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evedwards1990
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Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 5:50 am

I know that a lot of you get your photos rejected, no matter how well you did. We all get rejected from time to time. Yes, airliners only racks up the top notch of quality, and weeds out the poor stuff. Only the best of the best get shown. And I understand that clearly and do my best whenever I get the chance. And I assume you also do your best too  

So, how do you guys cope with it?

Yeah, I'm having trouble because I don't get the chance to be around airplanes that much For me, getting the chance to be around airplane is like, less than once a year....

(please don't reply angry stuff too, no matter how fustrated you are...)
 
dl767captain
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 6:17 am

Basically just keep trying and practicing. Eventually you'll get one accepted. That's what I did. It took some time to learn the techniques that make a good picture and the right editing techniques to get the picture perfect
 
evedwards1990
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 6:37 am

Quote:
Basically just keep trying and practicing. Eventually you'll get one accepted. That's what I did. It took some time to learn the techniques that make a good picture and the right editing techniques to get the picture perfect

But I don't get the chance that often. I only get to travel like, in interval patterns, 2-3 years. So, it's like waiting for all the planets in our solar system to line up in a straight line... that rare...

But I love gliders more than anything else there is! I visited a gliding club, but they're fully booked and I can't fly. so I took pictures, good ones, and....
 
Psych
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 7:03 am

Hello Evan.

To be honest I don't cope that brilliantly, even after 6 years here and nearly 2000 accepted photos. You edit your photo, believe that you have achieved the correct standard, and then someone (often who you don't know, but invested with 'power' that you don't have through their screener status) says 'no'. It is a recipe for feeling less than great. One good strategy is to try to remember that they often know what they are talking about   .

I remember back 6 years ago when I was trying to get my first photo accepted, and failing. For me the trick is - firstly and obviously - having the right subject matter. It sounds like you don't get many opportunities. But that aside, assuming you know the basics of photography and have half decent equipment, then you can definitely get an acceptance. As was discussed in a recent thread, I think you will need to know how to edit a digital photograph as well. But don't feel bad about asking for advice and help - it is definitely out there.

If you have photos of gliders then that sounds good, because the subjects are unlikely to be common. More opportunities there then for an acceptance. I would be very happy to help.

Don't underestimate the fundamental importance of knowing how to take a decent photo - irrespective of the subject matter. Using things like aperture changes, shutter speeds, depth of field, composition and, most importantly of all, the effect of light. You don't need planes to practice that - anything will do.

Cheers.

Paul
 
javibi
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 7:46 am

Quoting Evedwards1990 (Thread starter):
airliners only racks up the top notch of quality, and weeds out the poor stuff.

That is not really true; a lot of the rejected photos are nothing but poor. Many of the IMO best aviation shots out there would be (or maybe have been) rejected here.

I had my first acceptance in 2000 but I have to admit that I still can't help but to feel a bit disappointed when I get a rejection (which is the majority of times I upload).

To cope with all this it is good to have alternative places to display your work, e.g, Flickr, the competition, etc...  

Good luck!

j

[Edited 2010-11-02 01:04:47]
 
cpd
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 8:06 am

I do get annoyed with rejections, but I'm more annoyed when it is for something silly that I should have noticed.

Javier is right, you need other places to show your photos too. Even though a.net might not like your photos, some people still do.  

Everyone needs a bit of positive comments now and then. I recently got photographers choice for one of my images. It was only the second time I've had that (thanks to those who voted), and getting top of the 24 hours was equally nice. That makes up for the rejections.  

However, what I also crave is photographing different things - but that's not so easy considering my job doesn't take me jet-setting around the world - and given that I'm a world away from everywhere else, it's not exactly cheap. That said, I might just become a nocturnal photographer now. That's a challenge.  Smile

[Edited 2010-11-02 01:15:46]
 
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NZ107
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 9:37 am

Quoting cpd (Reply 5):
It was only the second time I've had that

Correct me if I'm wrong - but you don't know unless you check yourself, just like making the top of 24 hrs? But yeah it must feel better to think that fellow photographers actually liked your image and clicked to vote rather than 10,000+ views on a boring EK A380 Economy cabin in one day  
 
cpd
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 9:40 am

Quoting NZ107 (Reply 6):

Correct me if I'm wrong - but you don't know unless you check yourself

I got an email on both occasions actually. It's a nice thing to get.

[Edited 2010-11-02 02:40:42]
 
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NZ107
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 9:49 am

Quoting cpd (Reply 7):
I got an email on both occasions actually. It's a nice thing to get.

Yeah, I bet.. That's a nice touch. It'd feel good if they sent out emails for top of 24 hours too.. I guess I'll need to find a more creative spot somewhere and start taking photos. I have no doubts that your night shots are going create some interest.. Well they'd better even get up first or this site had better change for the times.

Anyway back on the original topic.. I was also in that situation waiting for my first upload.. It was my brother (who isn't an aviation enthusiast by any means) who beat me to it, 4 years before I was able to get a picture up myself! That really got to me. But it takes time and practice. But the goal shouldn't be 100% on uploading pictures to this site because it limits the imagination somewhat. Starting up a flickr account or something like that might be a good start.
 
qfflyer
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 10:07 am

Quoting NZ107 (Reply 8):
It'd feel good if they sent out emails for top of 24 hours too

Agreed, I found one day only via sheer luck, that one of my [few] shots was top of 24 hours, I didn't even get an e-mail saying this photo had been accepted!
 
spencer
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:33 am

I won't lie, it's a bit of a sting when that rejection mail comes through. But to be fair, honestly, half of the time it's my own stupidity that leads to a rejection. Having said that some of the time I'll sit there wondering how can mine get rejected when there's worse already on the site! But it is what it is. I now take medication to get me by!  
Spence.
 
evedwards1990
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:40 am

Quoting NZ107 (Reply 8):
Starting up a flickr account or something like that might be a good start.

You mean, I should ease it off from airliners.net for a while and use flickr?
 
cpd
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:50 am

Quoting Evedwards1990 (Reply 11):

You mean, I should ease it off from airliners.net for a while and use flickr?

Do both, if you wish. It's just another avenue for you to share photos in somewhere other than the highly competitive world of this site.
 
viv
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 2:02 pm

Quoting Evedwards1990 (Thread starter):
So, how do you guys cope with it?

Simple. I know that Anet is not that important. So they reject my shots? Why should I care if I like them?

Shoot for your own satisfaction, not for Anet. If they accept some of your shots, it's a bonus. If they reject some of your shots, it's not the end of the world.
 
virgin777
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 2:58 pm

Quoting viv (Reply 13):

Spot on Viv !

Yeah it is a little frustrating when you get a rejection but ... you'll live ... its not the end of the world.

Even if you don't agree with the rejection the picture itself maybe the best you've taken but simply doesn't fit the "criteria" of the site , the fact that you like it is all the matters , never shoot just for Airliners.net shoot for you !

regards



[Edited 2010-11-02 08:01:16]
 
evedwards1990
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 3:35 pm

Quoting virgin777 (Reply 14):

But I rarely get to be around airplanes! 

Am I supposed to wait for the next 2-3 years or something?
 
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TupolevTu154
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 3:47 pm

Why not visit the gliding club more often and practice your photography there? You live in BKK? Well there's at least two big international airports there that you must be able to get to? Even someone who has absolutely no interest in aviation in the slightest goes somewhere near an airport at some point in 2-3 years surely.
 
snecma
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 4:52 pm

Hi. I get lots of rejections. My day feels incomplete without one or two per day. lol.

Seriously now. I have a lot of photos accepted after correcting what the screeners told me was wrong. I just wish they would create a criteria called "motive", as I think a lot of my photos rejected for that reason looks very good.

Regards

Jacobus
 
Numero4
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 5:43 pm

Honestly, I don't ever feel frustrated. I am grateful for every shot they accepted, and there's even a few shots that I am surprised up to this day that made it through.

I think it's mostly because I am still on the beginner's high, and I view the screeners as people who know a lot more than I do about photography and I view rejections as an opportunity to learn what is good and what is not. I am glad they don't accept all the photographs that are submitted (that's why there's myaviation.net) because then getting your photos accepted wouldn't be exciting.

The only thing that gets to me a little is whenever I get a rejection, there's often no indication of how close the shot came to being accepted. Unless you get the "Quality" rejection (which, put clearly, a clear way to tell you the original photograph is not a.net material), it's still hard for me to tell whether or not I should re-edit the photo and try to submit it again.

Also, whenever I get the "Contrast" rejection, I have a hard time figuring if it's because contrast is too flat or too harsh.
 
megatop412
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 6:05 pm

My coping plan is simple- after many attempts, I stopped trying to upload. I only come to the forums anymore to learn more about operations and the different camera discussions and such.

I realized that "beauty is in the eye of the beholder" a while back- seeing a row of consecutive uploads from the same photographer of airliners against an overly-saturated sky, with poor contrast and visible softness, from the exact same angle, of very common aircraft, for example. I've also emailed such observations to screeners, only to have those concerns explained away that what I'm seeing is "jetwash", not distortion. I've been doing this for over 10 years and I know jetwash when I see it. I view photos on a Viewsonic LCD calibrated monitor and shoot Nikon/Nikkor equipment, so that takes care of that.

It can't be argued that all photos are judged based solely on their IQ, because that simply isn't the case. I also know that if you've already had shots accepted, you have a greater chance of having future shots accepted, and they are not as heavily scrutinized, which is how the above situation happens. This is why you can only update 2 shots at a time if you have no accepted shots, and this limit increases as your # of acceptances increases. Further, pointing these trends out tends to lead to 'tsk, tsk' and finger-wagging as though one has poor form.

The other thing is that the database is now loaded with shots that most anyone can get, such as your typical landing/approach shots, and that it is clearly an advantage for those people who have access priveleges such as rampers, pilots, ATC, and security, or for those who know these folks. Photographers have also become more creative(a good thing) with things like renting aircraft to do air-to-air shooting, but that is out of the question for most people in this economy.

My suggestion is to do what I have done: get yourself a little photo-sharing site as someone previously suggested, I use both dropshots and Flickr, and start puttin' em up. Go to the airports to have fun, and forget about who says your shots are acceptable. Since doing that, I have been able to stop drinking! Just kidding. Who knows? Maybe once you stop trying to impress the screeners, they'll actually start to like your work.

I know some would say I am bitter and frustrated. Eh. That's fine by me. I still come back for the shared interest in aviation, but never for 'acceptance'. We all know the real juice kicks in when we're right there to see the A380 on final approach or the classic DC-8 departing full throttle.
 
NIKV69
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 6:44 pm

I send the screeners a nasty email with a lot of F bombs.

Feels so good.
 
dendrobatid
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 7:01 pm

Quoting Numero4 (Reply 18):
Also, whenever I get the "Contrast" rejection, I have a hard time figuring if it's because contrast is too flat or too harsh.

Numero4

I take your point here as contrast rejections can sometimes be difficult to determine. Low contrast is by far the commonest rejection, where blacks are weak, dark grey rather than a good, deep black

I have asked that all screeners include a personal with contrast rejections, though these are likely to be limited to High or low.
I hope this helps

Mick Bajcar
 
Jez
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 8:48 pm

Coping? I don't really understand the question.........maybe it's because.......I'm a man! Get some nuts!!!
 
JakTrax
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 8:49 pm

Some greats statements made in this thread!

A.net is a good 'consumer' source for aviation images of all types but I agree that there are many thousands of images hosted elsewhere that are outstanding but just fell foul of the criteria set here.

In my eyes a soft/bad colour/bad contrast/unlevel/whatever else shot isn't necessarily a poor shot. In some extreme instances, neither are blurry images; although I'm sure most blur the screeners see here is not intentional and by no means creative!

I tried to use the newer relaxed rules to my advantage a couple of times recently (with the same shot) but to no avail. I imagine it would have made a 'top of the day' as it was a very interesting image, but a tiny signpost (which didn't cover any part of the aircraft) was seen as killing the motive. In my opinion a great and attractive shot but not everyone would agree.

I think new folks can be put off by the standards here but - as I've always said - if I can do it, you can bet anyone can! Most here aren't pro's but with the advent of digital you'd have a difference distinguishing the work of a pro from anyone else's.

One thing I have noticed (especially with the younger folks) is that some kind of try and run before they can walk. They fail to look closely at the standard of accepted work, take a shot they THINK looks like something they've seen in the database (it's rarely similar!) then kick off when it's rejected. That, "How dare you reject my shot!" attitude. Often these people calm down and eventually succeed but some refuse to listen to sound advice or, if they do, never implement it. The whole, "I know better" thing.

On a final note, by some miracle my first, second and third shots ever submitted here were all accepted; albeit I had a little assistance with the first one. It's just now - nearly four years down the line - that I'm beginning to struggle with the rejections, LOL!!! With just short of 1,000 images here, I'd say that deals a blow to the 'more you have, the less they scrutinise' theory...

Karl
 
cargolex
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 9:04 pm

I guess I don't understand the issue of 2-3 years that the OP is talking about. If you live in Bangkok...there's two huge airports there. If you can afford a camera capable of taking decent A.net quality photos, surely you can catch a bus to the airport. That's the thing about airports, they make them pretty easy to get to. Just because you're not in the terminal doesn't mean you can't take photos of airplanes. The vast majority of photos you see on A.net are not taken from the terminal.

As far as dealing with rejections, at first I found it frustrating - but each rejection makes your eye better for next time, and also tends to weed out bad habits in your shooting and editing processes. This is not only useful for A.net, it's useful for all your photography. Airplanes aren't the only thing I photograph and I use my camera mainly for work. I had become very lazy with my process before starting to upload to A.net, and thanks to all those rejections I think my other work is better than ever.

You should also look at it like Viv says, you should do it because you're having fun. If A.net accepts your shots that's great, but if you're only doing it to get on A.net that's probably not the the right reason. I was at BFI not long ago and met an A.net DB editor. I got zero A.net-worthy shots from that day - but I had fun being there.
 
dlowwa
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:00 pm

Quoting megatop412 (Reply 19):
It can't be argued that all photos are judged based solely on their IQ, because that simply isn't the case. I also know that if you've already had shots accepted, you have a greater chance of having future shots accepted, and they are not as heavily scrutinized, which is how the above situation happens.

Sorry to ruin your fantasy, but that's blatantly false - every shot is scrutinized in the same manner. We screen the images, not the names attached to the images.

Quoting JakTrax (Reply 23):
I tried to use the newer relaxed rules to my advantage a couple of times recently (with the same shot) but to no avail. I imagine it would have made a 'top of the day' as it was a very interesting image, but a tiny signpost (which didn't cover any part of the aircraft) was seen as killing the motive.

Which image are you referring to Karl? I see no such photo in the log.

Quoting CargoLex (Reply 24):
I guess I don't understand the issue of 2-3 years that the OP is talking about. If you live in Bangkok...there's two huge airports there. If you can afford a camera capable of taking decent A.net quality photos, surely you can catch a bus to the airport. That's the thing about airports, they make them pretty easy to get to. Just because you're not in the terminal doesn't mean you can't take photos of airplanes. The vast majority of photos you see on A.net are not taken from the terminal.

     
 
emmerson
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:10 pm

I’m often a bit miffed by the frequently expressed view of “shoot photos for yourself not A.net”. I hear this standpoint aired many times publicly and have often asked myself the question, would I do anything differently if I did ?. To me the answer is no. I would track the aviation based subject and related background/foreground (if desired) the same through the viewfinder, regardless of this photo database.

At the end of the day, some images may be A.net material, others not. Do the ‘others’ mean they should be on A.net ?. To take a literary analogy, there are some brilliant authors writing books but not every publisher wishes for each work to reach print.

I take aviation pictures because the subject is important and therefore the subject must feature prominently, be captured and presented to the best of one‘s ability even with budget kit…..would I deliberately want to take and submit blurry/unsharp/poor contrast/off centered/wonky/poorly processed images even if they were artistic or of special interest ?…..ugh no. That (for me) would not be remotely satisfying. If the pictures I take are any of the aforementioned rejection criteria then they are inherently poor quality regardless if they sit on ‘photo-storage.com‘ or destined for the A.net queue.

So what’s left ? I guess it’s the Motive, Double and Grainy rejection criteria that have and will likely ‘irk’ me the most, as they are often considered to be the most subjective between individuals …but hey, I’m invited to Upload and I click Accept after a narrative.

I Appeal a few but am now learning not to be trigger happy with this feature as usually after 3 deep breaths and sitting back, a couple of Screeners usually have a valid point...and for that I thank them for their time.

[Edited 2010-11-02 16:15:57]
 
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NZ107
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:47 pm

Quoting emmerson (Reply 26):

Life's not just about getting pictures up onto A.Net. Sure enough, the criteria required by A.Net means that one has to strive for the things that they want but it's not saying that pictures that aren't accepted aren't bad. A.Net provides a very steep learning curve to most (I admit, I have learnt a lot and will continue to learn from other photographers here) and the basics of photography can be nailed by following the steps.. That is, getting the subject in the middle of the frame, right exposure, contrast, colour, noise, level, right amounts of sharpness etc. All of these are important (and useful) for general photo taking too. But for creativity purposes, you have to step outside of the square. The square that I'm referring to here is the A.Net bunch of accepted photos. Creativity is what can make certain shots special. And if one was wanting to publicise their work, there's no better place to do that than say a site like Flickr or even myaviation.net. Post them to 'groups' on flickr- people will come and look at your images and even comment if they like them. It takes practice.. Rest assured, keep coming back to the feedback forum and ask for advice but why let that stop you from publicising pictures that you like and want to share with people due to one small thing? Motivation is a key word in this as well. If you are willing to learn what it takes to get pictures up here, you'll learn. But the process may take some time and while you're at it, there's no harm in submitting some pictures to Flickr etc.

I don't let the window motive issue bug me even though I think that there isn't any motive issue.. The shot would be quite boring if the entire frame wasn't included and there was a tiny bit of wing sticking out. I just put them on Flickr so that people can enjoy them.

So I conclude with: Why limit yourself to the confines of the Airliners.Net policies when photography itself is more than just about getting pictures accepted?
 
JakTrax
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 12:18 am

Quoting dlowwa (Reply 25):
Which image are you referring to Karl? I see no such photo in the log



Was over 12 months ago now. BA 747 crossing the old 'through' road at the LHR maintenance area, with a huge queue of traffic waiting at the flashing gates.

Quoting emmerson (Reply 26):
would I deliberately want to take and submit blurry/unsharp/poor contrast/off centered/wonky/poorly processed images even if they were artistic or of special interest ?…..ugh no



So you're saying your images are perfect straight from the camera? And that you've never had a rejection? Because if you'd never knowingly submit images with these faults surely you must've never suffered a rejection?

I can't quite agree. Images don't have to be level, super-sharp, centred, etc. to be fantastic - both aesthetically and technically. If you yourself are working to this criteria then you are surely shooting purely for A.net? I have deliberately taken shots featuring all the faults you mention (including what I consider creative blur), but very few have ever made it here. A.net doesn't want them for justifiable reasons and I don't particularly want to upload them.

Sure, there are times when I do shoot for A.net (I am a big fan of 'side-ons-in-sun') but at the same time I'm shooting with my own criteria in mind - which just so happens to be similar to A.net's. I like keeping records of the full aircraft and its entire livery, which again happens to be pretty much what works best here.

There are images I know straight away which won't work here for various reasons (quality included sometimes), but on the flip side there are images I personally have online that I wouldn't want seen in my own personal collection because I've over-processed them to an unacceptable degree. Swings and roundabouts. No-one makes you submit your work here, so you have to learn to take it or leave it. In A.net's defence, I don't think a rejection is always necessarily someone telling you that your image isn't good enough. I bet the screeners often see images they'd like to see online but the demands of the site and their peers limit how much they can do do make it happen.

Things will inevitably keep changing; embracing and accommodating more and more creative images as A.net slowly distances itself from the old hobbyist-only site it once was.

Getting images on here is difficult, time-consuming and often frustrating but patience is rewarded. And even if you never succeed, is it really the end of the world? I'm sure everyone can succeed with the right determination.

Karl
 
emmerson
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 12:55 am

Quoting JakTrax (Reply 28):
So you're saying your images are perfect straight from the camera?

No (they always require PP).

Quoting JakTrax (Reply 28):
And that you've never had a rejection?

No (I've had plenty).

My commentary was based on the topic matter, Rejections and that sometimes we learn via them that photos are indeed inherently "blurry/unsharp/poor contrast/off centered/wonky/poorly processed" even if we didn't think they were at the time of submission. Sometimes people get a rejection for one of these criteria (perhaps with the exception of ignorantly "wonky" without context) but these are intrinsic to the highest standards of image quality regardless of A.net standards or indoctrination !!!...the same blurry/unsharp/poor contrast/off centered/wonky/poorly processed image will still appear elsewhere and still lack quality but may be of interest to others and I accept have the potential to be published, I appreciate that. I mentioned examples of more of the subjective rejection criteria which can be more difficult to personally accept as Rejections. I also have images on other sites and appreciate that most of those will not make it here.

[Edited 2010-11-02 18:01:42]
 
dlowwa
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 1:18 am

Quoting JakTrax (Reply 28):
Was over 12 months ago now. BA 747 crossing the old 'through' road at the LHR maintenance area, with a huge queue of traffic waiting at the flashing gates.

I thought you might be referring to that one, in which case it is slightly disingenuous of you to state "but a tiny signpost (which didn't cover any part of the aircraft) was seen as killing the motive." when in fact a signpost is blocking part of the aircraft, along with a fence and several vehicles which together block an even larger portion of the aircraft. Anyway, a different topic for a different time perhaps.
 
zbot69
Posts: 151
Joined: Thu May 14, 2009 10:29 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 4:07 am

Quoting Evedwards1990 (Thread starter):
I know that a lot of you get your photos rejected, no matter how well you did. We all get rejected from time to time. Yes, airliners only racks up the top notch of quality, and weeds out the poor stuff. Only the best of the best get shown.

*Cough cough*

As I type this today's "Photo of the Day" is a shot featuring.... pillows. That's right. Pillows. Nice big gorgeous fat plump fluffy pillows. Center frame too. Tres chique. All the shot is missing for my five star vote is the ubiquitous greasy headed bald guy... he musta not been on that flight. This should cheer you up... when you have some time... browse through the Top 3000 A.net shots... and marvel at how many _hundreds_ of those classic GORGEOUS photos run afoul of today's submission criteria. Photo with two MILLION photo views... that baby has four gigs I can think of right off the top of my head that would make the screeners cringe in agony. It's funny that the photos that actually _made_ A.net the site it is today wouldn't even make it through the front door. Knee slapping hilarious if you ask me.

See? So smile. It's all about achieving "perfection." Level. Color balanced. Sleek. Sunny. Shiny. Sharp. Oh, and pillowy. And did I forget centered? Make sure it's centered. Like those pillows. Nice and centered.
 
evedwards1990
Topic Author
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RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 4:16 am

Quoting TupolevTu154 (Reply 16):

If only, if only I had the time...
 
javibi
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Joined: Sat Oct 02, 2004 5:55 pm

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 7:38 am

Quoting emmerson (Reply 26):
off centered
Quoting NZ107 (Reply 27):
getting the subject in the middle of the frame

Funny still a lot of people here think of an"off center subject" as a bad thing  
 
macairmetro
Posts: 34
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 10:25 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 8:45 am

Oh, I don't cope very well at all...

When I open the email and read the words,"We have had to reject...." I go into a massive rage!

I lift my feet slightly off the ground while sitting at the desk and push back forcibly with my palms against the desk edge, conscious of the fact my face is now filling with blood and in my best John McEnroe voice scream back at the monitor..., "YOU GUYS...CANNOT ...BE SERIOUS!!". I then usually grab a soft stress toy and throw it at the monitor, hoping it doesn't ricochet back and hit me in the forehead, which has happened a couple of times. When that happens I get really angry and pull off my sweat headband and flick it too at the monitor at total outrage. I then usually slump to the floor into the fetus position and cry inconsolably until my partner walks in from work and looks at me with much scorn. She quips, "Another rejection honey....". I then get up and help her prepare dinner.....


There's got to be a way you can see aircraft somewhere where you live....they don't have to be all heavies you know. What about a GA airfield, try and talk to others in the A.Net community who may live close to you and tag along. Where there's a will there's a way. Yes, everyone has rejections, I had I think seventeen before one of my own pictures was accepted. But you know what - I learned something from each one which adds to your knowledge even if they aren't displayed on the site. As others have stated, it's got to be fun for you, that's No.1.

Regards

Macairmetro

P.S. A little (or a lot!) poetic license was used to prepare this post! For those too young to know who John McEnroe is, just Google "you cannot be serious"
 
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NZ107
Posts: 4946
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2005 6:51 pm

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 8:48 am

Quoting javibi (Reply 33):

Not entirely, I was using it as an example because A.Net somewhat requires it. But generally speaking, the ultimate basics of taking pictures- amateurs tend to cut things in half so teaching them to centre it instead of trying to do something artsy and failing miserably is more likely going to lead to more praise for the image than say someone whose head is chopped off above the eyes.
 
GPHOTO
Posts: 799
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2004 11:44 pm

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 1:32 pm

Quoting dendrobatid (Reply 21):
I take your point here as contrast rejections can sometimes be difficult to determine

This is an area that can be very difficult for some of us to determine. As I, like many males, have one of the various types of colour blindness, things look somewhat different to what the average guy sees. This can make colour casts and contrast issues more tricky to detect - what looks fine to me, at least at first glance, will have a glaring issue for someone else. So for those of us who get contrast and colour cast rejections due to having different eye set-ups, this will be very nice! With help, I can pick these things up, that help usually being the rejection e-mail (boo!), but without someone pointing it out the effect is often too subtle for me to see very easily.

Thanks to Mick's help some time back, I've managed to tweak my workflow to reduce problems, but it can still be a challenge at times. And then there is always the danger of overcorrecting and going too far the other way.

I recall a friend of mine with the same type of colour blindness as myself, but more severe, showing me an article he had found with pictures that were touched up to show us how 'normally' sighted people view a scene. There were also images retouched to show people how we see the world. The differences were remarkable, my wife was rather surprised at how differently I see things. The good news is I am now excused from decorating duty.

Best regards,

Jim
 
PMN
Posts: 547
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2005 7:44 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 3:03 pm

I've kind of come to the conclusion there are far, far more important things in life than getting annoyed because some photos get rejected on a website. I may appeal the odd one if I disagree but if it's rejected again then so be it, it's not the end of the world. Then again I did have all of my last 15 uploads accepted so I'm pretty happy at the moment!
 
JakTrax
Posts: 5267
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2005 3:30 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 3:21 pm

Quoting dlowwa (Reply 30):
I thought you might be referring to that one, in which case it is slightly disingenuous of you to state "but a tiny signpost (which didn't cover any part of the aircraft) was seen as killing the motive." when in fact a signpost is blocking part of the aircraft, along with a fence and several vehicles which together block an even larger portion of the aircraft. Anyway, a different topic for a different time perhaps

When it appeared in the feedback forum a screener told me that the small signpost bottom left killed it. That's the sign I was referring to and it isn't blocking the aircraft. My statement was not a criticism - I love the photo but appreciate it perhaps wasn't right for here. I still think the row of traffic, etc. all adds to the experience of seeing a 747 being dragged across a public road and this image has attracted a lot of attention elsewhere. I remember people having very divided opinions at the time but you can't deny that the main focus of the image is the aircraft?

If you wanted this unique shot, you had to simply put up with the surroundings.

Karl
 
hotplane
Posts: 729
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 10:44 pm

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 4:36 pm

Quoting Evedwards1990 (Thread starter):
So, how do you guys cope with it?

Give up and get all your shots removed! That's what I did.
 
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f4wso
Posts: 942
Joined: Sun Oct 19, 2003 1:58 pm

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 5:19 pm

Each rejection is an opportunity to examine my technique to see if I can make an improvement. If I get a lot of rejections in a string for the same reason, I recheck my calibration settings. I have found the screeners to be helpful, sharing the common ground of an interest in photography and aviation.

There are conventions here that vary from other photography standards but each publication has editorial standards. i have had successful sales with images rejected here and I have never had a rejection email telling me to delete an image from my personal collection.  

There are some challenges. Two of mine are soft and level. Soft can be tough because there is never a resolution panel (like I usedfor calibrating aerial mapping cameras) in the picture. Level is another issue since a vertical datum can be difficult to ascertain.
 
user47
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:56 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Wed Nov 03, 2010 11:45 pm

I don't. I post elsewhere and I'm happy with the results. I'm always open to feedback but like others I find the rating and approval criteria to be highly subjective. Don't get me wrong... I find utility in the forums here and I enjoy looking at all the great work hosted by anet but I see no reason to subject myself to the "stress" of rejections.

My work is good enough to be used by NPR.org, US News & World report, a few small time publications as well as a few airlines, all without the publicity of anet. Sometimes I receive compensation, sometimes it's just a bragging right. That works for me.

I'm just a hobbiest. I may want to go pro and make money in the future but for now my photography is for my own enjoyment.

[Edited 2010-11-03 16:51:28]
 
photopilot
Posts: 3101
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2002 11:16 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Thu Nov 04, 2010 12:16 am

Coping???? LOL......

When A.net starts paying to host our images, (I'm not holding my breath) then I'll start caring what their criteria is. Until then, my efforts and attention goes to my paying clients and a.net gets the throw-away images that I'm not using elsewhere. Top-of-the-Day or Hits don't buy groceries or the new lens I want. IMHO, it's silly to sweat over what really isn't important in the great scheme of things.
 
NicolasRubio
Posts: 566
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2005 11:45 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Thu Nov 04, 2010 12:26 am

I had enough with the sites arguable - to say the least - policies and rejection reasons. For that reason I only upload certain photographs (news mostly).

I'm lucky enough to have one of the best jobs an aviation photographer could think of, and that's why I don't really care that much for A.Net any more.

The best advice I can give you is: if you don't enjoy it, then don't do it. I started with aviation photography because I really enjoy it... and that is probably the case of the majority of us here, so I won't let anyone or anything get between me and that joy!



Best regards,

Nico Rubio
 
cpd
Posts: 6822
Joined: Sat Jun 28, 2008 4:46 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Thu Nov 04, 2010 12:51 am

Quoting hotplane (Reply 39):

Give up and get all your shots removed! That's what I did.

But not everyone is so interested in doing that - it's a mighty effort to pay someone to design a website - do SEO on it and so on. A.net might have its foibles, but it is at very visible.

And although we might grumble about the rejections sometimes, the screeners are pretty consistent - and at the moment, seem to be working at a feverish rate, so the queue is at least kept to a reasonable length.

Quoting NicolasRubio (Reply 44):
I'm lucky enough to have one of the best jobs an aviation photographer could think of, and that's why I don't really care that much for A.Net any more.

Very lucky person you are.   Although I don't do this stuff permanent full time, it's a nice side thing and a good change from my daily duties. So it's a nice balance.
 
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dvincent
Posts: 1592
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2007 9:53 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Thu Nov 04, 2010 2:07 am

The only reason a rejection would bug me nowadays is because I have to wait another week or whatever for the queue to turn over. There are times when I might be expecting a rejection and decide to push the envelope to see what happens.

The last time I really disagreed with a rejection was, I think, a shot of the laser platform 707 from the Wright-Paterson Museum around January. There might have been one other since then, but it's so infrequent that I would appeal or argue something that it doesn't stick out to me.
 
NicolasRubio
Posts: 566
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2005 11:45 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Thu Nov 04, 2010 2:04 pm

Quoting cpd (Reply 44):
Very lucky person you are. Although I don't do this stuff permanent full time, it's a nice side thing and a good change from my daily duties. So it's a nice balance.

I agree with you Chris! I still do it as a hobby, too! It is a kind of "therapy" for me...
 
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EZEIZA
Posts: 4421
Joined: Sat Aug 21, 2004 12:09 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Thu Nov 04, 2010 7:42 pm

The only rejections that had angered me in the past were the motive rejections. I couldn't (and still can't) understand them. They are so sibjective to whoever is screening that it's a lottery; if you're luclky it'll be accepted and if you're not it won't. And anet, being the nu,ber 1 site, should not depend on luck.
Having said that, I don't get bothered by rejections any more. First and most important; because its just not worth it, after all this is for 99.9% of us a hobby (my good frien Nico is REALLY lucky, belive me   ),
Now, as the OP stated, he gets to see planes once a year .. in that case forget about anet. Enjoy the airport session, shoot for yourself, and then once you see the pics on the screen you'll decide if you want to go through the process of anet, but again, enjoy spotting, especially when you cant do it often  
 
klm77
Posts: 150
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 9:36 pm

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Fri Nov 05, 2010 4:06 am

Quoting JakTrax (Reply 23):
One thing I have noticed (especially with the younger folks) is that some kind of try and run before they can walk. They fail to look closely at the standard of accepted work, take a shot they THINK looks like something they've seen in the database (it's rarely similar!) then kick off when it's rejected. That, "How dare you reject my shot!" attitude. Often these people calm down and eventually succeed but some refuse to listen to sound advice or, if they do, never implement it. The whole, "I know better" thing.

You know it's funny because when I was reading this I thought "You couldn't be anymore right". The reason i'm saying that is because I did the exact same thing. I've realized recently after talking to other photographers that it doesn't really matter if you get your photos accepted on a.net or not because if you love aviation and photography.... then you shouldn't really care whether a photo is accepted or rejected. This doesn't go to say that i'm not happy when a photo gets accepted, or may still get ticked off for a second when I see a "we had to reject your photo" but I've learned to not really care that much and move along unlike before when I would jump out of my seat without realizing and paying close attention to the photo and why it got rejected.
 
cpd
Posts: 6822
Joined: Sat Jun 28, 2008 4:46 am

RE: Coping With Having Photos Rejected

Fri Nov 05, 2010 4:40 am

Quoting NicolasRubio (Reply 46):
I agree with you Chris! I still do it as a hobby, too! It is a kind of "therapy" for me...

That's exactly how I see it. It also keeps me close to what I love - I do love aviation, and I wish I'd got into that. It didn't happen like that - so the photography is a close enough alternative.

I think a lot of people come along with ideas of grandeur, but you certainly get brought down to earth by the first rejections.   I think I knew what the start would be like thanks to advice from an NZ photographer who used to submit photos to this site. Now he does weddings and other photography - but that was how I got started here.

I think I took about 4 or so images before my first images were accepted. I had two accepted at once, funnily enough. Which was a very big thing. Now I don't upload that many photos. I try to do harder to get photos most of the time. But sometimes I'll just dump most of my memory card into the queue (ie, 10 or 12 photos at a time).

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