HAL
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Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 6:52 am

"Life is what happens while you are waiting for your wishes to come true".

The one thing that I try not to do is to ignore what is going on around me while time goes on. It's been almost a year since I posted my last pilot trip report for America West, and I have been greatly enjoying my life during that time. But now that I am comfortably back in the cockpit for Hawaiian Airlines, I thought it would be a good time to offer another glimpse of what I do in the course of my job.

I had been sitting close to the top of the furlough list at Hawaiian for nearly three years when I got the call last spring offering me my position back. I had to decide whether to go back, bypass and stay with America West, or resign my position completely at Hawaiian. I won't go into all the details of what I had to consider, but some of the issues included pay, seniority, and quality of life. In the end, I decided to go back to Hawaiian. I have nothing but respect for the people at America West, and I greatly appreciate the chance to fly for them and the experiences I gained there.

Last May I began re-learning the 767, and by June was on-line and flying. As opposed to my previous time at Hawaiian though, I am now based in Honolulu instead of Seattle. This means I have to begin each set of trips by commuting from Seattle to the islands. But since I had been commuting for two years with America West, it isn't that much different -- just a longer flight. This new base also means that I am flying a much wider variety of trips than before. In the Seattle base I flew almost exclusively the SEA-HNL and SEA-OGG (Maui) flights. Now I do everything except those trips.

While I was on furlough Hawaiian began flying to Sydney Australia. Ever since I came back I have been bidding for those trips, but they were always picked up by pilots more senior than me -- until this month. Here is a report from one of those trips.

DAY ONE: SEA-HNL

My Sydney trip came at the beginning of an eight-day stretch of work. Since the flight to Sydney leaves before any of our flights arrive from the west coast, I had to commute into Honolulu the day before. We now have two flights a day from Seattle to Honolulu on four days of the week, and a single flight the other three. There is also a daily flight to Maui, which I can use as a backup if necessary. I had listed myself for standby on our company's employee website, and showed up in plenty of time for the 8:05am departure. This was flight 27, on aircraft 589HA. In just the last few weeks Hawaiian has switched gates from the 'A' concourse to the 'B' concourse. This allows us to use two gates at a time instead of just one, which is a very good thing when we have three flights leaving in a two-and-a-half hour window. The flight was almost completely full, but I did get a seat -- 16H, an aisle seat on the right side just ahead of the wing. Before I stowed my bags I pulled out a couple of books and my iPod and put them in the seat pocket. The weather was cold but mostly clear, with remnants of morning fog drifting over the airport. Because of the fog and the temperatures, a good coating of frost clung to the plane. Once everyone was onboard we had to wait several minutes to deice. The Captain did a very good job keeping us appraised of how far along the deicers were, and how much longer is should take. I had flown with this Captain many times before while based in Seattle, and he is great to work with -- much like the entire pilot group at Hawaiian. Many people don't realize that Hawaiian has been existence as a continuously operating airline since 1929 with an impeccable safety record. During the 1980's and '90's Hawaiian had an extensive charter operation that had crews flying for weeks at a time literally all over the world. I don't know of a more experienced or more professional pilot group anywhere else.

Outside the fog rolled in an out, occasionally blanketing the airport and restricting the view to a few hundred feet. Then it would drift away and the shallow morning sunlight would give the world outside a sparkling monochrome tint of gray and white frost. The cold winter weather muted all the other colors, even the vibrant purple on the tail of our plane. The workers outside were bundled in heavy clothing, their breath making tiny fog banks of their own as they trundled around prepping our plane for its flight to paradise. Inside the plane however there was hula music on the PA system, and the smell of guava juice and tropical flowers, all reminders of where we were going.

The deice trucks did their job, and we pushed back onto the ramp, about fifteen minutes late. The engines started and we taxied to the north end of the airport where, with little traffic, we pulled right onto the runway and took off. I sat next to a very nice lady who worked as a flight attendant for a corporate-jet leasing operation. She was going to Hawaii to start a week-long excursion around several parts of the Pacific aboard a Gulfstream G550, and our conversation reminded me of how many different jobs are available within our own small industry.

I've gotten good at finding ways to pass the time on these commutes, and with the help of my iPod and a good book ('Saturday', by Ian McEwan -- check it out), we were soon descending into Honolulu. We landed on runway 8L and pulled into gate 34 for a flight time of 5:38. I went to our crew room to check my mailbox and then went to the parking lot to get the car for the drive to the house I stay at. Commuting to Honolulu is a bit different for me than commuting to Las Vegas was with America West. At AWA all the trips left in the evening, and I could commute in the day of the trip, and get home the same day it ended. With Hawaiian that doesn't work because many of the trips start late-morning or early afternoon, preventing me from coming in the same day. Also, I try and bunch up as many trips as I can in a row, so I don't have to commute across the Pacific any more than necessary. That means that I often spend a day or so in Honolulu between trips and need a place to stay. Therefore I am renting a room from another pilot here, and share a car with another commuter in the same house. I stopped at the grocery store on the way in, and picked up something to eat for the night. Nobody else was at the house that night, so I settled in for a quiet evening of studying, as my yearly recurrent training was looming in a couple weeks.

DAY TWO, HNL-SYD

I arrived at the airport about two-and-a-half hours before departure because I wanted to get some film for my camera and change some money to Australian dollars. The crew room was empty because the big afternoon arrival/departure bank for the 767's hadn't started, and the morning crews on the 717's were all out flying. The Captain for our trip soon showed up, and I introduced myself. Since I had spent all the time before my furlough based in Seattle, there were a lot of Honolulu pilots that I hadn't met before. It is a benefit to being based in HNL that I'm finally getting to meet the rest of the pilot group here.

FAA regulations prohibit two-man crews from flying more than eight hours a day, so for the Sydney flight we have to add another pilot. We use First Officers (FO's) that are type-rated in the plane (most of us already are) as 'Relief Officers'. Our RO showed up -- an FO that I hadn't met before either, and we all took a look at the flight plan and weather information for the trip. It looked to be a pleasant flight, with only a small area of isolated thunderstorms just south of the equator. Since I hadn't done a SYD trip before, the Captain explained the differences to me, and then we all left for the plane.

At the gate we showed the agent our ID's and boarded aircraft N581HA. Since there are three pilots the procedures differ a little from normal. The RO went outside to do the inspection while I got the paperwork ready. The Captain would fly the leg down, and I would fly back in a couple days. Getting ready for any overwater flight takes more preparation than a typical domestic flight like I used to do with AWA. Overwater flights fall under the ETOPS rules, which stand for Extended-range Twin-engined OPerationS (and no, it doesn't stand for Engines Turn Or Passengers Swim). Those rules allow two-engined aircraft to fly passengers across areas where the nearest alternate airport is further away than the 60 minutes normally allowed. In order to fly ETOPS the airline and aircraft have to establish equipment reliability and procedures that ensure the safety of the flight. Additional equipment is required on the aircraft such as dual backup electrical generators, and fire suppression equipment for the cargo holds that can last for over three hours. Before each flight the mechanics must do a more rigorous inspection of the aircraft including all fluid levels (oil, hydraulic, etc), and ensure that a much more stringent set of rules on inoperative equipment is met. For instance if you are flying a 767 from Los Angeles to Denver it is OK to go without one of the engine-driven electrical generators, but not if you're flying under ETOPS rules.

From the pilot's perspective, there isn't that much difference in going to SYD versus the west coast of the US. There are a few paperwork changes, and some technical differences in the dispatch procedures that I won't get into, but in general we enter the flightplan information into the airplane's computer, check that all the systems operate properly, and that our weight and balance data is valid. There is a whole lot more fuel onboard a SYD flight than I am used to though. In this case we had just over 140,000 pounds for a 10+ hour flight. Normally for the west coast we have about 70,000 pounds or so. If you want to do the math, jet fuel weighs about 6.7 pounds per gallon. We use pounds for our calculations, because that more accurately reflects our needs -- figuring out how much the aircraft weighs for takeoff.

Once the preflight checks were done all we had to do was wait for the boarding to finish. Our ground staff did their usual excellent job and we pushed back one minute earlier than our scheduled departure time of 11:55am, HST. The weather in Honolulu was a bit strange with thick clouds and a wind from the southwest, instead of the normal northeast tradewinds. This meant that we would depart from runway 26L, the reef runway. Once clear of the terminal we were allowed to start our engines, and once the second one began turning we let the tug crew go on to their next job. With both engines started I called for our taxi clearance, and the tower cleared us to cross 26R, and head toward the south ramp. We paralleled the cargo and flight school operations on the south ramp, then turned toward the end of runway 26L. There weren't any other aircraft ahead of us, and as we approached the end of the runway we were given our takeoff clearance. It is a credit to the power of the 767 that even though we were close to our maximum takeoff weight (over 400,000 pounds) the takeoff roll felt like one from a much lighter flight. Our takeoff speeds were higher than I had seen before though, with our rotation speed set at 164 knots (about 188 mph). We climbed away from the airport, and turned toward the southwest and our first fix on the track toward Australia.

The tower turned us over to departure control, and from there we switched to Honolulu Center. About twenty minutes after takeoff we leveled at 32,000 feet, our initial cruising altitude. Having a three man crew means that we can each take breaks along the way. We all sit in the cockpit for the takeoff and landing, but enroute we need to take breaks so we don't spend more than eight hours actually at the controls. Since I hadn't been to Australia before I wanted to be around for the more interesting and different parts, and those came in the later parts of the flight. So I was given the first rest shift, and once the initial cruise paperwork had been finished, I went back to our 'rest area' which is in fact a seat in first class that is reserved for us. Our flight attendants were just beginning their lunch/dinner service so I put away my book and enjoyed a rare treat for an airline employee these days -- a first class meal. White linen tablecloths, china plates, and real silverware (except the knives of course) were set on my tray table. Next came the salad along with a taro roll. The main course was a swordfish steak crusted with herbed crab meat served on soba noodles, and dessert was a chocolate something-or-other with whipped cream on top. Being part of the crew meant that I didn't have a choice of entrees (there are three), but get whatever is left after the paying passengers have chosen. I didn't mind, because all three choices were excellent. For a guy used to the average crewmeal, (leather, feather, or fin -- the typical choices), it sure was nice to be able to stretch out and enjoy a dinner inflight. Hawaiian has won numerous awards for our service in First Class and in Coach, and I was glad to be able to experience it again. Once the meal was done I reclined the seat and read my book until it was time to go back up front -- about three hours after I had left.

I called the cockpit on the intercom, and with a flight attendant guarding the door, I switched places with the Captain. The RO took the Captain's seat, and I took mine while the Captain went back to enjoy his break. It was a calm day in the mid-Pacific, but on the weather charts we knew there would be some activity once we crossed the equator. The track we were on was nearly a straight line from Hawaii to the northeast coast of Australia, and is one of three that are available to our dispatch planners. They pick the route that provides the most efficient flight, as well as avoiding any bad weather, and today we were on the most westerly of the three routes. We crossed the equator just a few miles east of the 180 degree longitude line, half way around the planet from London England. At the same time we switched control from Oakland Oceanic to Nadi Control in Fiji. There are really no uncontrolled areas of airspace, even across the vast reaches of the Pacific. The US controls a large swath of the eastern half of the Pacific, while other sections are controlled by other entities. The only difference as far as we can see though is the name of who we call on the radio, and sometimes their accent.

We made position reports at the established waypoints along our track, and called them in on the HF (High Frequency) radio. This differs from the normal VHF radios we use in that they have a much longer range, but often at the expense of clarity. Imagine putting your head inside a large metal can, then having your friends rub sandpaper and rocks on the outside while another friend yells at you from about fifty yards away. That is what using HF radio is like. In the old days it was worse because one of the pilots had to keep a constant listen for their callsign -- a sure recipe for a headache by touchdown. Today we have what is called a selcal system that allows ATC to send a special tone over the radio, which then sets off a chime in the cockpit. We know that we have been called and turn up the volume. These position reports let the air traffic controllers know where we are, when we got there, where we are going next, and what time we expect to get there. Their computers crunch those numbers and come up with a pretty good idea where everyone is at a particular moment. Even though there is no radar coverage over the open ocean, they are still able to keep us apart based on our position reports.

Starting just south of the equator we saw some buildups on the radar. Most were off to the side, but one good sized cell was planted right on our track. We called Nadi and asked for permission to deviate for the weather. The cleared us for 30 miles on either side of the track. We did a little zigging and zagging, and about forty-five minutes later reached the clear air on the other side of the thunderstorms. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is a semi-permanent feature when flying through that part of the world where the air flowing toward the equator from the poles meets, moves upward, and spawns some occasionally unbelievable storms. They were pretty mild for us though, and we were soon in the clear.

The Captain came back to the cockpit, and the RO went aft to take his rest. We had passed over some islands just south of the equator, but they were hidden by the clouds. Looking at our charts, we saw that around twelve degrees south we'd be passing just east of some very small islands and we started looking for them. We saw them, tiny uninhabited rocks in a vast ocean. They were the far east end of the Solomon Islands, called the Santa Cruz Islands. Further ahead on our track though were some much larger islands. We flew directly over the town of Santos on Espiritu Santo Island, part of Vanuatu. The islands were quite large, and lushly green. The coral reefs around their edges sparkled in green and blue, and small white clouds dotted the air over the islands. To our left were the town of Port Villa and Vanuatu's capitol, and Pentecost Island, famous for their 'land divers', early predecessors of today's bungee jumpers. The track we were following made a slight southerly turn at Santos, and about forty minutes later we flew over the north end of New Caledonia. There is an enormous reef system off the northern end of that island, and it looked like a divers paradise in that crystal clear water.

We were chasing the sun across the sky, and in the seven or so hours that had passed since takeoff, it looked like only a few hours had passed by the position of the sun. Now we were over the XXX sea, and the next landmass ahead was Australia. Just after passing New Caledonia we switched from Nadi control to Brisbane. A crisp Aussie accent greeted us on our first waypoint in their airspace, another sign that the trip was nearing its end. Along the way we had been monitoring our fuel usage, and we were exactly on the plan. It felt good to be in this plane, stretching our collective legs, whispering along in what seemed to be a never ending day, with the plane doing exactly what it was designed to do; take hundreds of people in comfort and safety to far distant places. I have always liked doing long-haul flying, and this trip proved it again for me.

The RO came up to the cockpit as we approached the shoreline. A couple hundred miles offshore of Brisbane, our route turned further south, nearly paralleling the coast as we continued toward Sydney. We could see huge thunderstorms in the distance over the Australian outback, but the shoreline itself was hidden in the afternoon mist. We started talking to Brisbane Center on the VHF radio again once we were less than 150 miles from the coast. Traffic into Sydney was light and I saw only a couple planes crossing the sky in the distance. Along the way the Captain had been passing on tips and hints to me about the differences we'd see in Australian airspace as opposed to the US. They were minor, and I didn't feel any apprehension as we started our descent. ATC turned us toward the airport, which sits south of the city of Sydney, its runways poking out into Botany Bay. As we descended I could see the city itself sitting alongside Sydney harbor out my window. We would be landing to the north on runway 34L. Approach control turned us over to the tower, and we were cleared to land. As we turned onto final and flew over the bay we were pointed almost directly at downtown Sydney, and I again felt a rush of excitement at the thought of visiting a place I had heard about for so long, but had never been to. The wind was gusting from our right, but the Captain made a beautiful landing past a waiting Austrian Airlines aircraft, and we rolled onto the taxiway as we slowed to walking speed. The RO had called ahead to our operations people in Sydney, and we were assigned gate 53. It was a short taxi to our gate, which had us parking next to an Emirates 777. We came to a stop and shut down for a total block time of 10:13. It was still daylight, and I wasn't even tired -- just excited to have finally made the trip. Sydney is three hours behind Honolulu, or more accurately, twenty one hour ahead since we had crossed the international dateline. We'd left HNL at noon on a Thursday, but arrived in Sydney shortly after 7pm on Friday evening.

Part of the 'Australian experience' is the bug bomb. All arriving international aircraft have to be sprayed for insects before anyone can disembark. The flight attendants opened the door for a moment to retrieve the spray from the government official there, then closed it again and walked through the cabin (and cockpit) spraying anti-bug-juice. Once that was done, they re-opened the door, and let the passengers out. After they had left we followed them down through customs, and a few minutes later we were standing outside the terminal enjoying the summer evening. It was quite a change -- and quite a long ways -- from the frosty morning in Seattle where I had begun this trip. The sun set as we waited for the bus to pick us up, and by the time we reached the hotel in downtown Sydney it was dark. As much as I hated to admit it, by the time I reached my room I knew that I was pretty tired. So I just changed my clothes, went to a nearby convenience store to get some food for the morning, and went back to the room to crash. I had nearly two days ahead to do my sightseeing, and I needed my sleep. I tried watching SkyNews (the Australian CNN), but within minutes felt my eyelids drooping. It was time for lights out, and time to rest for the next day's activities.

DAY THREE, IN SYDNEY

Since this is a trip report and not a travel magazine, I won't cover this too much, other than to say that if you haven't been to Sydney, by all means do it. The city is modern, clean, and the residents are friendly and active. There were people all over the place walking, jogging, or just enjoying the summer sun. I took a walking tour on my own through Hyde Park, the Botanical Gardens, around the famous Sydney Opera House, and part way across the Sydney Harbor Bridge. I stopped at a pub for lunch, had some great fish & chips, and sampled some local Australian brew (just for research purposes, of course). The Captain and RO had been here several times before, so they took a bus down to Bondi Beach, and walked all the way down to Bronte Beach. In the mean time I went back to my room, cooled off for an hour, then went out to the shopping district to find some presents to take back to my family. I found another local restaurant for dinner, and finally went to an internet café so I could e-mail everyone back home and tell them I made it safely to 'Oz'. Sydney is a busy place, especially on a Saturday night. I fell asleep to the sounds of the partiers coming and going from the pubs around the hotel.

DAY FOUR & FIVE, SYD-HNL

The return flight to Honolulu didn't leave until after 9pm, so I had almost another full day in Sydney. I took the ferry across the harbor to Manly, a beach town on the north side of the harbor. It was a Sunday and there was a large 2 kilometer open-water swimming race, and our RO and one of the flight attendants had entered. We all went over to Manly, along with several open-water swimmers from Hawaii who were in town for the race too. The water was warm and clear, and the town was fantastic. I watched most of the race, then around noon I took the ferry back to Sydney, did some last minute shopping then went to the hotel to prep for the trip home. Sleep schedules always takes a little planning when flying long-distance or redeye flights. I had gotten up early, so I could take a nap before leaving. I had my uniform ironed and ready, and turned out the lights about 2pm. I woke up at 6:30, and was ready when the van arrived at 7:20pm. It was a short ride to the airport, and we had plenty of time to wander around the extensive duty-free shops in the international terminal. The Captain and I also went to the offices of Menzies Aviation, our ground handler in SYD. They had all of our flight plans and weather information ready for us, and we went over it in the comfort of their offices, rather than in the cramped cockpit.

Our aircraft -- N583HA -- had arrived on time an hour earlier. That was good news for us, because the Sydney airport has a strict curfew on jet aircraft departing after 11pm. If we couldn't get airborne by then, we would be stuck for the night. Everything was in working order however, and we were able to start boarding on schedule. Our route back to Hawaii was on the same track that we'd flown down on, however most of the trip would be at night. The same weather pattern was in place too, with scattered thunderstorms in the ITCZ just south of the equator. There was also a jetstream moving eastward from Brisbane, which would cause some turbulence about an hour into the flight.

Our station staff is headed up by a former flight attendant of ours, and he knows how to get things ready for us, even if there are problems. Our only glitch was a late arriving fuel truck, which meant that they were still fueling the plane when we were ready to go -- it takes a lot of time to put that much gas on the plane. We only had to wait a few more minutes though, and our station manager ran downstairs to get the fuel paperwork for us. With that onboard and our final weight and balance numbers ready, we pushed back a one minute ahead of our 9:20 departure time. A Malaysian 777 had just pulled in to the gate on our right, and (I think) a Gulf Air Airbus was on our left. As we pushed back a Thai 747 taxied into a nearby gate, and a Virgin Blue plane landed on the crossing runway ahead of us. It all reminded me of what an international crossroads Sydney really is. The tug pulled us out of the tight ramp area to a spot where we could safely start our engines. We got both engines running, and let the tug crew go. From there we were cleared to taxi, but had to wait for a Virgin Atlantic A340 to go around us. We taxied up to the northern end of the field and were number one to go, off of runway 16R. It was my leg to fly, so when the tower cleared us for takeoff, the Captain turned us onto the runway, then I took over steering with the rudder pedals and applied the power. We were nearly full again, and had a lot of cargo in the belly. That put us near our maximum takeoff weight, but the 767 handled it beautifully. We climbed into the calm night sky, and once over the ocean made a big left turn to start flying northward. The lights of the coastline were beautiful, and a nearly full moon illuminated the scattered clouds below. The moonlight also reflected off the patches of open ocean inbetween the clouds and made it look like a solid, flat plain below. I turned on the autopilot, and let it guide us along our route. We leveled at 31,000 feet, staying low to avoid the worst of the turbulence associated with the jetstream over Brisbane. We stayed in contact with Brisbane Center for quite a while, until we turned more toward the northwest and moved further away from land. We turned up the lights in the cockpit as a way to keep us from falling asleep, and the Captain went back to the cabin, taking the first rest shift.

The RO and I talked about his swimming race earlier that day, and he said he was happy with his effort. Both he and the flight attendant had done well, and in fact the F/A had apparently won her age group (60+), but wouldn't be able to pick up her plaque until her next trip to SYD the following week.

Right about where we expected, we encountered a few patches of moderate turbulence, and the RO and I were kept busy slowing the plane down and watching for buildups of clouds. Having a bright moon outside helped, and when we turned down the cockpit lights it was pretty easy to see what was coming up ahead. The F/A's brought up our crewmeals, unfortunately not of the first-class variety this time. I had a spicy chicken sandwich and a bag of chips, and resigned myself to the fact that better food was an occasional luxury. Within an hour the turbulence subsided, and we were left to keep an eye on the sky for other bumps. We passed over New Caledonia again, but could only see a few lights from villages on the north end of the island. There were a few more lights peeking through the clouds over Espiritu Santo, but those too passed quickly behind us. The Captain came forward and the RO went back to sleep, still tired from his swim that day.

Long flights like this one soon turn into a steady rhythm for us, making radio calls at the waypoints, checking that our fuel burn is proceeding correctly, and that all the other systems were operating normally. We didn't see any more lights from islands below, and continued on through the moonlit night. At about ten degrees south of the equator we began to encounter the thunderstorms of the ITCZ, and as on the way down, we got a clearance to deviate around them. They were bigger than before, and we had to go as far as 30 miles off our track to get around the biggest of them. Thanks to GPS technology however we always knew exactly where we were in relation to our intended track, and it was easy to get back on it once we cleared the storms. We only saw one other plane on our track, an unknown 747 going the opposite direction 1000 feet above us. The moon had moved behind us, but still lit up the clouds below us giving the night a wonderful silky whiteness. I looked behind us out my side window and saw the constellation of the southern cross in the sky, and nearby the star Alpha Centauri shone brightly, the nearest star to our sun. As an amateur astronomer it was a treat to see the southern skies, something I just can't do from Seattle.

It was still dark shortly after we crossed the equator when the RO came back up and I took my rest break. All I brought with me was my iPod, but within minutes I could tell I was sleepy, turned it off, and closed my eyes. I awoke to bright sunshine in my eyes as a passenger to my right opened his window shade. I checked my watch and saw that about two-and-a-half hours had passed since I'd come back. The flight attendants were beginning their breakfast service -- fresh fruit, juice, and pastries. I declined the food and went back to the cockpit, still a little bleary-eyed. Fortunately the guys up front had already put up the sunshades, and after a can of Diet Coke I was back in business. We were about an hour and a half from Hawaii, and the calm morning was beautiful. The only clouds were small puffs of white cotton down close to the water, and the sunlight reflected in crystal sparkles off the gentle windblown swells below. I pulled the well-worn approach charts for Honolulu out of my flight bag and set up the computer in the plane to ensure all the appropriate waypoint were included.

As we approached the islands we could see all of them, from Kauai near us all the way to the big mountains of the Island of Hawaii -- Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. It was a very calm morning, and even the usual whitecaps were missing from the water below. Most of the time we approach the islands from the northwest, but we were coming from the southeast, which provided a new view for me. Also, instead of our normal flightpath over Honolulu with a 180 degree turn to final, we were nearly lined up for runway 8R as we descended. All we had to do was to aim for the southeast corner of Oahu, and we'd be able to make a shallow turn to final. Honolulu Center did just that for us, and we picked up the current weather as we descended -- calm winds and clear skies, and a somewhat cool 68 degrees. A cold front had passed through that night bringing cooler winter weather to the islands.

We were cleared to descend to 3000 feet, then with the airport in sight we were turned over to the tower. They cleared us to continue, advising us of another aircraft taking off from our runway ahead of us. We saw them lifting off while we were still about four miles away, and the tower cleared us to land. Getting a large plane to descend and slow down at the same time is an exercise in planning. Experience helps though, and at 1000 feet we were exactly on the glidepath and on speed, and I clicked off the autopilot and autothrottles to hand-fly it the rest of the way. Pearl Harbor passed off to our left, and the city of Honolulu and Waikiki Beach glittered directly ahead. The Koolau Mountains behind Honolulu shimmered like a folded green curtain, reminding me of why so many people love to come here for vacation. The winds were almost completely calm, so we didn't have the usual tradewind bumps while on final, and I made a very good landing right where I had planned to. We pulled off abeam our ramp, and went through the quick after-landing procedures -- putting up the flaps, turning on the APU, and turning off all the unnecessary radio gear. We parked at gate 33, and after filling out the postflight paperwork, we joined the rest of the crew who were waiting for one of the Wiki-Wiki shuttles on the upper roadway. We had shut down at 9:59am, one minute ahead of schedule, for a total block time of 9:40. We had left Sydney late Sunday evening, and thanks to the International Date Line, it was now early Sunday morning. My weekend was three days long! The shuttle took us to the customs area where we got our passports examined and declaration forms inspected. We all waved goodbye to each other, and the Captain and I went to the crew room, and from there I went out to the parking lot to go to my crashpad and catch another few hours of sleep. I had flown 19 hours and 53 minutes on the trip, but it really didn't feel like that much. There was a lot to see and do on the flights, and the 48 hours in Sydney just flew by.

That was the end of that trip, but Monday night I left on another, this one starting with a redeye to Las Vegas. Hopefully I'll get more chances to go 'down under' again. We fly three times a week from HNL to SYD. Two of those have 48 hour layovers, and one has a 72 hour layover. Maybe next time I'll get the longer one! Thank you all of you who have waited patiently, and sent me e-mails asking me when the next trip report would be out. Hopefully it won't be another year before the next one arrives. Aloha!

HAL
One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
 
cxb744
Posts: 228
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 7:31 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 7:32 am

Great TR!!! Sydney is one of the prettiest cities.
What is it? It's A 747-400, but that's not important right now.
 
AFC_Ajax00
Posts: 739
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2000 5:33 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 7:34 am

A good read! I take it HAL's 767's don't a designated crew rest area, you grab a F/J seat right?
Once you have tasted flight, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward; for there you long to return
 
atrude777
Posts: 4348
Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2003 11:23 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 7:49 am

Absolutely wonderful report!

I would love to visit SYD myself and your report definetly made it more wanting to go.

Alex
Good things come to those who wait, better things come to those who go AFTER it!
 
jafa39
Posts: 4320
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 2:14 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 8:52 am

Nice one HAL, I'm going to SYD in April, any tips for eating out?
We, the undersigned, do hereby consent.....
 
Slovacek747
Posts: 634
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 7:10 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 9:01 am

Definitely write more trip reports. I'd like to read one about every one of your trips. Was in Sydney recently and yes it is an amazing city. Thanks for the awesome report.

Slovacek747
 
CastleIsland
Posts: 3212
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2006 1:40 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 9:11 am

Quoting Jafa39 (Reply 4):
I'm going to SYD in April, any tips for eating out?

I've always found that a nice trim beforehand makes all the difference. tongue 

Seriously HAL, that was one wonderful trip report. Thanks for sharing some scientific details of which I was not aware.
"People don't do what they believe in, they just do what's most convenient, then they repent." - Dylan
 
LH459
Posts: 793
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2005 2:41 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 10:54 am

Very nice report! I had forgotten how much I enjoy your reports. I hope it isn't a year before the next one!  Smile
"I object to violence because when it appears to do good, the good is temporary; the evil it does is permanent" - Ghandi
 
futuresdpdcop
Posts: 1252
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 10:26 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 11:16 am

Thanks for the TR. Great read. Can't wait for more. Don't wait to go back to SYD to do another one. I'm sure all of us would love to hear about a flight to the mainland as well.
 
vxg
Posts: 100
Joined: Sun May 02, 2004 12:31 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 11:49 am

Yes a HAL trip report!!!!!! I've been eagerly waiting for an HA one for some time now  Smile. How does it feel flying into PHX and LAS in a 767 now?
 
KL808
Posts: 1540
Joined: Thu May 20, 1999 3:49 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 11:50 am

Wow. Great trip report.

Hopefully in the future you can add some photos.

Drew
AMS-LAX-MNL
 
LAXspotter
Posts: 3227
Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 4:16 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 12:00 pm

Great Trip Report
Enjoyed the Specs. Was this the 767-300ER. Just out of curiosity at Maximum Takeoff Weight with the maximum fuel how long can the 767-300ER's mission be lets say at optimum cruise level of 350. I know that Aeroflot uses it for 14 hours on its Moscow-LAX sector.
"Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel" Samuel Johnson
 
midcon385
Posts: 467
Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2006 1:26 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 12:34 pm

HAL,

Outstanding to see another TR from you, and you've done another fantastic job. Since I've only joined the site recently, I never got to thank you for your previous TRs, which I also found fascinating. My best friend is one of your former colleagues, a dispatcher for ten years and counting at AWE, and has enjoyed your TRs as well. I'll have to let him know you have another one up.

Tim

[Edited 2007-02-08 04:34:55]
MidContinent Airlines: We Know How To Fly!
 
Lucky42
Posts: 297
Joined: Thu Jun 15, 2006 5:20 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 12:51 pm

You need to write more often...Glad to see you made a decision that makes you happy....Nice trip report..
 
CO7e7
Posts: 2697
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2004 3:39 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 1:28 pm

Great Report HAL... thank you very much for posting it..
I love reading pilot reports!

Zaki
 
ryu2
Posts: 1555
Joined: Tue Aug 06, 2002 8:18 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 3:06 pm

Great report! So do you guys use the CPDLC at all for oceanic reports? Or do you do all comms by voice over HF?
 
MattCan
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 1:04 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 3:50 pm

Outstanding. You really evoked clear images of life ina long haul cokpit. Beautifully written.
 
S12PPL
Posts: 3603
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2004 5:26 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 4:02 pm

Great report! Very cool to hear about an international run. I hope you are able to do more in the future! Thanks for sharing!
Next Flights: 12/31 AS804 PDX-MCO 2/3 AS19 MCO-SEA QX2545 SEA-PDX
 
safs
Posts: 193
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2005 7:35 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 4:43 pm

Gee who said you must have photos to accompany a trip report?? Thanks, HAL, that was very enjoyable. I flew HA three times last month (inter-island) and enjoyed every flight. The professionalism of the crew was exemplary and made my time in Hawaii that even better!

Keep writing trip reports as it's great to hear different perspectives.

Safs
 
tbear815
Posts: 689
Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2003 12:14 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 5:26 pm

Ernest K. Gann, author of "The High and the Mighty" was cockpit crew for Pan Am. Those A.netters who don't know of the book and the movie should check it out. John Wayne flying HNL/SFO with engine trouble.

HAL, I've added you to my respected list. If anyone questions why, then they're stupid. Your talent using words and descriptions is incredible. That's why I compare you to Ernie Gann. I don't mean to sound over-the-top, but your TR is incomparable. Having flown and sailed through the South Pacific from SFO/HNL/PPT/AKL/SYD, the ocean, clouds, and sky are all difficult to describe to those who haven't seen this region. I've crossed the South Pacific many times and always find it incredible.

Mahalo nui loa for a great read. I hope all goes well now that you're back with HA. Commuting from SEA to a base in HNL is time consuming, but keep writing! You've got a fantastic talent detailing what you love best.

All the best (and looking forward to future TR's)

Rod  Wink
 
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aloha73g
Posts: 1937
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 6:30 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Thu Feb 08, 2007 5:31 pm

Lucky you got to go to Sydney....I still haven't been yet!!

Great report....and I'm curious, which 60+ F/A was the super swimmer???  Wink

I need to keep my out out for you, but I probably won't see you because I seem to only go to SEA!!

-Aloha!
Aloha Airlines - The Spirit Moves Us. Gone but NEVER Forgotten. Aloha, A Hui Hou!
 
BWI757
Posts: 391
Joined: Sat Dec 18, 2004 3:58 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:41 am

Welcome back HAL! As always a great report, and it's interesting to compare your HP cross country red eyes with your current assignment.

BWI757
"Like stars across the sky, we were born to shine" - Andrea Bocelli
 
CX747
Posts: 6111
Joined: Tue May 18, 1999 2:54 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:47 am

Once again, an outstanding report from HAL. I have been one of those members patiently waiting and let me say, it was worth it. Thanks for taking the time to describe a life most of us dream of living.
"History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or timid." D. Eisenhower
 
kubus
Posts: 120
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2005 12:49 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 2:47 am

OMG it's HAL TR!!! You just made my day HAL!
 
jmy007
Posts: 540
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2004 2:18 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 3:07 am

Really enjoyed your report, thanks!

Quick question:

Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
. We only saw one other plane on our track, an unknown 747 going the opposite direction 1000 feet above us.

When you fly over long stretchs of ocean, do you not communicate with traffic in the area, since its so sparse?
Cookies are the Gateway pastry. They lead to Éclairs and Bear Claws.
 
jfk69
Posts: 1197
Joined: Sat Jul 01, 2006 3:04 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 4:28 am

Kudos for a great TR. I would take a SYD leg over any HP red-eye anyday.
 
LGA777
Posts: 954
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2003 12:46 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 5:24 am

Great report, you really should consider doing a book sometime in the future.

Cheers

LGA777
 
PanAmerican
Posts: 353
Joined: Thu Oct 09, 2003 8:32 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 9:01 am

Wow, what can I say!? Totally awesome report! Probably one of the best I've read on here... Thank you so much for taking the time to write it and share it here with us. You've earned my respect for that for sure...
I'd be interested to know how the loads on the HNL-SYD-HNL runs are and if they have a lot of connecting passengers from/to mainland US?


Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
We saw them, tiny uninhabited rocks in a vast ocean.

You probably haven't watched "Cast Away"... Tom Hanks is out there somewhere  Wink

All right, take care buddy. Hope to read more from you soon.

 Smile PA
Pan Am - The World's Most Experienced Airline.
 
Milesdependent
Posts: 620
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2001 5:27 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 10:30 am

Fantastic report Hal. Really enjoyed it. Glad you had a good time in Sydney. Hope the weather was good for you, as it has been a pretty cold and cloudy summer by our standards.
 
ONTFlyer
Posts: 312
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 2:49 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 11:07 am

HAL,

Thank you for another great TR. Glad that you made the best decision for you. Other TR's may have more glitz and glamour but pound-for-pound there is NO comparision to yours. You my friend, are without peer in this forum. The writing style is immaculate and classic. Please keep them coming!

ONT
Doin' just fine thanks...
 
NorthstarBoy
Posts: 1416
Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 12:53 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:30 pm

welcome back HAL, i've been wondering when we'd see your next TR. Great as usual, keep it up!
Yes, I'd like to see airbus go under so Boeing can have their customers!
 
ScarletHarlot
Posts: 4251
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 12:15 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:57 pm

David, good to see you back! Thanks for the great TR. I LOVED Sydney when we went there in 2005. We also went to Manly (but didn't swim in any races  Smile ) and walked around several of the areas you also walked. How cool that you got to fly between two wonderful places - Honolulu and Sydney!

Maybe on another SYD trip you can visit Airside Tarmac Tours - although perhaps you don't want to visit the office on your day off?  Smile We had a great time touring the airport. www.airsidetarmactours.com

Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
Now we were over the XXX sea

I suspect you had this as a placemarker, but I am sure that CastleIsland is dying to know where the Triple X-rated Sea is.  Wow!
But that was when I ruled the world
 
jafa39
Posts: 4320
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 2:14 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 2:02 pm

Quoting ScarletHarlot (Reply 31):
I am sure that CastleIsland is dying to know where the Triple X-rated Sea is.

Probably somewhere near the Baring Sea (sic)  Wink
We, the undersigned, do hereby consent.....
 
HAL
Topic Author
Posts: 1773
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2002 1:38 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 5:33 pm

Thank you everyone for your kind responses. If you don't watch out, I might start getting a big ego about this whole TR thing.  Smile

Quoting AFC_Ajax00 (Reply 2):
I take it HAL's 767's don't a designated crew rest area, you grab a F/J seat right?

The seats are reserved for us ahead of time as part of our contract (and FAA rules). It's usually a First Class seat somewhere in the last row of the FC cabin.

Quoting Jafa39 (Reply 4):
I'm going to SYD in April, any tips for eating out?

After just one trip there, I don't have much to offer in restaurant tips. For now try a guidebook, and maybe in a few months (if I can get more SYD trips) I should know more.

Quoting Vxg (Reply 9):
How does it feel flying into PHX and LAS in a 767 now?

It actually felt a little strange the first time back in both cities - kind of like going back to your old hometown or elementary school a few years after leaving. It was almost as if I was still missing something - I was there but not part of the 'big action' of being part of the hub there. However I've flown into both PHX and LAS many times now since being back at HA, and I've gotten used to the feeling.

Quoting LAXspotter (Reply 11):
Was this the 767-300ER. Just out of curiosity at Maximum Takeoff Weight with the maximum fuel how long can the 767-300ER's mission be lets say at optimum cruise level of 350. I know that Aeroflot uses it for 14 hours on its Moscow-LAX sector.

Yes, it was a -300ER. All our planes are -300 models, and all except the newest four we acquired from Delta (594HA, 596HA, 597HA, and 598HA) are ER models. I really don't know how far we could go with the planes - that depends a lot on how much payload (passengers and cargo) we carry. We could fill the tanks on an empty airplane and probably go more than 14 hours, but the payload pays the bill, and we're usually pretty full going to SYD. Those flights are blocked at about 10.5 hour down, and we were pretty close to max weight out of HNL. Our flight had room for more fuel, but not much more weight available to carry it with.

Quoting Ryu2 (Reply 15):
So do you guys use the CPDLC at all for oceanic reports? Or do you do all comms by voice over HF?

I'm not quite sure what the CPDLC is, but I'm assuming it is a data link of some sort. All our position report to ATC go by voice over HF, although we do link position reports directly over an HF datalink to our company's dispatch offices. ATC won't take them by HF, only Satcomm, and we don't have those in our planes yet.

Quoting Tbear815 (Reply 19):
That's why I compare you to Ernie Gann.

OK, now I'm getting embarassed. Thank you so much for the comparison, but I think I have a long way to go before I match Captain Gann. I've read most of his works, and it is something for me to aspire to, trying to equal his style.

Quoting Jmy007 (Reply 24):
When you fly over long stretchs of ocean, do you not communicate with traffic in the area, since its so sparse?

We really don't have any way of knowing where the other traffic is, other than seeing pass by. There is a common air-to-air frequency over the Pacific, and if we have something to report (weather, turbulence, etc) we do it there. Also, if we are bored and see someone passing by we may say hello, but often they either aren't listening, or are talking on the HF, or don't realize that we are talking to them. ATC knows where we all are, but until we get ATC readouts in the cockpit, we don't know where anyone else is.

Quoting PanAmerican (Reply 27):
I'd be interested to know how the loads on the HNL-SYD-HNL runs are and if they have a lot of connecting passengers from/to mainland US?

Actual load information is unfortunately proprietary info for the airlines, and I shouldn't (and won't) disclose it here, other than to say on both of my SYD legs we were very well loaded with passengers and cargo. I think most of the people we take to/from SYD aren't connecting to the mainland. The connections work well eastbound, but going westbound is difficult because the SYD flight departs before any of the inbound flights from the mainland arrive. It would be nice, but we ran into the problem of the SYD curfew several times with the short turnaround that schedule caused, and since the majority of the passengers were beginning/ending in Hawaii and Australia, changed the flight schedule to better accomodate the problem with the curfew. We just started the codeshare with Virgin Blue, and hopefully that will increase the loads even more, and maybe allow an increase in frequency.

Quoting ScarletHarlot (Reply 31):
Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
Now we were over the XXX sea

I suspect you had this as a placemarker, but I am sure that CastleIsland is dying to know where the Triple X-rated Sea is.

Ahhh, the joys of MSWord. Yes, I had put it in as a place marker because although I was 90% sure that part of the ocean was called the Coral Sea, I wanted to make sure before I submitted the TR. However my markings that ID'd the unfinished part of the report for me somehow got mysteriously erased, and when I looked it over I missed that one. Yes, I was trying to be accurate, and no CastleIsland, it's not a new 'vacation' spot!

Thanks again everyone. You make it most worthwhile to write these reports. Yes, there will be more to come later, when I can fit it into my increasingly busy writing time. Blue skies all.

HAL
One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
 
pelican
Posts: 2431
Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2004 9:51 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 09, 2007 8:44 pm

The long waiting had an end! Finally another great trip report from you!
 bigthumbsup 

pelican
 
pilotdude09
Posts: 1335
Joined: Mon May 02, 2005 12:35 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sat Feb 10, 2007 12:06 am

HAL,

Thanks for writing this report. Hawaii is an awesome place and would be cool working for HA. Your trip report is really motivation and inspiring and makes me want to be a pilot for an airline like HA more.

Once again thanks, and hopefully you'll come downunder more often  Smile
Qantas, Still calling Australia Home.........
 
Cactus739
Posts: 2256
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2004 6:41 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sat Feb 10, 2007 7:17 am

Great report!

Good to hear from you again HAL!
You can't fix stupid.... - Ron White
 
jetstar
Posts: 1414
Joined: Mon May 19, 2003 2:16 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sat Feb 10, 2007 7:38 am

Great Trip Report HAL, great to see you back at HA and best of luck in the future. Just added you to my respected list
 
HALFA
Posts: 1068
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2004 8:24 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sun Feb 11, 2007 5:29 am

Hey HAL, Great report! I enjoyed reading it. I've taken a little break from SYD flights but I'll start doing them regularly later this month. Maybe our paths will cross!

Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
White linen tablecloths, china plates, and real silverware (except the knives of course) were set on my tray table.

Actually, we use real knives now, so I was surprised to read you had the plastic ones served to you.

Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
Our aircraft -- N583HA -- had arrived on time an hour earlier.

Please tell me that this was a typo, and that you really did NOT have an ex-LTU on your SYD flight? I've been working these flights regularly since we inaugurated service in 2004 and I have yet to see the dreaded ex-LTU planes on this flight.

Quoting Aloha73G (Reply 20):
Great report....and I'm curious, which 60+ F/A was the super swimmer???

My guess was that it was Betty Ann. She's been a competitive swimmer since her days at Punahou School and often wins her competitions. She's a great swimmer!

Aloha,
HALFA
Hawaiian Airlines Since 1929...........
 
ca2ohHP
Posts: 657
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:14 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sun Feb 11, 2007 6:35 am

Wow....first TR i didn't lose interest in because of no pictures. I always loved reading your reports, and it's good to see you back posting and with Hawaiian.
 
HAL
Topic Author
Posts: 1773
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2002 1:38 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sun Feb 11, 2007 8:51 am

Quoting HALFA (Reply 38):
Actually, we use real knives now, so I was surprised to read you had the plastic ones served to you.

I was surprised too - I've had real knives the last few times I've been able to commute in FC.

Quoting HALFA (Reply 38):
Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
Our aircraft -- N583HA -- had arrived on time an hour earlier.

Please tell me that this was a typo, and that you really did NOT have an ex-LTU on your SYD flight?

Nope - no typo. I was surprised too, but seeing as it was my first SYD trip, I didn't know how unusual it was.

Quoting HALFA (Reply 38):
My guess was that it was Betty Ann.

Good guess! She was really excited to do it, and did a great job.

HAL
One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
 
WN230
Posts: 314
Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 2:41 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sun Feb 11, 2007 3:31 pm

Very good tr with lots of detail throughout.

WN230
Judas Priest North American tour in '08 . . . cannot wait!!!
 
IAHFLYR
Posts: 4104
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 12:56 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:56 am

HAL what a fabulous TR! I've missed your writing, a true gem you and your words are the photos! Thank you sir.
Any views shared are strictly my own and do not a represent those of any former employer.
 
DFW13L
Posts: 809
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 3:22 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Mon Feb 12, 2007 7:56 am

I really enjoyed this as well. We don't get bored, keep writing these! I particularly enjoyed reading about the details involved with the long-haul flight.

By the way, I was on vacation in Maui that week, and my brother, nephew, and I, (all airplane spotters) flew Island Air from JHM to HNL just for some plane spotting for a couple hours, and we got to HNL on the day you went to SYD. We arrived at 2pm, shortly after you were gone. Kind of an odd coincidence. It was my first time ever landing to the west at HNL. That was Thursday the 2nd, and I think that was the day you did your SYD.

Anyway, I digress. Great report! Congrats on getting your place back on a HA 763! There were millions of HA 763s at HNL. I was very impressed.
See, I knew American Eagle was first class all along!
 
N593HA
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2004 10:45 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 16, 2007 10:12 am

Excellent trip report It was fun and interesting to read. It must be really enjoying to work for HA.
By the way the more trip reports I read, the more I get the feeling that it's time to write my first trip-report! Hopefully I will find time for that in the near future.
In December I had an excellent, though bumpy flight on HA from PHX to HNL and return. So may be my first trip report will be about this flight.
Also I most likely will have the pleasure to fly HA again on the same route at the end of march and I will pick the chance to do the outbound flight right on my birthday. So far think that I only flew once right on my birthday.

Just as a side question, in your trip report you mention that you did the return-flight from SYD to HNL on board of N583HA. Do you know if this particular aircraft is an ex-LTU one?
I know that N585HA and N586HA are ex-LTU ones, but I'm not sure about N583HA.

Well, again an excellent trip-report and thank you for sharing it with us.

Take care + Aloha
N593HA
Next trip: KL+NW to HNL
 
HAL
Topic Author
Posts: 1773
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2002 1:38 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Fri Feb 16, 2007 2:13 pm

Quoting N593HA (Reply 44):
Just as a side question, in your trip report you mention that you did the return-flight from SYD to HNL on board of N583HA. Do you know if this particular aircraft is an ex-LTU one?
I know that N585HA and N586HA are ex-LTU ones, but I'm not sure about N583HA.

Yes, 583 is an ex-LTU aircraft, formerly registered as D-AMUP. We have four former LTU planes, 583, 84, 85, and 86. They were (in order), D-AMUP, AMUS, AMUR, and AMUN with the German carrier.

HAL
One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
 
HnlBoi
Posts: 128
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2006 12:37 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sat Feb 17, 2007 9:48 am

Does the 3 man cockpit apply for HA flights that are operated as turns such as the LAX, ANC, PPT, PPG? I understand the flight attendants work bot segments does that apply for the pilots as well?
 
User avatar
jetmech
Posts: 2356
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 2:14 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sat Feb 17, 2007 11:18 am

G'day HAL  Smile,

Nice trip report! It is always fascinating to get the pilots perspective on flight operations. I'm glad you liked Sydney! That walk along the coast from Bondi to Bronte is very nice. I often see the Hawaiian B763 parked on bay 53 at SYD/YSSY, as this bay is right outside our office. That's a long trip to be cooped up inside a relatively small 767!

Regards, JetMech
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
MCOflyer
Posts: 7086
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 5:51 am

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sat Feb 17, 2007 12:46 pm

Great TR. Please do more TR's for us. Btw, Are you on reserve or regular status?

MCOflyer
Never be afraid to stand up for who you are.
 
User avatar
aloha73g
Posts: 1937
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 6:30 pm

RE: Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report

Sat Feb 17, 2007 3:46 pm

Quoting HnlBoi (Reply 46):
Does the 3 man cockpit apply for HA flights that are operated as turns such as the LAX, ANC, PPT, PPG? I understand the flight attendants work bot segments does that apply for the pilots as well?

On our ANC, PPT, & PPG turns (no LAX turns at the moment) there is a 3 man cockpit.

-Aloha!
Aloha Airlines - The Spirit Moves Us. Gone but NEVER Forgotten. Aloha, A Hui Hou!

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