, but this is not without risk. You can also ask your camera dealer.

If the image is from a regular digital camera, the blemishes are probably caused by dirt on the lens. Please clean your lens regularly.

If the image is from a scanner, the blemishes may be dust, dirt or scratches. These may have been in or on the scanner itself, or on the photo, negative or slide. Always clean negatives and slides very carefully with a high-quality brush before scanning them, but be careful not to cause any damage. If this does not help, the scanner itself may be dirty. For a flatbed scanner, use microfiber cloth and window cleaner or another appropriate glass-cleaning product to clean the scan bed. For film/slide scanners, try using compressed air to blow out any dust. Scratches cannot be cleaned, but will need to be repaired with the help of image editing software. Depending on the location and size of the scratch, this may be a very difficult task.

You might also receive this rejection, because your photo had some "hot pixels" in it. These broken pixels appear in photos taken with all kinds of digital cameras and are often only visible on relatively dark shots with a long exposure time (e.g. night shots). They will usually appear as tiny red dots.

Example:

Image

In the above example, you can clearly see the dust spot in the sky just above the cockpit windows. This is a very obvious dust spot, often they are are much less visible. That's why we always recommend to equalize your image before uploading, so you can catch and fix any dust spots you may have overlooked. Note that sometimes small birds or very small clouds can mimic dust spots. In cases where they are indistinguishable from dust spots it's best to clone them out.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:48 am

Distance


The aircraft in your photo(s) was too far in the distance, resulting in too much 'empty space' in the image. The best way to avoid this problem is to get closer to the aircraft or use a lens with a longer focal length. In some cases this problem can be corrected by cropping the image more tightly. However, severely cropping an image will always lead to a decrease in image quality. This in turn may lead to a subsequent QUALITY rejection of the corrected image.

Image

Note that there is too much dead space around the aircraft.

We only accept images where the main subject is further in the distance when the surroundings allow for it, i.e. there is a proper motive for it. In this case they do not (it's just blue sky) and the image would have to be cropped tighter. See example 2.

Image

Below are a few examples from our database where distance does not apply even though the aircraft is somewhat small in frame. We feel the following are good examples of images where the aircraft is small in frame but properly motivated so that it does not result in a distance rejection.

Acceptable motives for distance:



As with all rejection reasons, to avoid a distance rejection you need a proper motive; this can be subjective.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:48 am

Double


You already have a photo of this aircraft in the Airliners.net database that is the same as, or very similar to the proposed photo (same side, same day, same airport, same sequence, taken by you)

In certain (rare) cases you can also get this rejection if there are photos in the database that are nearly identical to the one rejected, but taken on another date by you. Examples of this are photos of stored or preserved aircraft that have not moved since you took the other photos.

Please do not upload multiple sequential shots of an aircraft during landing, taxiing or take-off, taken only a few seconds apart and showing a similar angle. Please select the best shot from the sequence and upload only that one. Images taken from different sequences such as one during landing, and another during take-off will generally not be considered as double.

For an accepted or submitted image that is nearly head or tail-on, we will generally also allow a side-on from either or both sides that is 90 degrees or more different viewing angle from the other image(s). This can apply to the same sequence (i.e. taxi, take off, landing or static display).

For air-to-air, we will allow 2 shots, as long as the composition is different (i.e. not taken 1 - 2 seconds apart). The spirit of the double rule is intended to allow different images that show a different view, composition, or otherwise tell a different story to the viewer. If images are too similar or merely a sequence separated by seconds with no compelling differences, they may be considered double at the screeners discretion.

For air-to-ground airshow, boneyard, and airport overviews, we accept both a wide view and closer crops of each of the aircraft visible in the wider view. For closer crops of structures such as terminals or concourses, they will only be allowed if there is no overlap with the wider view (i.e. the same structure is not visible in both images).

For images of space vehicle launches, we accept two images if they are of different motives (i.e. taken from different angles or remote set ups).

For window views we accept 2 photos per flight and side of aircraft when they show considerable different motives. So in other words, the maximum number of accepted window views of the same registration on the same flight all taken by you would be 4.

For cabin shots, we accept one wide view, and one close up of the seat/row for a maximum of 2 images per cabin class, per flight. If the flight should start and end on different dates, you will still be allowed only the 2 images per cabin class.

We only accept multiple cockpit shots if:
- They clearly show different parts of the cockpit.
- When the outside view is showing a different airport.
- When one is taken in daylight and one taken at night.
- One is a wide view, and the other is a well-composed close up of a specific instrument, set of gauges, screens, HUD, etc.

If too similar or sequential (such as an aircraft turning) it may be considered double, at screeners discretion. We reserve the right to add more than one image of special or unique events, even if those images might otherwise be considered double. It is at our discretion what constitutes a special event, but the belly landing of the LOT 767 is a good example.

Notes:
- This rejection might also occur if you have similar photos in the upload queue that are still awaiting final screening.
- Pick your best image! We will not delete photos later for the sake of allowing you to upload a different shot.
- If you only provide us with month/year as a date, we reserve the right to reject the image if it looks very similar to others having a month/year or a full date.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:49 am

Editing

You will receive this rejection if your image is overedited. Usually this means that you have made too many changes/tweaks during the editing of your photo.

A couple of common occurances are:
- The use of gradients (often in the sky), which we don't allow.
- Overuse of the shadow/highlights tool (or similar). This results in a very flat looking photo with little shadows. The low contrast rejection is often given as well in such cases.
- Overuse of clarity, resulting in an unnatural looking photo.

In addition, (stitched) panoramas, stacks and compositions are not accepted. HDR photos may be acceptable, as long as the outcome looks natural. This means no weird halos, no unnaturally light shadows, no ghosts (which can result from stacking multiple exposures), etc. It is up to screener discretion whether a HDR-like photo gets added. similar-looking photos may receive different screening results.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:49 am

Error


During or after uploading your photo(s), an error occurred. Please do not appeal these rejections! The second time around the problem will still be there. The only way to proceed it to upload the image again. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Similarly, if your photo does not become visible after acceptance, please do not use the reuplaod feature to upload the photo. A missing photo cannot be replaced that way. The only way to fix it is to upload the photo again, as priority, with a message to the screeners that it concerns a lost photo.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:50 am

Halos

If you received this rejection, it means halos were visible on yur photo. Usually this is a side effect of overediting. Halos are dark/light areas around a certain part in a photo. Halos also come in dark and light version. To check for halos, simply equalize the photo and any halo will immediately show.

The most common forms of halos we encounter are:
- dark halos around the tail or gears
- dark halos above the top of the fuselage
- light halos around the gears (usually when the aircraft is on the ground).

The below photo is an example of both halos being present in the same photo (ignore the wavey lines in the sky, that's 'banding'). The light halos are very visible around the wing and where it meets the fuselage. The tail is surrounded by a darker halo, as is the rest of the fuselage. As you can see, halos are very easy to spot when equalizing your image.

Image


Note for Nikon users: Be sure to turn off active D-lighting. It is a known cause of halos in photos.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:50 am

Heat Haze


Heat haze is caused by the difference in temperature between asphalt/concrete and the air above it. This phenomenon is most apparent on hot days but can also occur in winter. Long tele shots suffer from it the most. When you photograph aircraft on the ground, or even in the sky, heat haze will result in a blurred or wobbly appearance, e.g. lines on the aircraft become wobbly. Sharpening a heat hazed photo will lead to a very jaggy appearance. In general, photos affected by heat haze cannot be improved to Airliners.net standards.

Example:

Image
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:52 am

High Contrast


Your photo has a too high contrast setting. Too high contrast settings result in very strong differences between dark and light areas in the image, and usually in very strange-looking colors. The image looks very "hard".

The contrast problem may be due to incorrect post-processing with image editing software. If the image is a scan of a photo, negative or slide, it may be caused by incorrect scanner settings. In this case, please try different settings and rescan the image. This problem may also be the result of certain difficult lighting conditions. The best way to deal with this problem is to use image editing software to reduce the contrast.

Example:

Image
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:52 am

High in Frame


There is too much "empty space" below aircraft. Generally speaking the empty space on each side of the aircraft (both horizontally and vertically) should be equal.

You might also be getting this rejection for a shot where an aircraft is substantially pictured but a small amount of the wingtip, tail, or engine(s) is cut off. In this case you should re-crop the original photo to either include the whole aircraft or crop in tighter. For helicopters, please take the rotor into account as well.


Example:

Image


It can sometimes be difficult to correctly center an image. Usually the middle portion of the aircraft should occupy the centre portion of the frame. This does not hold up in all cases, especially for shorter aircraft with larger tails. The tail should not be ignored when centering - a good reminder would be that the 'centre of gravity' of the aircraft should be centered in the image, which might not necessarily be the window line. The usual suspects are aircraft with short fuselage/high tail combinations or airrcaft that have otherwise disproportionate fuselage/tail ratios. Some of the more notorious types are Boeing 737-5/6/700's, A318's and the A380. The screeners often check centering by looking at the thumbnail because you can look at the whole image in one glance. During the upload process we suggest you do the same when in doubt.

Example of high in frame (disproportional tail size):

Image

Note that when we say “take the tail into account”, this doesn’t necessarily mean leaving the same space on top and bottom. It just means that aircraft with disproportionate tails should be positioned lower. How much lower can be different for each photo.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:52 am

Info


Some of the information you submitted together with your photo(s) was missing, incorrect, irrelevant or in the wrong format. A common reason for this message is a missing registration or an airport name/location in the wrong format. In many cases this rejection can be avoided by using the autocomplete feature at the top of the upload page. Please use this! It is your responsibility to be sure that information submitted including the information given by the autocomplete is correct, if you are unsure about the information you can request assistance from the editors by sending an email to editors[at]airliners.net.

Next to each item on the upload page there is a Help link that offers very detailed information about that specific field. Please read this information carefully.

Some very common mistakes are:
- Putting a partial or incomplete date. For modern images, the date must include at least the year and month. You do not need to include the day, unless the image is from an airshow, display, or museum. In those cases, a full date must be given.
- Missing airline fields.
- Incorrectly listing the aircraft version.
- Filling in an airline for aircraft that do not carry any titles, or entering a title when the aircraft has none. 'Private' and 'Unknown' are not acceptable titles.
- Leaving the Registration field blank. If you do not know the registration. Use the generic form **-*** or a country-specific registration such as N***** or D-**** instead.
- Leaving the Registration field blank if the registration is visible in the photo.
- Filling in a Code that is not painted on the aircraft (i.e. no selcals, flight numbers, airline codes etc).
- You may also receive this message if some of the info you submitted was written in a non-English language or grossly misspelled, or to a significant incorrect use of upper and lower case letters (general rule: do not spell words or names in all capitals).

If this reason was the only one given in the rejection E-mail, please re-upload the photos and pay high attention to supplying the correct info. Always use the help link next to each item. If there were also other reasons mentioned in the rejection Email, please correct these issues first, before reuploading the photo with the correct information attached.


Notes:
- We do not correct remarks. In rare cases, we only remove sentences if they break the rules.
- The airline, type/version, country and location fields are not accessible to us, so we are unable to correct any such mistakes for you.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:53 am

Left in Frame


There is too much "empty space" on the right side of the aircraft. Generally speaking the empty space on each side of the aircraft (both horizontally and vertically) should be equal.

You might also be getting this rejection for a shot where an aircraft is substantially pictured but a small amount of the wingtip, tail, or engine(s) is cut off. In this case you should re-crop the original photo to either include the whole aircraft or crop in tighter.

It can sometimes be difficult to correctly center an image. Usually the middle portion of the aircraft should occupy the centre portion of the frame. This does not hold up in all cases, especially for shorter aircraft with larger tails. The tail should not be ignored when centering - a good reminder would be that the 'centre of gravity' of the aircraft should be centered in the image, which might not necessarily be the window line. As screeners we often check centering by looking at the thumbnail because you can look at the whole image in one glance. During the upload process we suggest you do the same when in doubt.

Example:

Image
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:53 am

Low contrast


Your photo has a too low contrast setting. Too low settings result in whites that are not pure white, or blacks that are not pure black. The image looks "flat".

The contrast problem may be due to incorrect post-processing with image editing software. If the image is a scan of a photo, negative or slide, it may be caused by incorrect scanner settings. In this case, please try different settings and rescan the image. This problem may also be the result of certain difficult lighting conditions. The best way to deal with this problem is to use image editing software to increase the contrast.

Example:

Image


Note: This is an extreme example. Usually photos with low contrast have a bit more than this. You can also see how contrast affects color.
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:53 am

Low in Frame


There is too much "empty space" above the aircraft. Generally speaking the empty space on each side of the aircraft (both horizontally and vertically) should be equal.

You might also be getting this rejection for a shot where an aircraft is substantially pictured but a small amount of the wingtip, tail, or engine(s) is cut off. In this case you should re-crop the original photo to either include the whole aircraft or crop in tighter.

It can sometimes be difficult to correctly center an image. Usually the middle portion of the aircraft should occupy the centre portion of the frame. This does not hold up in all cases, especially for shorter aircraft with larger tails. The tail should not be ignored when centering - a good reminder would be that the 'centre of gravity' of the aircraft should be centered in the image, which might not necessarily be the window line. For helicopters, please take the rotor into account as well. As screeners we often check centering by looking at the thumbnail because you can look at the whole image in one glance. During the upload process we suggest you do the same when in doubt.

Example:

Image
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:54 am

Motive


Your photo(s) showed a motive that is not accepted by Airliners.net. This problem may be due to a very wide range of reasons.

Some of the most common examples are:
- Photos showing just a part of an aircraft (with no motivation for doing so, like a special sticker, damage etc.). Additionally, cutting off the nose or a part of the tail can also result in a motive rejection.
- Photos with distracting or obstructing objects in the foreground (this is especially true for gate shots which are very difficult to get accepted due to their common nature and the large amount of equipment which usually surrounds the aircraft). Ramp vehicles (including tugs, loaders, baggage carts, etc...) are allowed to block part of the aircraft as long as they are: [1] not blocking engines or wheels (exception: tugs are allowed to block engines/wheels if towing aircraft, and ground crew are allowed to block any part if not too prominent, which is at our discretion) [2] below the window line [3] part of active operations (this amendment is meant to exclude any aircraft parked with equipment in front of it. 'Active operations' is meant to include those aircraft actively loading or unloading).
- Photos where the aircraft is covered (i.e. with a protective weather cover or for long-term storage). Shots with covers over a significant part of the aircraft will only be allowed if the aircraft is not on the db already. If we already have an image of it uncovered, then we will not accept it covered. This does not include engine/pitot covers. For partial/canopy covers, this again will be at our discretion.
- Photos that do not show an aircraft or anything sufficiently related to aviation at all. Common examples are photos of ramp equipment, like stairs, or cars. Or airport structures like radar towers, jet bridges, office buildings.
- Photos showing the date in the lower left or right corner of the image. If your photos show the date on them please disable this feature on your camera.
- Close up cockpit shots with the only reason for the shot being showing pilots waving.
- Cockpit photos in which the pilots block out most of the panel.
- Photos taken through aircraft windows that show little wing/engine and have no airport visible on the ground.
- Photos that include window reflections. These can result from taking photos through terminal windows or observations decks that are enclosed by glass. Shots taken through aircraft windows can also result in reflections, or can show scratches or dirt from those windows. This will also result in a motive rejection.
- Photos taken inside aircraft that only show tables, dinner trays, or personal tv's. Cabin overviews that are taken from a very low standpoint and have seatbacks block out most of the image.
- Photos where the terrain is blocking more than half of the gear, as the terrain is allowed to block no more than 50% of the wheel. Regarding runway/taxiway markers, minor blockages/obstructions are acceptable, provided that the obstruction is not too distracting from the overall of the image. For vegetation that is evenly spread out (i.e. not just one big clump of grass that could have been avoided, similar to a taxiway marker), there can be some tolerance past 50%, but this will be at our discretion.
- Please note our updated rules for museum type shots. Permanent obstructions (such as steps, fences, or signs) that could not have been avoided by composing the shot differently are acceptable. A tighter crop should also be a consideration to avoid major permanent obstructions. Minor obstructions such as chains or ropes should be positioned to not seriously detract from the image. Temporary obstructions (such as people, cars, or other moveable objects) will lead to a rejection. Cones are ok if unavoidable (i.e. by shooting from different angle) and not obstructing too much. How much is 'too much' will again be at our discretion.

Air-to-ground shots (i.e. taken from an aircraft of a subject on the ground) will be exempt from most obstruction rules due to the difficulty in obtaining them. Please note that motive rejections can also result from other, more subjective reasons. These are usually of an aesthetical nature.


Notes:
- Many closeup images are vulnerable to a motive rejection if we feel there is not enough reason for the closeup (damage or elaborate artwork can be a good reason for a closeup).
- Tail images need to show the entire outline of the tail. We do not accept close-ups of tail logos. We do accept images of tail but the entire tail needs to be visible.
- Images where the aircraft is obstructed by equipment, signs, buildings, vehicles etc are not accepted.
- Only airstairs (stairs that are part of the aircraft) are allowed to block certain parts of the aircraft.
- Fences are often a problem when photographing static displays at airshows. Try to work around them when shooting if possible. They will lead to a motive rejection on Airliners.net. For regular shooting situations, fences should not block any part of the aircraft. Fences taking up more than one-third of the frame can also be considered motive rejections even if not blocking part of the aircraft.
- When taking shots from the gate there's often a lot of equipment blocking the aircraft such as highloaders and especially jetways. This will result in a motive rejection.
- Jetways will in most cases lead to a motive rejection if blocking any part of the side of the aircraft facing the photographer. For head-on shots, they are not allowed to block the engine/gear or a significant portion of aircraft if a wider view. Small blockage of the wing will be allowed for tighter crops. As with other general types of obstructions, jetways are allowed to block the aircraft if the image is air-to-ground.
- We do not accept photos where the only motivation for the photo is waving pilots. We do accept pictures where the waving pilots are incidental to the image and not the main focus.
- Nose close-ups that show crew are acceptable when they are not waving.
- When shooting through glass often you'll end up with reflection in your picture causing a motive rejection.
- We are very strict on 'aircraft cut in half'.
- A motive rejection will be given if the horizontal stabilizer is clipped (unless the photo looks balanced).
- We accept engine close-ups but there has to be a good motivation for the shot. Engines not attached to aircraft are not accepted.
- Images that show the date on the picture are not allowed. Please turn this feature off in your camera.
- To have a window view accepted the image must either have 1) a significant portion of the aircraft visible 2) an airport visible on the ground 3) a combination of the above. Please make sure there is no windowframe visible in your photo.
- Images that do not show an airport or aircraft are not allowed.
- For photos of cabins we prefer a high angle so that the seats are visible from above. In the example below a low angle where only the seatbacks are visible will lead to a motive rejection. The same would apply had the photo been taken from the opposite side of the cabin.
- We allow people to be visible in photos and allow faces to be recognizable in photos. People can not be the main subject of the photo or the sole motivation. The people in the image must contribute to the overall aviation theme of your image, and not themselves be the sole content/motivation for the composition.
- We do not accept pictures where people pose in front of an aircraft.
- We allow flight crew to be recognisable,but we request that they are not looking into the camera. Cabin crew may be visible as well, as long as they are not the main motivation of the photo and are shown in a working setting. We need you to ask permission from the crew when you take the shot. This is very important!
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:54 am

Noise


There was too much grain or digital noise in your photo(s).

All slide or print scans contain a certain amount of grain, and all images from digital cameras contain a certain amount of digital noise, but these amounts should be kept at acceptable values. In case of a digital camera, avoiding noise rejections can be achieved by using a lower ISO speed, which will reduce the digital noise in the image. High ISO settings usually generate too much noise for the image to be acceptable.

Most image editing software have tools built-in for reducing noise. However, these will always have to be used with great care, because improper use will destroy much of the detail in the image, which may lead to an editing rejection. There are also separate programs available, that can be used standalone or as a plug-in for image editing software. These programs often give better results than the standard tools in the image editing software.

Please note that noise can also be caused or intensified by too much sharpening. Flat, uniform areas (such as the sky) are particularly prone to becoming noisy if too much sharpening is applied. We strongly recommend to deselect these areas before applying sharpening. Take care not to oversharpen your image. Noise can also be caused by brightening an (underexposed) image too much. Sharpening can also make images more noisy. When trying to improve a soft rejection by sharpening it more you need to be careful you do not sharpen to the point where the image gets noisy.

A large crop can also result in a noisy photo, that's why we always recommend that you frame the aircraft as best as possible in your original photo. The smaller the crop, the better the photo quality of what remains. In addition, when you have a dark photo and brighten it, noise will also show up more easily.

Example:

Image
 
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:55 am

Overexposed


Your photo is overexposed. In the case of a digital camera, the problem is almost certainly caused by incorrect exposure settings on your camera. In the case of a scanned image, it may be a problem with the original photo, negative or slide. Check your original photo, and if it appears to be correctly exposed then please change the settings on your scanner and rescan the image. Overexposure is often a problem when shooting light aircraft against dark background. Remember to underexpose accordingly.

You may try to use an image editing program to decrease the brightness or exposure of the images, but in most cases this will not lead to satisfactory results, and you will most likely be unable to improve the shot to an acceptable standard.

Example (overexposed image):

Image

Example (correctly exposed image):

Image


Notes:
- Sun glare on the aircraft may also result in a motive/overexposed rejection.
- Cockpits need to be properly exposed as well, i.e. no 'blown out' outside view. To achieve this, a external flash will help tremendously. Internal flashes may help, but usually don't produce enough light.
 
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airkas1
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:55 am

Oversharpened

Your photo(s) were sharpened too much.

In most cases this problem is due to oversharpening of the photo during post-processing in image editing software. Try sharpening the picture less aggressively to get rid of the jagged edges. These jagged edges are usually very visible on titles, cheatlines, registrations, or other straight lines. Selective use of masks to avoid excessive sharpening or areas where jagged lines may occur is a difficult but very effective method to avoid jagged edges. A good Airliners.net image should be sharpened to just before the point where the titles and edges of the aircraft start to turn jagged.

This rejection can also occur when an image is well sharpened overall but one or more parts of the image showed jagged lines. This problem is generally most evident on solid lines such as wing/horinzontal stabilizer leading edges, particularly if several lines are close together, such as gaps between the wing and flaps, cheatlines spaced closely together, or the aircraft titles and registration.

An often seen combination is blurry/oversharpened, which means that the original file is blurry and that the image has been oversharpened to compensate for the blurry/soft appearance. Sharpening a blurry photo will not improve it, it will only make it look worse.

A simple yet effective method to avoid "jaggies" is the use of layers in Photoshop:
1. Before you do any sharpening, create a new layer. Once done, apply sharpening.
2. If the image still looks soft, repeat step 1 until the general sharpening is OK (usually repeating it once is sufficient)
3. Use the "eraser tool" on those parts of the image where you see jaggies.
3. The jaggies should now be gone and you can "flatten" the image.


Example 1a: No sharpening -> soft rejection
Image
Larger version

Example 1b: Correctly sharpened -> accepted
Image
Larger version

Example 1c: slightly over-sharpened -> Over-sharpened rejection
Image
Larger version

Example 1d: heavily over-sharpened -> Over-sharpened rejection
Image
Larger version



Note: Sometimes you may get a rejection for soft and oversharpened at the same time. This means that one part of the image is soft while another is oversharpened. It may seem like a conflicting message but it relates to different parts of the image. In such cases, we try to leave you a personal message explaining the areas in question, but this may not always be possible.
 
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airkas1
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:55 am

People


You will usually get this rejection if there are people clearly recognisable ore too prominently present in your photo(s). Cockpit photos with the pilots in their seats are acceptable, provided that they are not looking at the camera. Any photo in which people are prominently posing is not allowed. This means obvious foreground posing (whether for your camera or someone else). 'General beach overview' photos of e.g. SXM that include people are OK. A couple of examples below:

1. Wide view of the beach. Lots of people. The third photo is a closer view of the beach. Still many people, but they are clearly not the subject of the photo. Acceptable.



2. Fewer people, but none of them posing in the direction of the photographer. Acceptable.



3. Few people. Almost or as many prominence as the aircraft. Borderline.



4. Very few people. Clearly posing either for the photographer or for someone in the same direction, OR people have more prominense than the aircraft. Not acceptable anymore.

 
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airkas1
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:56 am

Personal Message


Personal means that the screener left you a personal note. You can find the message in your rejection E-mail. The message contains additional information on what is wrong with the photo and/or where on the photo you can find the flaw. It may also include recommendations from time to time.

If you do not receive your rejection E-mails please contact support[at]airliners.net. If you cannot view the personal message and want to know, please E-mail screeners[at]airliners.net
 
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airkas1
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:56 am

Photog


To upload photos you do not own the copyrights to, is a violation of international copyright laws and may result in huge fines or even a prison sentence, depending on severity and country. Something about your photo(s) or the attached information led us to believe that you may not be the actual photographer of this photo. You must have photographed the photos yourself or hold the copyright in another way to add them to Airliners.net. This is very important due to the copyright issues involved.

If you want to upload a small amount of photos taken by friends or relatives who are not interested in having an Airliners.net account, you can upload them under your account provided that you have the written permission to do so. In such cases, indicate clearly in the “Remark field” the photo owner name. For a large collection of photos, E-mail us at headscreeners[at]airliners.net and we'll let you know what to do.
 
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airkas1
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:56 am

Quality


The image quality of your photo(s) did not meet the very high standards of Airliners.net.

This may be the result of several perceived problems happening simultaneously, such as noise, blurriness, or unfavorable lighting. Usually we use this rejection reason to indicate that we suspect that the original image quality is not sufficient to make a good edit from it.

We will also use this rejection reason when we feel there are a number of different flaws in the image which have the effect of reducing the overall quality of the image. This might include a number of factors, which in themselves may not be enough to warrant a rejection (e.g. slight oversharpening, contrast issues, etc.), but when seen together amount to a quality rejection. Other times this reason may be given when we cannot pinpoint the exact problem with your image. This can happen when your image is taken with a low quality digital camera or when your image was heavily cropped.

If you are using a digital camera, check the camera settings and use the highest quality setting and resolution the camera has to offer. Please be aware also that unprocessed digital camera output is generally not of acceptable quality for Airliners.net. Most shots from a digital camera do require a certain amount of post-processing with image editing software, mainly levelling, sharpening and resizing. If you are using a lower quality digital camera you may want to consider investing in a camera with higher resolution or borrow one from your friend/workplace/school.

If the image was a scanned photo, negative or slide, the most common cause for this problem is either a bad scanner or that the scanner wasn't used properly. If you think this might be the cause, please read the documentation for your scanner and find the best DPI and color settings. Generally a higher DPI and color setting will make a higher quality image, but only to a certain degree. Try many different settings until you find the best combination. If you are using an old or low quality scanner, you might consider investing in a new or borrow one from your friend/workplace/school.

Sometimes it may help to reduce the size of the photo. A smaller size will mask more flaws. However in todays world, if you have a (semi-)proffesional camera, enlarging the image to a bit bigger size might also help. Whcih way you should resize cannot be determined without an actual photo though, so you will likely have to learn through trial and error. The Feedback forum is a good tool in such cases, there you can post your photos so your peers and screeners can give you feedback on them before they get screened.

Because of our very high quality standards, a high quality camera is required in order to get photos accepted on Airliners.net. A low quality point-and-shoot camera or mobile phone camera will generally result in a low quality images. Although nowadays, even some mobile phone cameras will get an acceptable results in the right conditions. We also need to mention here that slidescans or printscans are generally not of high enough quality to be accepted here. The exception in this case are old images (pre digital era), which as explained in the general notes section are subject to much lower standards. However, when submitting slidescans or printscans of current subjects they will in most cases not be of sufficient quality.
 
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airkas1
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:57 am

Reupload


Your photo(s) seems to be an unchanged reupload of a photo that was previously rejected.

Re-uploading previously rejected photos in unchanged form is not allowed. Instead, use the appeal link which is included in your rejection E-mail (scroll further down in your email to see this link) to move this rejected picture into the queue of the head screeners, who will have the final decision about acceptance or rejection of this picture. If the picture was already appealed by you and rejected by the head screeners or the administrator, please be so kind and do not reupload it again without improving it.

Please note that continuous reuploading may result in a temporary ban from the site.
 
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airkas1
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Re: Airliners.net Photo Upload & Acceptance Guide

Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:57 am

Right in Frame


There is too much "empty space" on the left side of the aircraft. Generally speaking the empty space on each side of the aircraft (both horizontally and vertically) should be equal.

You might also be getting this rejection for a shot where an aircraft is substantially pictured but a small amount of the wingtip, tail, or engine(s) is cut off. In this case you should re-crop the original photo to either include the whole aircraft or crop in tighter.

It can sometimes be difficult to correctly center an image. Usually the middle portion of the aircraft should occupy the centre portion of the frame. This does not hold up in all cases, especially for shorter aircraft with larger tails. The tail should not be ignored when centering - a good reminder would be that the 'centre of gravity' of the aircraft should be centered in the image, which might not necessarily be the window line. As screeners we often check centering by looking at the thumbnail because you can look at the whole image in one glance. During the upload process we suggest you do the same when in doubt.

Example:

Image

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