myk
Topic Author
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Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Fri Oct 05, 2007 9:28 pm

Dear frinds,

just wanted to know why OK stands for czech registered aircrafts ?

thanks for an answer
 
JoKeR
Posts: 1851
Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2004 12:34 pm

RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Fri Oct 05, 2007 9:40 pm

This was the code awarded to them by ICAO and IATA...
 
RIXrat
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RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Fri Oct 05, 2007 10:07 pm

Urban legend says that when airline names were awarded -- I believe in 1946/46 -- the Czechoslovak delegation, not versed too much in English, just said OK to the questions asked. So the name stuck.
 
PanAm747
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RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Fri Oct 05, 2007 10:08 pm

When the country was "Czechoslovakia", the registration code for the country was "OK":


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CSA, as the airline was known as, made the most of the term "OK" as it has become fairly universal - some of their jet-powered aircraft were known as "OKJets".

The "Velvet Divorce" that separated the country into the Czech Republic and Slovakia gave the Czech Republic the code OK for its planes:


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Slovakia was given the code "OM":


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Viscount724
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RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Fri Oct 05, 2007 10:18 pm

Quoting JoKeR (Reply 1):
This was the code awarded to them by ICAO and IATA...

Don't think OK stands for anything. It's one of the fairly rare cases where the aircraft registration prefix assigned by ICAO (a UN agency) for the country is the same as the airline's 2-letter code assigned by IATA. In many if not most cases, the registration prefix (and often the airline code) are meaningless. For example, the registration prefix for Finland is OH and Finnair's IATA code is AY. Airlines will often request an IATA code that has some relationship to the airline's name (e.g. the first 2 letters etc.) but if the preferred code is already assigned they have to take what's available, which today often means an alpha-numeric code because they have starting running out of 2-letter codes. e.g. JetBlue = B6.

I am guessing that when the airline 2-letter codes were assigned many years ago they may simply requested the same code as the aircraft registration prefix. And "OK" is a widely-understood term in its non-airline context, even in languages other than English.
 
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OzarkD9S
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RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Sat Oct 06, 2007 12:00 am

I would be more interested in knowing why they keep the "S" in CSA....marketing reasons I suppose, but with Slovakia being a separate country, it seems a bit odd.
"True, I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain." -Mercutio
 
Rivet42
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RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Sat Oct 06, 2007 2:18 am

Quoting OzarkD9S (Reply 5):
I would be more interested in knowing why they keep the "S" in CSA....marketing reasons I suppose, but with Slovakia being a separate country, it seems a bit odd.

...if you look at their website, you'll see that CSA originally stood for Czechoslovak State Airlines. Thus CSA is still 'valid', if taken to mean, nominally at least, Czech State Airlines.

Riv'
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WildcatYXU
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RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Sat Oct 06, 2007 3:26 am

Quoting Rivet42 (Reply 6):
..if you look at their website, you'll see that CSA originally stood for Czechoslovak State Airlines. Thus CSA is still 'valid', if taken to mean, nominally at least, Czech State Airlines.

Riv'

I wasn't the case in time of separation. The business name was Ceskoslovenske Aerolinie without the state in name.

Quoting OzarkD9S (Reply 5):
I would be more interested in knowing why they keep the "S" in CSA....marketing reasons I suppose, but with Slovakia being a separate country, it seems a bit odd.

I agree, (our friend Turbolet would not). However, It's the same company, so they kept it. BTW, CSA is still serving Slovakia (and is having flights to quite weird locations), so why not? Many people in Slovakia still consider CSA "our airline", same as Skoda is still "our car".
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JoKeR
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RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Sat Oct 06, 2007 8:39 am

Quoting OzarkD9S (Reply 5):
I would be more interested in knowing why they keep the "S" in CSA....marketing reasons I suppose, but with Slovakia being a separate country, it seems a bit odd.

Same question posed frequently in Serbia over JAT which is an abbreviation of Jugoslovesnki Aerotransport or Yugoslav Airlines
 
FlySSC
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RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Sat Oct 06, 2007 8:29 pm

As mentionned, OK is the IATA code for CSA and the registration code for aircraft of the Czech RepubliC.

I think CSA was also the only airline in the world to display its IATA code as a livery in its old colorscheme :


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Jano
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RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Sat Oct 06, 2007 9:24 pm

Quoting RIXrat (Reply 2):
Urban legend says that when airline names were awarded -- I believe in 1946/46 -- the Czechoslovak delegation, not versed too much in English, just said OK to the questions asked. So the name stuck.

The rumor has it that the CSA's delegation was lead by a guy called Ondrej Koren. And when asked what registration the delegation wanted for CSA he could not think of anything else but OK  Wink
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Viscount724
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RE: Why "ok" In CSA Czech Airlines

Sat Oct 06, 2007 9:54 pm

Quoting FlySSC (Reply 9):
I think CSA was also the only airline in the world to display its IATA code as a livery in its old colorscheme

There's at least one more. Siberia Airlines even changed their marketing name to S7 Airlines, based on their IATA code, although their legal name remains Siberia Airlines (or it's Russian equivalent).


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