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Bao
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Question about sharpening

Fri Mar 06, 2020 6:57 pm

Well, this has been a question for long in my mind after quite a few photos rejected for the reason soft. Is there a way (better quantitatively) to see if the photo is properly shapened? Or is it merely based on experience and kind of underlying "feeling"? Thanks!
 
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clickhappy
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Re: Question about sharpening

Fri Mar 06, 2020 8:28 pm

Honestly, it is both, IMO. It is important to establish a base-line, that way you have something to work with and can sharpen more, or less, based on a particular shot.

What program are you using to edit your photos?
 
cpd
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Re: Question about sharpening

Sun Mar 08, 2020 7:07 pm

Bao wrote:
Well, this has been a question for long in my mind after quite a few photos rejected for the reason soft. Is there a way (better quantitatively) to see if the photo is properly shapened? Or is it merely based on experience and kind of underlying "feeling"? Thanks!


It’s definitely sharpening related? I remember that soft can also be to do with lighting or contrast. It’s been eight or nine years since I’ve done this.

My way was to sharpen (using smart-filter) to the point of those jagged edges appearing, then use a layer mask in photoshop to mask them out gradually until it looks sharp but not overdone.

I also made sure my edits were non destructive (and saved a PSD file of the work), so if the screener reckoned something needed tweaking I could do that fix without needing to redo the entire image.

This is all in Photoshop.

I had a few settings I’d use as a starting point in relation to sharpening. Other things like colour temperature I just applied as a blanket setting to all photos done at a particular time and location, unless the light changed totally (it became cloudy for instance).
 
Silver1SWA
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Re: Question about sharpening

Sun Mar 08, 2020 8:25 pm

Bao wrote:
Well, this has been a question for long in my mind after quite a few photos rejected for the reason soft. Is there a way (better quantitatively) to see if the photo is properly shapened? Or is it merely based on experience and kind of underlying "feeling"? Thanks!


There are so many variables. What monitor you are using, which screener is looking at your photo, what monitor is that screener using, etc.

It’s been a while but back when I was uploading regularly I had to gauge the rejection tendencies and adjust accordingly. For example I had a monitor that would look crisp and sharp. What looked properly sharpened on my display would get soft rejections so I had to intentionally oversharpen to get it looking right for the screeners.
ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
 
ReneWendt
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Re: Question about sharpening

Mon Mar 09, 2020 7:16 pm

I convert the image to a smart-object and use a smart-filter (high pass) for sharpening. As CPD wrote, save it as a PSD file - it is so easy to correct a rejected image that way.
I have the same issue as Silver mentioned: My monitor show the image crisp and sharp, but sometimes it is seen as soft. Just have to get the feel for the right look then.
 
cpd
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Re: Question about sharpening

Tue Mar 10, 2020 9:59 am

ReneWendt wrote:
I convert the image to a smart-object and use a smart-filter (high pass) for sharpening. As CPD wrote, save it as a PSD file - it is so easy to correct a rejected image that way.
I have the same issue as Silver mentioned: My monitor show the image crisp and sharp, but sometimes it is seen as soft. Just have to get the feel for the right look then.


Bingo. Also for things like colour adjustments, that's also easy. If you've used a RAW image to start with, then you open it as a smart object and then it is super easy to double click the layer, that opens the RAW image in Camera Raw editor again. Also good for things like missed dust spots. You can quickly fix those without having to redo your entire edit from scratch.

I ended up having my own site for a time and it then I simply just ended up doing similar workflows to how I would process images I was doing for work, minimum edits needed, maximum speed.

Fine and fussy editing isn't appealing any more.

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