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1337Delta764
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Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:35 pm

I would like to know, does anyone know examples of clothing brands that are mistaken for store private labels? This usually arises from longtime relationships with retailers or exclusivity arrangements.

I know Arrow among the modern crowd was often mistaken for a Sears private label even though the brand is actually owned by PVH and is one of the oldest clothing brands in America. The Arrow brand was sold at Sears for many years, and it was only this year that PVH decided to pull the brand from Sears and to expand the brand at Kohl's and on Amazon.

Anyone know of other examples of clothing brands that are mistaken for store private labels? Another one might possibly be Daniel Cremieux, which I think has an exclusive relationship with Dillard's in the United States.
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stl07
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:09 am

The best example I can think of is Champion. They are all over Walmart and I thought they were a store brand until I saw their own store
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seb146
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:25 am

Adidas shoes have three stripes, K-Swiss have five but isn't there a discount brand with four? I thought I remember like K-Mart having that. I remember there was a knock-off of Lacoste. Not an alligator but some other like lizard or green lion or something.
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1337Delta764
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Sun Oct 13, 2019 8:52 pm

stl07 wrote:
The best example I can think of is Champion. They are all over Walmart and I thought they were a store brand until I saw their own store


I've seen Champion at several department stores, so I don't think many mistake them for a private label. They are not a high-end label though (I would consider them medium-low, above economy brands like Hanes, Gildan, and Fruit of the Loom, but below the mid-range segment). I think the reason why Arrow was often mistaken for a Sears brand among the modern crowd was due to their longtime relationship and much greater store presence; the Kohl's and Amazon relationships are much more recent. With PVH pulling the brand from Sears they are now expanding the brand's presence in Kohl's and Amazon.

Another way how labels can be mistaken for store private labels is if they sign exclusive agreements with a specific retailer. Daniel Cremieux seems to be an example; the brand is still owned by the Cremieux family in France, but in the United States they appear to have an exclusive agreement with Dillard's to sell their products.
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KFLLCFII
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:35 pm

1337Delta764 wrote:
I would like to know, does anyone know examples of clothing brands that are mistaken for store private labels? This usually arises from longtime relationships with retailers or exclusivity arrangements.

I know Arrow among the modern crowd was often mistaken for a Sears private label even though the brand is actually owned by PVH and is one of the oldest clothing brands in America. The Arrow brand was sold at Sears for many years, and it was only this year that PVH decided to pull the brand from Sears and to expand the brand at Kohl's and on Amazon.

Anyone know of other examples of clothing brands that are mistaken for store private labels? Another one might possibly be Daniel Cremieux, which I think has an exclusive relationship with Dillard's in the United States.


I didn't realize that store private labels in clothing were a thing...You mean there's like a "Kenmore dishwasher" of polo shirts out there? :laughing:

I always buy, using this order of priorities, whatever according to consumer reviews is 1) wrinkle resistant, and then 2) costs the least...That usually involves shirts and pants which will be used for both work and personal attire. The wrinkle-resistant quality usually also means durability for longevity. If it holds up through at least about 3 years, I'll buy the same thing again if it's still available...Unfortunately, that's usually not the case because brands have to "keep their product fresh", or something.

I already keep around a requisite 3-piece suit for any funerals that may occasionally come up, and I don't do weddings anymore (I file those under "L" for "Live Funeral") except for the small anticipated chance that one of my closest specific family members decides to tie the knot, if ever.

Other than sleep shirts, socks, and underwear, that's my wardrobe.
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washingtonflyer
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:26 pm

I see Kirkland in two places. Costco and the thrift store.
 
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1337Delta764
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:41 pm

KFLLCFII wrote:
1337Delta764 wrote:
I would like to know, does anyone know examples of clothing brands that are mistaken for store private labels? This usually arises from longtime relationships with retailers or exclusivity arrangements.

I know Arrow among the modern crowd was often mistaken for a Sears private label even though the brand is actually owned by PVH and is one of the oldest clothing brands in America. The Arrow brand was sold at Sears for many years, and it was only this year that PVH decided to pull the brand from Sears and to expand the brand at Kohl's and on Amazon.

Anyone know of other examples of clothing brands that are mistaken for store private labels? Another one might possibly be Daniel Cremieux, which I think has an exclusive relationship with Dillard's in the United States.


I didn't realize that store private labels in clothing were a thing...You mean there's like a "Kenmore dishwasher" of polo shirts out there? :laughing:

I always buy, using this order of priorities, whatever according to consumer reviews is 1) wrinkle resistant, and then 2) costs the least...That usually involves shirts and pants which will be used for both work and personal attire. The wrinkle-resistant quality usually also means durability for longevity. If it holds up through at least about 3 years, I'll buy the same thing again if it's still available...Unfortunately, that's usually not the case because brands have to "keep their product fresh", or something.

I already keep around a requisite 3-piece suit for any funerals that may occasionally come up, and I don't do weddings anymore (I file those under "L" for "Live Funeral") except for the small anticipated chance that one of my closest specific family members decides to tie the knot, if ever.

Other than sleep shirts, socks, and underwear, that's my wardrobe.


Yes, and some are actually old brands that are now owned by department stores. Kohl's has Croft & Barrow, Sonoma, and Apt. 9. JCPenney has Arizona, St. John's Bay, and (Liz) Claiborne (among others). Amazon owns several private labels of clothing as well.
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falstaff
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Mon Oct 14, 2019 7:07 pm

I could see Lands End being confused for Sears Private label at one time. Other than the catalog you couldn't get Lands End at other stores.
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1337Delta764
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Mon Oct 14, 2019 7:22 pm

falstaff wrote:
I could see Lands End being confused for Sears Private label at one time. Other than the catalog you couldn't get Lands End at other stores.


Well, they were at one point actually owned by Sears.
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Dieuwer
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Tue Oct 15, 2019 11:40 pm

I think the opposite happens more often: A store brand mistaken for a private label brand.
 
Ken777
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Wed Oct 16, 2019 1:15 am

I can remember when we moved to Perth and I started working in a local menswear retail chain (Walsh's) that had ben successful with private labels. Harbour Master pants were very popular and I know that customers would go to competitors asking for that brand - a real pain in the a$$ for the competition. Private labels allows retailers a bit of room for enhanced profits, especially when there was local production.

On the flip side - these days quality wool is less expensive because we are in a casual world and suits are not needed. This allows some retailers to deliver men's wear that has an average cut. make & trim but a high quality fabric. I have a blazer from Jos A Banks that fit that approach, and I love it. It is about half the price it would have been in the traditional market from the 80's
 
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1337Delta764
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Wed Oct 16, 2019 7:13 pm

Dieuwer wrote:
I think the opposite happens more often: A store brand mistaken for a private label brand.

Um, store brands and private labels are the same thing. I am talking about global or national brands owned by major fashion companies being mistaken for store private labels.
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Dieuwer
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Re: Clothing brands mistaken for store private labels

Wed Oct 16, 2019 7:17 pm

1337Delta764 wrote:
Dieuwer wrote:
I think the opposite happens more often: A store brand mistaken for a private label brand.

Um, store brands and private labels are the same thing. I am talking about global or national brands owned by major fashion companies being mistaken for store private labels.


Whoops. OK, so I mean the opposite what you suggest.

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