DanielK
Topic Author
Posts: 83
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2016 7:33 am

High ISO Night Panning Editing

Tue Sep 24, 2019 11:58 pm

Hi Airliners.net community,
Recently I have gone out at night to get some night action panning shots. I would love if photographers who are experienced in this area can give me some general tips and a workflow to how to get these shots up to Airliners.net standard.


Thanks,
Daniel
 
vikkyvik
Posts: 12509
Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2003 1:58 pm

Re: High ISO Night Panning Editing

Wed Sep 25, 2019 2:37 pm

Hopefully you shot RAW.

Depending on how high the ISO is, I have various presets for RAW noise reduction. At ISOs up around 6400 and higher, this can be pretty significant.

Some pretty good advice in this thread. I posted some of my presets in Reply 12:

viewtopic.php?f=8&t=934497

Ultimately, it's going to take some practice in the editing.
I'm watching Jeopardy. The category is worst Madonna songs. "This one from 1987 is terrible".
 
cpd
Posts: 6026
Joined: Sat Jun 28, 2008 4:46 am

Re: High ISO Night Panning Editing

Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:34 pm

It’s less about workflow and more about technique with the camera and having a good camera and lens combination. :old:

Lenses like the Nikon 70-200mm F/2.8 with an excellent VR system really help with the panning at very slow shutter speeds, while the F2.8 aperture lets you get away with a lower ISO (say 1600).

It’s the lower ISO and resulting less noisy image that helps a lot. Getting the exposure right is also important, and I always set the shutter, aperture and ISO manually. All of that makes editing easier and less about very special noise reduction techniques.

Rest is just steady hands and practice.

I first started doing this stuff when I got hold of a D3S Nikon all those years ago, but I remember Florian Trojer was doing these kinds of shots even long before that. (Some of you youngsters won’t know who he is). I would love to try it again with these modern cameras that are even more capable.
 
DanielK
Topic Author
Posts: 83
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2016 7:33 am

Re: High ISO Night Panning Editing

Sun Sep 29, 2019 11:50 pm

cpd wrote:
It’s less about workflow and more about technique with the camera and having a good camera and lens combination. :old:

Lenses like the Nikon 70-200mm F/2.8 with an excellent VR system really help with the panning at very slow shutter speeds, while the F2.8 aperture lets you get away with a lower ISO (say 1600).

It’s the lower ISO and resulting less noisy image that helps a lot. Getting the exposure right is also important, and I always set the shutter, aperture and ISO manually. All of that makes editing easier and less about very special noise reduction techniques.

Rest is just steady hands and practice.

I first started doing this stuff when I got hold of a D3S Nikon all those years ago, but I remember Florian Trojer was doing these kinds of shots even long before that. (Some of you youngsters won’t know who he is). I would love to try it again with these modern cameras that are even more capable.


I shot this image with my Nikon D7200 which is paired with the Sigma 70-200 f2.8 . The combo is very good and managed to snap this last Saturday night. https://imgur.com/TqCXKsz . Some areas are sharp while others aren’t, I’d love to get it on the database here.
 
vikkyvik
Posts: 12509
Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2003 1:58 pm

Re: High ISO Night Panning Editing

Mon Sep 30, 2019 1:56 pm

DanielK wrote:
I shot this image with my Nikon D7200 which is paired with the Sigma 70-200 f2.8 . The combo is very good and managed to snap this last Saturday night. https://imgur.com/TqCXKsz . Some areas are sharp while others aren’t, I’d love to get it on the database here.


Probably not going to happen - the tail area is pretty blurry. That can easily happen at low shutter speeds - one end of the aircraft can be tack sharp, and the other end is a blurry mess.

Have to find a balance - get the middle of the fuse to be sharp, and the ends probably won't be too blurry (there will almost always be some blur at low shutter speeds, it just depends on how noticeable it is). I take a lot of shots of any given aircraft - most of them will be throwaways, but there may be a couple good ones in there.

cpd wrote:
It’s less about workflow and more about technique with the camera and having a good camera and lens combination.


It can be. But some people aren't going to be able to shoot at 1/4 or 1/8 second and get good results - my hands generally aren't steady enough for that. And my wallet isn't steady enough for good F2.8 telephoto lenses. So I'm left shooting at high ISOs. And with those shots, editing is quite important if you're interested in getting shots on A.net.
I'm watching Jeopardy. The category is worst Madonna songs. "This one from 1987 is terrible".
 
cpd
Posts: 6026
Joined: Sat Jun 28, 2008 4:46 am

Re: High ISO Night Panning Editing

Wed Oct 02, 2019 7:45 pm

DanielK wrote:
cpd wrote:
It’s less about workflow and more about technique with the camera and having a good camera and lens combination. :old:

Lenses like the Nikon 70-200mm F/2.8 with an excellent VR system really help with the panning at very slow shutter speeds, while the F2.8 aperture lets you get away with a lower ISO (say 1600).

It’s the lower ISO and resulting less noisy image that helps a lot. Getting the exposure right is also important, and I always set the shutter, aperture and ISO manually. All of that makes editing easier and less about very special noise reduction techniques.

Rest is just steady hands and practice.

I first started doing this stuff when I got hold of a D3S Nikon all those years ago, but I remember Florian Trojer was doing these kinds of shots even long before that. (Some of you youngsters won’t know who he is). I would love to try it again with these modern cameras that are even more capable.


I shot this image with my Nikon D7200 which is paired with the Sigma 70-200 f2.8 . The combo is very good and managed to snap this last Saturday night. https://imgur.com/TqCXKsz . Some areas are sharp while others aren’t, I’d love to get it on the database here.


That light is good, the plane is very clear, but the angle is tricky with slow shutter speeds and big aperture settings, resulting in areas that are sharp and others that aren’t. Directly side on shots are easier. You will get shots where bits are blurry, that’s how it is, especially if using 1/4 or 1/2sec shutter speeds.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 28 guests

Popular Searches On Airliners.net

Top Photos of Last:   24 Hours  •  48 Hours  •  7 Days  •  30 Days  •  180 Days  •  365 Days  •  All Time

Military Aircraft Every type from fighters to helicopters from air forces around the globe

Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos