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Sony A6000 For Aviation Spotting

Posted: Tue Nov 03, 2015 7:55 pm
by jpms87
HI,

I starting in plane spotting currently using a Canon T3 + 700mm lens for my spotting, however I want to upgrade my camera and found interesting the advantages provided by mirroless camaras.

I have seen 100s of youtube reviews, however still want to get confirmation about Sony A6000 for plane spotting:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sony-alpha-a6000

So here are my questions:

Do you recommend Sony A6000 for plane spotting?
Have you tried A6000 for plane spotting?


Thanks in advance for all feedback you may provide.

Thanks

RE: Sony A6000 For Aviation Spotting

Posted: Tue Nov 03, 2015 8:25 pm
by oly720man
There are some with that camera and have photos on this site, see here

https://www.airliners.net/search/phot..._id+desc&page_limit=15&thumbnails=

so you can see the possibilities.

There may be other users but not everyone says which camera they use.

RE: Sony A6000 For Aviation Spotting

Posted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 7:36 pm
by clickhappy
I carry a Sony a6000 as a walk-around cam. I am quite happy with the image quality (although one must be realistic about what to expect). Sometimes when with friends on the ramp I let it rip at 11/fps, just for fun. AF is very fast, even in low light. I have only used the kit lens that came with it, and I certainly haven't 'pushed' it in tough conditions, but the more I shoot it, the more I like it. I've played around with the ability to control it from my phone, etc. Not something I would really use in the field, but I guess some people might?

The battery is quite small, so I would recommend getting a second one to keep charged up and handy.

For me the benefit of such a camera is that it is 'less threatening' then a DSLR. It is much easier to walk around a ramp or a boneyard with such a camera. My experience is that people see a big camera + lens and they think you are a pro or something.

Another downside is that the lenses are expensive and the selection is not that great, but I hear Sigma makes some small, inexpensive primes that produce quality results.

RE: Sony A6000 For Aviation Spotting

Posted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 8:01 pm
by Kaphias
Thanks Royal for chiming in– I've seen your a6000 images in the DB and they look quite nice.


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Photo © Royal S King



Not to hijack Juan's topic, but I'm looking to upgrade from my Nikon S6000 (wow) and have been trying to decide between a high-end P&S such as the Canon G7x or Sony RX100 and a small Micro 4/3 such as the a6000 or Olympus OM-D E-M10. I value portability, but the P&S cameras don't have the tele reach that I'm looking for. The a6000 seems to be a good compromise because of it's small size with the 16-50 attached, or the potential reach with the 55-210. It's also super cheap right now, $700 with the 16-50 (best buy) or 18-55 (costco) and the 55-210.

There's so much out there on the a6000, but little if any on it being used for aviation photography, so being able to hear from you is greatly appreciated.

RE: Sony A6000 For Aviation Spotting

Posted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 10:00 pm
by dvincent
Unfortunately the a6000 does not have the performance with adapted lenses that the A7Rmk2 and the A7mk2 do with their latest firmware updates. In fact the A6000 won't use PDAF at all with adapted lenses.

Hopefully the A6100 will resolve this issue. Otherwise, you will be tough up for telephoto options. Otherwise, if you are interested in high performance EVF shooting, check out the a77mk2. It's inexpensive and has excellent performance, but it is not a compact mirrorless camera; it's still SLR sized.

RE: Sony A6000 For Aviation Spotting

Posted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 10:31 pm
by Kaphias
Quoting dvincent (Reply 4):

Unfortunately the a6000 does not have the performance with adapted lenses that the A7Rmk2 and the A7mk2 do with their latest firmware updates. In fact the A6000 won't use PDAF at all with adapted lenses.

Hopefully the A6100 will resolve this issue. Otherwise, you will be tough up for telephoto options. Otherwise, if you are interested in high performance EVF shooting, check out the a77mk2. It's inexpensive and has excellent performance, but it is not a compact mirrorless camera; it's still SLR sized.

I understand why this would be a concern for more serious photographers who either have lenses already or would be looking to greatly expand their collection, but I'm not in that situation. Not being a serious photographer, I don't for see ever truly wanting more than 200mm, nor a $500+ lens. I'm just not that into it, a point made clear by the fact that I've stuck it out with a $150 full-auto point and shoot for the last 5 years. The bigger, SLR-style cameras certainly have their advantages, but I really want something that I can put a small lens on and stick in my jacket pocket. Aviation is a large part of what I shoot, hence the need for a decently long lens, but its far from all, and being able to take a smaller package on hikes, walking about town, or even up the ski hill is something I'd like. I think the a6000 is probably about the limit as far as that goes.

RE: Sony A6000 For Aviation Spotting

Posted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 11:21 pm
by clickhappy
The a77 is like 3x the price of the a6000, why bring it up at all? Completely irrelevant in this conversation.

I've used the Canon Gx bodies and the larger sensor of the a6000 is superior. Also, remember that the a6000 is an APC-S sized sensor (1.5x) while the micro 4/3 bodies are 2x 35mm focal lengths.

RE: Sony A6000 For Aviation Spotting

Posted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 12:40 am
by dvincent
Quoting Kaphias (Reply 5):
I understand why this would be a concern for more serious photographers who either have lenses already or would be looking to greatly expand their collection, but I'm not in that situation. Not being a serious photographer, I don't for see ever truly wanting more than 200mm, nor a $500+ lens. I'm just not that into it, a point made clear by the fact that I've stuck it out with a $150 full-auto point and shoot for the last 5 years. The bigger, SLR-style cameras certainly have their advantages, but I really want something that I can put a small lens on and stick in my jacket pocket. Aviation is a large part of what I shoot, hence the need for a decently long lens, but its far from all, and being able to take a smaller package on hikes, walking about town, or even up the ski hill is something I'd like. I think the a6000 is probably about the limit as far as that goes.

I was more replying to the OP, who was using a Canon SLR, but those are valid concerns. I use the RX100 as part of my arsenal but I do not use it for moving subjects. I use that as my "go anywhere" camera. But if you plan on going beyond 210mm, the a6000 will be tough. As long as you're OK with staying around that focal length, it'll work great. It has excellent AF performance with native glass. While not for aviation, the eye-tracking autofocus is brilliant. Inside places like museums and air shows, the APS E-mount cameras are stealthy and provide great IQ with minimal weight.

When it comes to telephotos, there's only two real E-mount options, which are the 55-210 and the 70-200 G. Any other option required adapted lenses, which do not function at all with PDAF on the a6000. You'll need an LA-EA4 to use any A-mount lens with any telephoto reach. But that does open up several good options, like the Sony 70-300 and 70-400 G lenses.

The 18-55 is a better lens optically than the 16-50, but the 16-50 is much more compact. Neither one is always the correct choice, but it is important to keep it in mind.

Quoting clickhappy (Reply 6):
The a77 is like 3x the price of the a6000, why bring it up at all? Completely irrelevant in this conversation.

Body only, you can get an a77mk2 for $850 at reputable dealers, which is only $200 more than an a6000 and an A-mount 18-55 is only $100 more on top of that, and the A-mount 55-300 is cheaper than the E-mount 55-210. In terms of performance, it is a screamer of a deal. If you get a kit with the 16-50 f/2.8, which is a premium lens, yes, it will cost three times the price, but that lens is not mandatory and is only one option of many. even then, it was only one part of my post as showing an alternative option if long lenses were of a concern.

I'm just mentioning the potential alternatives, that's all. It's not irrelevant to know what else is out there, because you're buying into a system, not just a camera. My larger point is that right now, E-mount is really tough on telephoto lens selection, and anyone buying into the system must be aware of that. This doesn't take away from what the cameras can do, it's just something people need to know and be OK with before going in.

RE: Sony A6000 For Aviation Spotting

Posted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 11:04 am
by Tankdiver
I use my A6000 for spotting. I just started spotting so I'm still trying to get the hang of it. The A6000 is a great camera and light so I don't have to set it down while waiting for the next aircraft to arrive.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5709/22694383437_b25b2220f9_b.jpgDSC02800 by Jimmy Vu, on Flickr

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5821/22720458149_ba9c8264e7_b.jpgDSC02698 by Jimmy Vu, on Flickr

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5783/22694389707_38586a2f9f_b.jpgDSC02585 by Jimmy Vu, on Flickr

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5833/21998794309_2d05842dde_b.jpgVietnam Airlines A350-900 VN-A886 by Jimmy Vu, on Flickr

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7292/16453772648_20fc41e6cb_b.jpgCI 747-400F Landing at SGN by Jimmy Vu, on Flickr

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5752/22490117564_bd2db47976_b.jpgDSC02966 by Jimmy Vu, on Flickr

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/752/23086824926_06cf221120_b.jpgDSC02661 by Jimmy Vu, on Flickr

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5632/22490164784_cc1b56a55d_b.jpgDSC02606 by Jimmy Vu, on Flickr

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/670/23086657306_3c1fab7252_b.jpgDSC02970 by Jimmy Vu, on Flickr